The Flute and the Flute-Player: Nellieanna Hay

The Western Concert Flute

© Alison Gericke
© Alison Gericke

Hub Index

1. The Flute;

2. The Flute-player;

3. Nellieanna Hay is a typical flute-player;

4. Nellieanna's favorite music for romantic love, sensual love, raw sadness, anger, nostalgia plus one specific memory.

Listen to the sound of a Western concert flute

The Western Concert Flute

Even though concert flutes are seldom made out of wood, but of brass, glass, silver, gold, platinum, carbon fiber, palladium and mostly of alloys containing significant amounts of copper or silver, it is considered to be a woodwind instrument because sound is produced when a stream of air is blown into the flute through the embouchure hole unto the sharp edge of the flute. Specific pitches are produced by opening and closing the 16 circular tone holes and by directing and intensifying the air stream.

Other names for the Western concert flute are ‘Transverse (side-blown) flute’, ‘Boehm flute’, or ‘C flute’.

The piccolo, alto-, soprano-, treble flute and various bass flutes are part of this specific flute family.

The flute is one of the oldest music instruments. However, the modern western concert flute and the rest of the family with its particular key system is the creation of the flutist, composer and silversmith, Theobald Boehm. He patented the system in 1847. One of his major innovations was the changing from wood to metal and the linking of the key system, which simplified fingering. Since 1947 only a few substantial changes have been made until 1980 when Johan Brögger finally modified the flute by fixing the two major problems – the maladjustument between certain keys and problems between the G key and the B♭ key.

Concert flutes have three parts - the headjoint, sealed by a cork, the body, and the foot joint. The head may look the less complicated, but it is the most difficult part to construct as the lip plate and tone hole have critical dimensions, angles and edges.

A symphonic wind orchestra (concert band) may have a large flute section playing the first and second parts composed for flutes. One or two accomplished flute players normally play the piccolo – a half-size flute producing sound an octave higher than written. Critics rarely complain that the flutes are too loud. To the contrary, an inadequate flute section could easily be browbeaten by the brass section.

Western concert flute

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_concert_flute
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_concert_flute

THE GOLDEN RULE WITH INSTRUMENTS:

The more complicated they are as machines, the easier they are to play. (A very simple instrument like the violin leaves all the work to the player.) ~ Atarah Ben-Tovim & Douglas Boyd

Music for the Western Concert Flute

http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/look_inside/19450212
http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/look_inside/19450212
© Alison Gericke
© Alison Gericke

The Flute-Player

A flute-player is called a ‘flutist’ or ‘flautist’. Less popular terms are fluteist’ and ‘flutomater’.

The English term ‘flutist’, recorded in the Oxford English Dictionary since 1603, was coined to ‘flautist’ in the eighteen century by the Italians and specifically by Nathaniel Hawthorne in ‘The Marble Faun’.

Aware of these highly controversial terms for flute-players I am quoting Alison Gericke, professional musician and music teacher.

My question: “What is the most popular word - flutist or flautist?”

Alison Gericke: “Flute-player. But between the above two terms: 'flautist', definitely. 'Flutist' has been around for longer, but 'flautist' is usually the one you hear being used. It just rolls of the tongue and has that sophisticated effect;). (Some flute-players dislike the word 'flautist' because it has some connection to 'flaunt' in origin - these things can get quite controversial.)

Thank you, Alison! ‘Flaut’ is indeed a Latin verb which means ‘to jeer’ or ‘to mock’. So it is quite understandable why dedicated flute-players prefer ‘flutist’ instead of ‘flautist’.

~

"I am a flute player not a flautist. I don't have a flaut and I've never flauted." ~ James Galway.

~

According to Atarah Ben-Tovim and Douglas Boyd, authors of “The Right Instrument For Your Child”, the flute is suitable for the social as well as the a-social person. But not for the more aggressive and dominant person who needs to expend more energy and produce more noise that the flute will allow.

Flute-players are romantic, sensitive, creative and able to improvise. Their ability to function in auto-pilot-mode while their thoughts are elsewhere deserves recognition. Even in precarious conditions or when browbeaten by dominant superiors and peers, they can escape into a fantasy world where all clouds have silver linings.


Meaningful quotes about the flute and flute-players


Meylan (in The Flute): “… the sound of the flute… seems to possess a magic power that emanates from its innermost being. It speaks, it moves, it entrances, almost as if it had been revealed to us on the glorious day of creation…… The flute calms the spirit and penetrates the ear with such sweet sound that it brings peace and an abeyance of motion unto the soul. And should some sorrow dwell in the mind, a care that wine cannot make us forget and banish, it lulls us to sleep and is balm on account of its sweet and gracious sound, provided that it adheres to modest music and does not excite and inflame the soul with too many notes and passages, which would weaken it and could easily come to grief on account of the wine."

