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What is the best/worst job hunting advice you've received?

  1. somelikeitscott profile image56
    somelikeitscottposted 5 years ago

    I am currently unemployed and it's making me crazy. Making me crazier still is all the good/bad advice I get from EVERYONE (even when it is unsolicited).

    So what's the best/worst job hunting advice you've ever received?

    To read my mother's hilarious advice to me on a recent phone call, click here
    <link snipped>

    1. Hollie Thomas profile image60
      Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      When I first left school and had my very first interview, I was understandably nervous. My mum said "Look, don't worry, they're human just like you. In fact, if you feel really nervous during the interview, imagine them in a nappy, because they've definitely worn one."

      Unfortunately, during the interview I could not get the image out of my mind of an overweight 50 something male in a giant nappy. Consequently, I suffered uncontrollable fits of hysteria throughout the interview............No, I didn't get the job!

      1. Hollie Thomas profile image60
        Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Sorry, not hysteria but laughter. Brain not fully engaged:)

        1. somelikeitscott profile image56
          somelikeitscottposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Hollie Thomas,
          Ha! That's a good one!!

  2. Hollie Thomas profile image60
    Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago

    It didn't seem that good when I had my very first rejection=) Nowadays, when in such situations, I have to erase all thoughts of nappies from my mind:)

  3. profile image0
    Home Girlposted 5 years ago

    http://s2.hubimg.com/u/5542941_f248.jpg

    1. somelikeitscott profile image56
      somelikeitscottposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Hilarious! And I love IKEA!

  4. JLBender profile image81
    JLBenderposted 5 years ago

    I think there is a ton of information on the web for specific interview and resume tips. You can check out my profile for some (more to come soon). I believe the best advice when you are unemployed is to never give up. The search can get frustrating, but it is a numbers game. Something eventually will come up.

    Another piece of advice is to take some time off of job hunting every week. The process can be frustrating, but you need stay mentally sharp when you do get called in for an interview. Don't think about jobs on the weekends and even take Wednesday off as well.

    1. somelikeitscott profile image56
      somelikeitscottposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks JLBender, I'll check out your writings on the matter and I agree, although it's hard, taking a break is much needed and makes a big difference.

  5. jcmayer777 profile image80
    jcmayer777posted 5 years ago

    I'm not the best to give out advice on job hunting, but I've conducted thousands of interviews over the years. 

    The easiest advice I can give is to not to tell the interviewer you're a perfectionist when they ask what your weaknesses are. It's been over-used for 10 years to the point where a person that's actually honest about it stands out from the crowd in a good way.

  6. Jerbob1 profile image61
    Jerbob1posted 5 years ago

    The best job search advice I ever got was from Richard Nelson Bolles in his first edition of What Color Is Your Parachute.  It was to never let a resume come between you and an employer.

    The worst advice I ever got was from two state employment agencies that recommended that the unemployed keep sending out more and more resumes and cover letters.

    Today, in Silicon Valley one job posting can produce over 700 resume submissions.  Considering that over 90 percent will be trash-canned, those are lousy odds.  "Never let a resume come between you and an employer?"  Try this approach... of course the trick is to find alternatives to this ineffective and inefficient process.

    One more: Pretend you're a number-one salesperson.  If you do, you'll spend hours researching the company and the hiring manager and then set up a fact-finding interview before you even mention that you're looking for a job.  Asking smart, in-depth questions about what the employer needs will make you stand out...before an actual job interview. 

    And another: Too many job seekers forget to find out the answer to this simple question: What is the problem that hiring me (instead of the other applicants) would solve for the employer?

 
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