Mining AOL Gold: Keywords That Increase AdClicks 210% & CPMs 312% - Part I

In Paul Edmondson's recent How to Make Money with Google AdSense Hub, he stated HubPages' research discovered that:

People that begin their search on AOL (and ASK) are among the most likely to click on ads and on HubPages, they generate some of the highest CPMs. They are 210% more likely to click on ads than the average visitor to the site and generate CPMs 312% more than the average source of traffic.

That information absolutely floored me as it seemed that there was a very interesting correlation between the "point of origin" of a Hub reader and the times that they click on the ads found on the page, as well as the CPM (revenue divided by impressions times 1000). Since many Hubbers are extremely interested in increasing their AdSense earnings, (although I take a slightly different tack, as I've explained in my Hal's Not So Secret Hub) this seemed like a truly golden nugget of information which was too good to ignore.

I'm aware that not all my readers may be completely up to speed as to the arcana that is AdSense, so let's summarize it in a simple, basic manner. The more people click on your ads, and the more those ads are worth, the more money you make. Therefore, any Hubber interested in increasing their monthly AdSense check should consider utilizing keywords that attract the type of traffic that has a greater tendency to click on the ads on the Hub page. That equals more money for you.

With Paul Edmondson's revelation that AOL users click on over twice the ads as the average HubPage visitor and that generates over three times the income, it is obvious that these AOLers should become a prime target for the income-minded Hubber.

So how does a Hubber go about attracting AOL traffic? Before we get to those hundreds of absolutely solid gold keywords gleaned from over 650,000 actual AOL users, we first have to understand who the AOLer is: Thus this comparison of the demographics of HubPages readers and AOLers.

Age

  • Age 3-11: Hub has 4 %, AOL has 2 %.
  • Age 12-17: Hub has 14 %, AOL has 18 %.
  • Age 18-34: Hub has 34 %, AOL has 35 %.
  • Age 35-49: Hub has 30 %, AOL has 25 %.
  • Age 50+: Hub has 18 %, AOL has 20 %.

This is very interesting as it seems that AOL has a significantly larger 12-17 year old base, a smaller 35-49 year old one, and a larger 50+ component. Therefore, it can readily be stated that AOL skews young and old, while being relatively weak in the middle. What this translates out to for the Hubber is that the topics that are going to attract AOLers are the ones that have relevance to the 12-17 and the 50+ market.

Gender

  • Male Readers: Hub has 45 %, AOL has 45 %.
  • Female Readers: Hub has 55 %, AOL has 55 %.

 There is no difference in gender, so there need be no reason in skewing readership demographics between AOL and HubPages.

Ethnicity

  • Caucasian: Hub has 77 %, AOL has 77 %.
  • African: Hub has 9 %, AOL has 10 %.
  • Asian: Hub has 4 %, AOL has 4 %.
  • Hispanic: Hub has 8 %, AOL has 7 %.
  • Other: Hub has 2 %, AOL has 1 %.

This is an interesting statistic, but I'm not 100% sure that it's fully accurate. There seems to be no real difference in ethnicities between the two sites, but that does not make sense when we consider that a far greater percentage of HubPage readers come from India! 22.7% of all HubPages readers are from India, according to Alexa, and Quantcast states that more people read HubPages in Madras than in Los Angeles! Therefore, I wouldn't take this particular piece of data as gospel as it seems the ethnicity breakdown figures are flawed.

Have Children

  • No Kids: Hub has 59 %, AOL has 64 %.
  • Has Kids: Hub has 41 %, AOL has 36 %.

In reviewing this data, it's clear that AOLers are less likely to be parents than HubPage readers. Therefore, AOLers are less likely to be attracted by, say, a Hub on infant feeding issues, than the average HubPage visitor.

Income

  • $0-30K: Hub has 23 %, AOL has 18 %.
  • $30K-60K: Hub has 30 %, AOL has 25 %.
  • $60K-100K: Hub has 25 %, AOL has 28 %.
  • $100K+: Hub has 22 %, AOL has 29 %.

 The determination that can be made from this data is that the AOLer is significantly wealthier than their HubPages counterpart.

Education Level

  • No College: Hub has 45 %, AOL has 46 %.
  • College: Hub has 42 %, AOL has 40 %.
  • Graduate: Hub has 13 %, AOL has 14 %.

Surprisingly, there isn't a huge difference in educational background between the two sites, making the extra income of the AOLers even more interesting.

I know, I know... you didn't start reading this series of Hubs to see fancy charts. You want the list of golden keywords gleaned from the actual searches conducted by AOLers. OK... here we go!

Mining AOL Gold: Keywords That Increase AdClicks 210% & CPMs 312% - Part II

And if you want to jump directly to the specific keyword category pages, you can click on these links:

Top 500 Keywords

Arts & Crafts

Automotive

Books & Writing

Business & Jobs

Computers

Entertainment

Fashion & Beauty

Food

Games, Toys & Hobbies

Health & Science

Holidays & Special Occasions

Home & Family

Knowledge & Education

Lottery & Gambling

Music & Lyrics

Personal Finance

Pets & Animals

Politics & Social Issues

Religion & Beliefs

Shopping

Sports & Recreation

Technology (Non-Computer)

Travel & Places

... and yes, of course, the most popular category on the internet is pornography, but since it is rightfully outlawed on HubPages, I am not able to list the keywords and links on a page on this site. What I have done is to include all of that information in a text file which can be downloaded by clicking on this link:

XXX-Rated

This file is hosted on a free file site which is outside of HubPages. I warn you that this file is intended for adult downloading only as it includes links to extremely pornographic material that I am not responsible or liable for, and am not connected with in any way. All of this data is derived from the massive AOL database.

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Comments 7 comments

Netters profile image

Netters 7 years ago from Land of Enchantment - NM

That's very interesting. Can't wait to read more.


Christa Dovel profile image

Christa Dovel 7 years ago from The Rocky Mountains, North America

Thank you for putting together this information. I bookmarked it, and will be referring to it in the future... tho I doubt it will affect what I write about! It is still very interesting.


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Netters: I hope you enjoy it!

Christa Dovel: Thanks! I've noted in various of my other Hubs that I do not write for the Adsense income, but there are many Hubbers who do, and the information gathered here could be of assistance.


Paul Edmondson profile image

Paul Edmondson 7 years ago from Burlingame, CA

Hal, great hub as usual. One thing that really jumped out at me from our data is the number of navigational type queries from AOL users. Seems like they type in the search bar the domain. By looking at your data, it looks like there are lots of domain type queries in there as well.


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Thanks Paul! That is another very valuable insight! I structured this series of Hubs largely around the most popular URLs visited by AOLers so that Hubbers could visit them and see for themselves the type of content which proves so attractive, so it's great to learn that nugget of information (even though it likely means Hubbers seeking AOL traffic need to work a little harder). I guess that it falls into the stereotypical view of AOLers as being unsophisticated web users: They'll see a URL on the side of their cereal boxes and type it into a search bar! :)


Will James profile image

Will James 7 years ago from New York, NY

Those stats are baloney. I eat them on my baloney sandwich for lunch.


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Oh, yes, Will James. You're right and the top, acknowledged, independent, and authoritative statistical sources for online traffic are wrong. Not MUCH deluded are you? :)

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