Jean Craig (in The Woodwinds): "Of all the wind instruments, the flute can do the most things the most easily. A fine performer on a flute can dash up a scale and down again so quickly that our ears cannot separate the notes. A flutist can skip and jump from note to note so lightly that the music reminds us of the quickness of a rabbit or of a gazelle. He can swoop and turn and trill the notes until we think that we are hearing a bird. Musicians say that a flute can do anything!"

Eddie Cahill: "Playing a flute is like writing a book. You're telling what's in your heart...It's easier to play if it's right from your heart. You get the tone, and the fingers will follow."

Garrison Keillor (in The Young Lutheran's Guide to the Orchestra): "The flute is the show-off of the wind section, the big shot: Jean-Pierre Rampal, James Galway--both millionaires. (How many millionaire bassoonists can you name real fast?) Well, that's fine. Everybody knows it's the hardest, blowing across a tiny hole with your head tilted all your life: it's like soloing on a pop bottle. The problem with the flute is that it vibrates your brain, and you start wearing big white caftans and smocks and eat roots and berries. You become a pantheist and sit in meadows, and you believe that all is one and God is everything--God is a column of air vibrating--and you know that's not right." (Lol!)

According to mythology the goddess Athene invented the flute and then threw it away because it made her face ugly.

The Socrates of the Republic rejected the flute because it was too exciting and emotional.


Ben-Tovim and Boyd cover all matters regarding music tuition in their book: "The Right Instrument For Your Child."

© Nellieanna Hay
© Nellieanna Hay | Source

Nellieanna Hay

Looking for the musician in Nellieanna I can clearly see a flutist in her. Her poems in HubPages have a unique and ethereal quality, enthralling the reader right into a fantasy world where all question and answers are connected with strings of gold. They are delightful reads at the beginning and the end of a day and especially at the end to ponder and cherish until Sleep turns them into dreams.

As part of Nellieanna's audition for musicianship in Hubville Symphonic Wind Orchestra, I've asked her to submit a few songs that have the power to put her in a specific mood.

Nellieanna takes the floor:


ROMANTIC LOVE:

It's a sense of complete oneness with the beloved, being immersed in his very being and his in me, with abiding feelings deep as the ocean, and as constant, yet as alive and moving with all its new discoveries, surprises, delights, beauties and pleasures, - along with occasional real-life glitches to be resolved happily. It's the romantic feeling of our love at the very thought of him or mention of his name, along with caring so deeply, I'd do all I could if he needed me in illness or stress, just as fully as in health and joy. This song is one of many which remind me of that deep kind of love....

SENSUAL LOVE:

For me, it's the indescribable and specific, nearly irresistible pull toward a man's manliness, especially when he's someone I love, respect and for whom I care in all ways. The sensual aspect of love is unique in it, though! It makes me tingle, my breath shorten and become staccato as I become more acutely aware of my womanliness and desire, very specifically. This song embodies all of that to me as much as or more than any other...

RAW SADNESS:

It's something I've felt on more than one occasion in this lengthy life. I've lost most of my 'others' of my kin and closest spiritual kinship, either to death or tragic separation. The rawness doesn't disappear but it does subside a bit. The most specific, most recent experience of that kind of raw sadness was coupled with a kind of awareness that, even so, it was not 'the end' though it felt so final at the time. It was when, not too long after my beloved George died, Restland (where he's buried, as well as are several of my other folks) invited recently bereaved (and any other bereaved who wished to attend) to a special service honoring our lost loved one(s). It was beautifully touching, but the most beautiful intense moments were after the chapel service ended, when we were all asked to step outside onto the clearing there and to form a circle. First, an attendant opened a cage, took out a live white dove and carried it around the inside of the circle, allowing the children to pat the bird. It was easy to observe their delight. The dove was returned to the cage and this following song began being played while the attendant opened up the large cage and released a flock of white doves into the clear afternoon Autumn sky, so blue with tinges of approaching sunset pink on a few fluffy silvery clouds and the tops of trees with changing leaf colors. It was incredibly beautiful. The doves circled round and round several times, happily free to stretch their lovely wings before they flew off to their next assigned place, where, of course, they would be returned to their regular resting place within the Restland campus. I'd actually seen the doves inside the building when George Jr. and I were arranging for the funeral, but had no idea what their presence would mean! What it meant to me, as it turned out, was one of the most memorable, poignant and significant moments during my early grieving for my George. It was both raw and lifting. I was reminded that he'd flown too, away from his diminishing life and into whatever freedom awaited his precious spirit then. After that, I could speak to his pictures as I'd done and still do, with that much more special message.

ANGER:

I'm not given to explosive anger, but I'm very much in tune with ALL my feelings and value them. Early outbursts in my life left me with intense headaches and regrets, plus a dawning sense that I had other resources inside with which to learn to direct all that energy and passion into more constructive channels, without losing the power of possessing them and the lessons they teach. I believe that all emotions are valuable and to be, first of all - felt fully and then understood and put to best use possible. It's individual, but for me, lashing out at the first moment of anger has never been satisfactory for me or for others. There are few songs which capture exactly what this emotion is to me, to fully feel anger arise and to begin to look for sensible ways to think it through, redirect it, learn from it and spare so many damages to myself and others before it's destroyed and/or left memories that cannot be erased! There's a sort of sweet church song I used to hear, titled "Angry Words" - ' . . oh, let them never from my lips unbridled slip. . .' But I've always felt it's a bit too arbitrary and 'pat'. Anger doesn't just move aside so easily. I certainly don't want to stuff mine, but rather to understand it and put it to better use! So I thought of this song to express one way fury might be redirected at, and with the other person which is a tongue-in-cheek challenge coupled with humor, too. I figure I can always get mad later if all else fails! :-)

NOSTALGIA (LONGING):

It's such a special emotion and one with which I'm quite familiar. The division between happy, sad and longing emotions often does fade into one abiding emotion which is, accurately, NOSTALGIA.

BTW - at one time in my 1950 college years, I wore a haunting perfume called "Nostalgia" by Germaine Montiel. It became unavailable eventually, as so many of my preferred things do!

The song that first comes to mind when I think of this emotion, though, is "I'll Be Seeing You". Its lovely simple melody and poignant lyrics of the WWII years was written for those separated by the realities of war, when the person on each end of separation reminisced about the things they'd shared together which they so longed to share again when the war ended. I wasn't old enough to be in that position then, but my George was and he loved this song all his life. When my turn came to be separated from him by his death, I so often reminisce the things we did together. This is the song I used for the memorial webpage I made for him, which Restland also used to make a keepsake DVD of his life as I'd captured it on the webpage. The song always brings tears of missing, longing nostalgia to my eyes.

ONE SPECIFIC (touching) MEMORY:

"It's complicated", as they say! The song I include does bring back one specific touching memory, but it's part of a bigger, longer memory. It's about my 'first love', Kenneth, with whom I fell 'in love' - (unreciprocated) - at age 7,which lasted for me alone till in our teens, when his love caught up with me in it. He loved to strum his guitar and sing in his strong Texas accent, (which was a unique one and one thing I loved about him) with his baritone voice. Many years later after we'd broken up and our lives took different paths, he returned to mine when I was with George. They, fortunately, became friends, as did Kenneth and I, but without the romance. He taped several classic REAL 'cowboy' songs for us but he also taped this song just for me. It warmed my heart and let me know that we had a connection that was pretty much eternal, though it was never to be consummated in any other way. He died in 1984, not too long after he sent us the tapes.

This rendition is better musically than Kenneth's and it also includes some wonderful glimpses of the vast variety that is my beloved Texas in all its MANY moods and faces, many of which have been part of my first-hand memories, too. But it is the specific memory of hearing Kenneth's tape of this song dedicated to me to which I dedicate this rendition....

Thank you Nellieanna Hay

The fact that you can connect your emotions to a specific song is a quality in your favor and will certainly ensure your success as a musician in Hubville Symphonic Wind Orchestra. To make your audition for 1st Flute-player an unforgettable experience you may use as accompaniment the following video of the Royal Academy of Music....


A blurred photo of myself, studying the flute in 2002
A blurred photo of myself, studying the flute in 2002

Shared with public by 'Beautiful Nature And Amazing World'

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Comments 94 comments

billybuc profile image

billybuc 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

I would rate this a perfect hub my friend! You paid tribute to Nellie, you taught us about the flute, and you shared personal experiences. Yes, for sure, a perfect hub! Well done Martie!


mckbirdbks profile image

mckbirdbks 4 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

I want to buy out every seat to this concert with the orchestra that you are assembling. I’ll bask in the pure delight of the melody. Martie you missed your calling. New York Philharmonic Orchestra needs you. Once again you have exceeded the upper limits of what a Hub should be.


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 4 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

ONCE, TWICE, THREE TIMES A LADY...

Sista, You have selected a most lovely lady to showcase in our orchestra and the flute is an exquisite selection. Your attention to content and detail is admirable and educational.

Nellieanna, You share so beautifully and I love each of your song selections...I will enjoy coming back to listen often

Voted UP and UABI...keep em coming, Martie! Hugs, Maria


Mhatter99 profile image

Mhatter99 4 years ago from San Francisco

If there is something left out of this impressive tribute I couldn't see it. You did a marvelous job. Thank you.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Before I begin to respond to any other lovely comments, - Martie, how honored I am to be chosen as the flutist in your magnificent growing orchestra! I'd secretly hoped to be! On my Yamaha Grand Piano keyboard, I almost never play in any instrument's voice except piano -- and occasionally the flute voice. I adore its sound and mood. I might have liked to play the harp, as Mother had wished would be within opportunity, but wasn't in Del Rio. But more, I'd liked to have learned the flute. But my bucket list would become a barrel list or bigger if I included all the things I'd like to do before I kick it! :-)

I've truly enjoyed reading your informative essay on the flute, too. You're such a knowledgeable musician! It's like going to a class one would never, ever want to 'cut' or miss a moment of it. You make it all come alive visually as well as audibly! You make my selections and comments about them look better than they are! Thank you for a lovely place in your extraordinary cyber orchestra, my dear cyber daughter!

And how did you know that Schubert's Serenade is one of my favorites which I played from my "Third Grade John Thompson's" songbook so long ago? I love its lilting melody; - and this rendition with flute and guitar truly touches my soul!!

Also I love the precious photo, blurry or not - of you playing the flute!!


ImKarn23 profile image

ImKarn23 4 years ago

wow...'controversial terms for flute players'? Who knew - certainly not I!

How is it that i can have great rhythm and NO clue about music. I couldn't find C on a piano..

Nellieanna sounds like a beautiful poetic musician - weaving lovely notes throughout her words - i am checking her poems out as soon as i leave your kind and generous corner of the hub!

Beautiful and imaginative tribute hub, Martie...

voting up and sharing forward..

have a great day - don't forget to vote...(unless you're republican.LOL)


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 4 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

Sista cannot vote in SA, darlin but I am heading out...as a humble representative oh who am I kidding...just wanted to say HI and and you will love Nellieanna.

Now excuse me, I have an election to attend!


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

My dear billybuc, thank you for being the first to attend Nellieanna's audition and for your much appreciated words of commendation :)


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

mckbirdbks, I've had the privilege to be the administrator/organizer of a music school, including several orchestras for juniors and seniors, for 20 years. Musicians are the most distinctive and delightful characters. Every orchestra needs a 'mother figure', and a 'father figure', the conductor, because as an entity the orchestra is like a child with many special needs. The 'age' or rather 'maturity' of the orchestra depends on its members.

To make a long story short, such an orchestra-child commands a lot of respect; to know each unique member and their circumstances, and to watch them all becoming ONE as an orchestra, rehearsing orchestrations to perfection, is a delightful, heavenly experience. I would LOVE to make NY Philharmonic Orchestra my baby :) Thank you for your lovely comment :)


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Oh, marcoujor, Nellieanna is indeed a LADY and for me the most admirable role-model. I adopted her as my mother in Cyberpace right from the start. One day, when I grow up, I want to be like her. Her songs and accounts touched my soul, and even deeper now that I am listening to one after the other while replying on these comments.

Maria, thank you so much for your UABI comment. Oh, and just for the record, thank you for being my darling sista in CyberSpace :)


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Thank you for coming by for the read, Mhatter, and for leaving me such a complimentary comment. Much appreciated!


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Hi my dearest Nellieanna, I can see you so clearly as a flutist, and I know you would have been one of the best of the best. You know the Ecclesiastes said that it is NOT the best athletes who win the races; all achievements depend on Time and Opportunity.

Like you, I had only the opportunity to play organ and piano as a child, and I had but only a year formal training because we unfortunately moved to a province where music was not part of the schools syllabus, but an expensive extra-curricular activity. However, while I was working at the music school I've grabbed the opportunity to learn the flute, but only up to Grade 5 (Trinity College/Royal school grading). Then Time just did not allow me to proceed. Schubert's Ständchen (in video above) was about the best I could do, but not even as good as the children. Developing perfect embouchure at an older age is just as impossible as developing supple fingers for the piano. So one day, playing in the senior orchestra, I felt like a dog when one of the Gr.7 flutists all of a sudden asked: "Who the hell is blowing so much wind?" Yes, musicians playing in an orchestra don't tolerate imperfection.

Nellieanna, I'll be right back with the rest of my reply...


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Nellieanna, my knowledge of music is purely general knowledge gathered in the presence of highly qualified musicians. They worked music, I merely played it. My fortes were in the admin department.

Music classes are indeed the cherry on student's cakes - not counting those forced by their parents. Quite a number of our ex-students don't hesitate to admit that studying music helped them rose above unfortunate circumstances in which they would/could have drowned. I am a keen advocate for music tuition. If I could have it my way, I would made the study of music and specialization in at least one instrument compulsory in all schools. (Voice is also an instrument, for those who are not interested in anything else.)

Thank you so much for your awesome collection of music, Nellieanna. I honestly enjoyed them all. So weird, 'Anything you can do I can do better' is also my choice for anger, and how wonderful to project one's anger into actually prove it as a fait accompli.

Thanks again, my dear cyber mom! You have passed your audition with distinction :)


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

ImKarn, so nice to see you in here! I am sure you would find C if you really wanted to find it. Lol! So often children with a high aptitude for music are simply not interest in music as a subject. Other things could be more appealing to them. We just can't do everything we are able to do. Oh, I am sure you will love spending time in Nellieanna's corner. Thank you so much for your comment.


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Maria, I look forward to hear the results of your election :)


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 4 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

I came to listen to some tranquil music with the long night ahead as votes are being counted and the NE braces for a Noreastern... with up to 4-inches of snow, 50-60 mile winds and possible power outages again atop the remnants of Sandy... a good time to dream of SA and be peaceful.

Have a good night's rest Sista and hugs as well to Nellieanna, Maria


Curiad profile image

Curiad 4 years ago from Lake Charles, LA.

What a lovely tribute to a wonderful lady and spirit! Nellie is worthy and your hub is worthy!

Mark


drbj profile image

drbj 4 years ago from south Florida

What a clever idea this hub is, Martie, and what a splendid collaboration has been produced by both you and Nellieanna - two very special and talented writers and musicians.

I am not a musician but I deeply appreciate music - all kinds of music produced by all kinds of artists. So here is a big thank you and an Up+ for your efforts.


Diane Woodson profile image

Diane Woodson 4 years ago from Evansville, Indiana

You covered each base of the Hub splendidly and I have yet to see a better more well thought out Hub in quite a while!!! you are very very good at what you do!!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Billy - I'm greatly pleased to read your approval. I agree that Martie's done a magnificent creation, both the idea of the orchestra and her own delightful way of presenting it! I'm honored to be a part of it!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Mike - despite her modesty, Martie deserves your praise as a musical magician and hub maker! In being part of this project, I deeply appreciate it!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Maria - oh my goodness, I'm liable to burst with delight and the honor of your complimentary support for both Martie and me. I'm especially pleased that you like my song selections, knowing how dear music is to you, especially as it fits and relates to feelings and people's personalities! Thank you. When choosing selections, I have such a long list of pieces I've so loved over the years, so I was happy to be able to choose the ones I chose with full enthusiasm and sense of their rightness.

I look forward to meeting the rest of the orchestra, too -so far your clarinet and my flute are a lovely duet! What fun!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Martin - you're so right! Marties' hub is indeed, impressive and is 'just right'! I'm honored to be a part of it.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Martie - Each time I read this hub, I'm more delighted with the lovely details and information it brings to readers! These hubs should be compiled into a book for wider readership!

I just love that the flutist in the main picture, when playing the instrument, is somehow smiling of necessity as she blows the breath into it! It's an example of how an instrument 'plays' its player!

In about fourth grade of public school, I remember that in music class, everyone was required to purchase a very simple little "woodwind" instrument called a Tonette. Of course, it was made of some 'common' material, neither wood or a fine metal. Probably hard rubber. I recently ran across my lesson book for it! If I know my mother, she probably saved the Tonette, too. I just haven't found it in her stash of stuff. :-) But it was admirable that the school provided kids even that much familiarity with that type of instrument. We weren't exposed to actively playing piano, though.

I may have told you - my lessons were the result of one of Mother's sneaky maneuvers to do what she wanted without telling Dad the details. She'd managed to buy a very small camper she wanted to use for her painting excursions; and then managed to keep it under wraps by exchanging with the piano teacher the use of it for her studio in exchange for giving me my first piano lessons! I was very little and can still remember how high I had to step up my short little legs to get into it when I stopped by after school for my piano lessons! It was parked on a small lot on Main Street, next to the Piggly-Wiggly grocery store! haha


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

ImKarn - same here. I'd no idea that the terms for flute players were matter os controversy, though in my own mind, I was never sure whether 'flutist' or 'flautist' was correct! How fun to find out the objections to 'flautist'! hehe

Do you use your sense of rhythm in dance? Well, I think you've said you have been a gymnast, which I'd think would require rhythm sense, as well as coordination.

Thank you for your kind compliments to both Martie and me. 'Music' is woven into my poetry even when it doesn't rhyme.

Been watching the election results. Looks like the vote is going the preferred way! ;-)


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Maria - ah, yes. That weather forecast for the NE on top of the damage already done to it is a nasty blow, I'm sure. I've been watching the voting results too. We're to get a little effect of the noreastern next weekend. May bring our first dip into the 30s.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Hi, Mark! thank you for your lovely comment! You're such a dear friend!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Dear DrBJ, yes, isn't Martie splendid!! Thank you so much for your gracious comment! You always say just the right things to make me feel great!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

DianeWoodson - thank you for coming by. You'e so right about Martie's expertise!

I just 'met' you over on your hubsite. I feel as though I know you, and it's a good feeling.


btrbell profile image

btrbell 4 years ago from Mesa, AZ

Beautiful detail, so many facts. I absolutely loved this. It felt as ethereal as a the melodies from the flute. When I was 8, I asked my parents for a drum set. They got me a flute. You can imagine the results. It did, though, give me an appreciation of the extreme talent and control that goes into playing a flute. Thank you for this wonderful hub!


Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

Gypsy Rose Lee 4 years ago from Riga, Latvia

Great tribute Martie and a wonderful musical journey. Enjoyed much and passing this on.


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 4 years ago from England

Hi Martie, what a fantastic hub! all about the flute and then the wonderful nellieanna, I haven't been over to read her wonderful poems for a long time, what a great reminder!


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

A wonderful hub Martie and thanks for writing on Nellianna; great work and I vote up plus share.

Eddy.


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

my dear marcoujor, I hope your night was not too long and your weather not too bad. SA cannot complain about bad weather conditions. Apart from occasional droughts or floods and a hailstorm or two, the weather is always nice. However, in politics winds and scattered thunderstorms often make me dream of a land where peace and harmony are the order of the day. Talking about rest - I am looking forward to a short holiday at the coast, starting on 19 November. Hugs to you, my lovely sista :)


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Thank you so much, Curiad. Expect me for a read in your corner soon :)


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

drbj, I've got news for you - You will be a musician in the Hubville Symphonic Wind Orchestra. In the meanwhile, thank you for practicing your instrument daily for the audition :) Thank you for your much appreciated attendance and comment :)


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Diane, I appreciate your opinion of this hub with all my heart. Writing is like gambling; we can't foresee our winnings and losses :)


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Nellieanna, thanks for your delightful ‘solos’ – Your replies are melodies with words. You might be interested to know about the project we have launched in the late nineties when the syllabus of our schools were changed to Outcome Based Education – a philosophy that had already proved itself as a myth. (So also in this department the current ANC Government is slowly but certainly re-incorporating the systems of the previous Government who actually only failed in its Apartheid philosophy, and just because of rigid, inhuman practices certainly not foreseen by the inventors of Apartheid. (As we have seen in Communism and Christianity – The road to hell is paved with good intentions).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outcome-based_educati...

So Music as part of Art & Culture was one of the compulsory subjects, but we foresaw the unfeasible outcome and offered, as an extra-curricular music centre, to take care of the Music division of A&C during school hours. Students who had passed the music aptitude test – according to Arnold Bentley’s method – http://www.amazon.com/Musical-Ability-Children-Its... was encourage to choose the right instrument according to the studies of Atarah Ben-Tovim and Douglas Boyd - http://www.amazon.com/The-Right-Instrument-Your-Ch...

The rest of the children we’ve put on recorders – an improved version of the tonette. We trained the groups on orchestral instruments separately from the recorder groups. Many students on orchestral instruments – actually, 99,9% of them - also enrolled for formal individual tuition at the extra-curricular music centre. They were stars and proved music tuition as highly successful, as they also became the best academic students and eventually leaders in Gr12 (matric). (It has been proved that the study of music is the only activity that develop both hemispheres of the brain at the same time and therefor improve children’s ability to excel in all academic fields, and especially in science and mathematics.)

The groups on recorders – the children with less than the required bent for music – were (accidentally) also those who had the less required bent for subjects in the academic department.

I was involved in the training of the groups on recorders and obtained during the 3 years we accommodated them my utmost respect and admiration for teachers. To discipline a group of children not really interested in learning anything, to get their co-operation, demands uttermost patience, determination, will-power and especially love. I take my hat off for all teachers, and I must add, after only 3 years of experience I no longer regret not becoming a teacher.

But in a way we have also achieved some success with these specific students. During their last 3 years in high school, when Arts & Culture is no longer compulsory and children focus on the minimum of six subjects required for the national diploma supposed to be obtained at the age of 18, I’ve heard so many of them boasting about the ability they once had to play a song on the recorder.

It is not what you can do for music, but what music can do for you.

I had to share this. Thank you, Nellieanna :)


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

btrbell, thank you so much for your lovely comment. We have learned that it is better to allow a student to start with the instrument of his choice, and then to encourage him to try the instrument that really suits his personality. Our goal is to win children for music and not to lose them by making them do what they don't really want to do.

Learning to play an instrument is certainly the best - and probably only - way to obtain a true, heartfelt appreciation of the extreme talent and control that goes into playing that specific and actually all music instruments. Children tend to think playing the drums is easy, while it is not at all easy to produce rhythm using both hands and feet at the same time. Not to talk about reading AND producing a composed/arranged part for the drumset :)


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Gypsy, thank you my dear friend. And also for the pimping :)


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Nell, I've giving up spending regular time scrupulously in the corners of all my friends. I have too many friends writing the most interesting and enjoyable hubs - I don't want to forget about any one of them. But a shortage of time compels me to skip some of their hubs with the hope that I will eventually get the time to catch up. Really, we are only flesh and blood. At this very moment I regret not having the time right now to hop over and read a hub or two of all who have delighted me in here with comments, as I have important financial statements to submit before Friday. Oh boy, and it is already Wednesday 8:50pm!

Take care, Nell!


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Eiddwen, my dear friend, thank you! Please expect me for a read in your corner before the end of the week. Always so nice to see you in my FB-feed :))


always exploring profile image

always exploring 4 years ago from Southern Illinois

Hello Martie, I'm listening to Waylon and tapping my toes as i type. This is beautiful. I loved hearing about Nellieanna's George and the doves. Her life has had it's ups and downs, yet she is able to smile and be happy. I feel a connection because of her love of music, i can't imagine a day without music. Clever idea, building an orchestra with Hubbers. Enjoyed..Cheers to you both..


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Hi my dear, Always, so good to see you in here. Well, doing only one audition per month, we might be able to give a performance for next year's Halloween :) I am so glad you enjoyed the read and the music.


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Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Hello, btrbell (Randi, as I just learned from a visit to your fascinating hubsite!) -I'm smiling about you @ 8 with your hope of a drum set dashed by a presentation of a flute! That's about as opposite an instrument as I can imagine! I'm so pleased to meet you!


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Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Rasma, you're so sweet. It is a lovely musical journey. Fun to participate!!! Thank you!


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Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Nell, you're a dear -- and thank you not only for your visit and comment ere but also for taking time to visit one of my hubs, too! It caused me to go to your site looking for poetry ;-) -- and finding so many valuable articles I want to read!


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Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Martie, dear CD. This reply of yours contains so much great information to add to that of the hub itself! The ideas relating to teaching are especially interesting. You know, I'm certified to teach at the secondary level (upper undergraduate grades 9 through 12, when students' ages average 14 to 18. My first husband was a 9th grade science teacher and what you said about the connection between aptitude for music & for scholastic subjects was something he fully recognized, enough to allow our two children to study piano and violin, though he lacked cultural appreciation himself. He was all about athletics, which may also have its influence on mental pursuits, both supportive and non-. I just love your statement: "It is not what you can do for music, but what music can do for you."


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Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Ruby, I so appreciate that your toes tapping to Waylon's rendition of "Waltz Across Texas"; -- and especially, your kind comments about my George & the doves, as well as my 'take' on life. Hugs.


Hyphenbird profile image

Hyphenbird 4 years ago from America-Broken But Still Beautiful

Nellieanna is an amazing lady, talented, beautiful and loving. I learned so much about her and about the flute. Then to listen to the smooth songs was icing on the cake. I love, love, love music and cannot carry a tune or play any instrument. I live vicariously through talented singers and musicians. This is a wonderful Hub, full of learning information and an interview with a precious lady.


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Nellieanna, you would be an excellent teacher!

Our music centre was eventually - after many years' efforts to convince the Government (Department of Education)n that music tuition is NOT a luxury but an essential educational subject, declared as an independent focus school for music in the beginning of 2009, open in the afternoons and early evenings. and no longer under the management of the adjoined public school. Unfortunately tuition fees are expensive and many highly talented children are not able to develop their talent. Thank you so much for your meaningful comments. Yes, I may use some of these comments in a hub focusing on the orchestra - the conductor's instrument. Take care, my sweet mamma :)


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

HI hyphenbird, good to see you! Thanks for your beautiful comment :)


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Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Brenda, your gracious comments are so appreciated! Thank you! The love of music is such a shared language! Martie is certainly bringing together and out the mutual love we all have for it with this ingenious series!


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Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Martie, Thank you! I like to think that maybe my calling to teach just didn't work out to be in the classroom. In fact, we are all teachers of our own ideas and philosophy even in the ways we live by them. We often underestimate our i-n-f-l-u-e-n-c-e! Our children observe and learn from it. Our friends & colleagues do so, as well. Even our detractors learn about us by the manner in which we respond to their attacks. We're all teachers in this sense.

It's such a shame when talented, even gifted, kids don't get noticed and helped to develop due to money issues. It's almost a crime, in fact. We NEED their contributions which may be blocked by such blockages.

I'm always attracted to articles, movies and shows which highlight and focus on people who buck the system to bring art and music within the reach of those kids, some of whom may just need to be recognized and encouraged, - not only in music but in science and other disciplines. The key elements in such stories are the individuals who put themselves out to DO what needs to be done to bring it into fruition. -- Like you!


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 4 years ago from Orlando, FL

Combined comment to the both of you...All throughout reading this beautiful tribute to Nellieanna our flutist, I was saying awwww. I was going to leave one long awww as a comment, but thought otherwise. I enjoyed this hub immensely. I remember way back when I crossed paths with the both of you lovely ladies. It was via a hub that you referred to Nellieanna as your cyber-mom, I knew then and I continue to know today that you both have hearts of gold. May the music continue to be imbedded in your DNA :)


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

My dearest, Sunshine, you know, of course, that you are one of my favorite relatives-in-CyberSpace - one of my sistas. I am in awe of the way you tackle and conquer adversaries on your path of life.

The most wonderful of playing a music instrument, alone in your bedroom, practicing your scales and arpeggios, or on stage giving a performance in perfect harmony with other musicians and an audience appreciating music, is the feeling of doing something awesome 'out of this nasty, merciless world'.

I hope I've already told you that I see a clarinet-player in you, meticulously and full of purpose reaching the top of all obstacles in her way to ultimate success. Not that a flute-player is without purpose and determination, but there is a difference in the way clarinets and flutists approach life and its challenges. Out of my fist I dare to say that a clarinetist normally knows exactly what s/he is doing when and where, while a flutist functions most of the time in auto-pilot mode with their heads in the clouds where everything is already perfect. I am not going to search for facts now - I am one of those who don't store facts in my head, but only links to the sources of facts - but I see the flutist as the one who leads the 'enemy' away and into a trap where self-destruction will be their lot, like that little guy (flute-player) in the story of the mouse-plague, and the clarinetist as the one resolving the Gordian's knot.

Take care, dear Linda. You are always in my mind and heart where I secretly feed you with my own courage and strength to fight the battles of Life. Of course, you don't know this - unfortunately I just don't have enough time on my hands to tell you this all the time.

5:00am now, and I am wide awake after I've literally passed out at 10:00pm last night, so damn tired of catching too many balls in the air.


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

My lovely CM, indeed, we are at the same time each others' students AND teachers. What a wonderful privilege to know you and to be able to learn from you. Since I've discovered the "Promise Land" called HubPages, I feel so sorry for all people in the past who have known and relied on only the handful of people in their immediate zones and perhaps also a library with a couple of books that could have given them ideas of alternative routes to success.

One of the biggest challenges in our music school, is establishing and maintaining bursary funds for talented and underprivileged musicians. It breaks my heart to see how much money goes into sport and games of all sorts, while music and art are not considered to be that important. The majority people on this planet are not able to realize and support the true value of music and other forms of art. What a topic for discussion via a relevant hub.

Have a good Friday, my dearest Nellieanna - I am ready to tackle mine with a vengeance.

Oh, BTW, I need an advance course in English. Is it IS or ARE for a MAJORITY of people..... Is it 'with vengeance' or 'with a vengeance'? Sometimes I just don't have an idea what I am doing.... But doing I am doing... LOL!


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 4 years ago from Orlando, FL

I feel your good vibes daily. I thank you and I send them back to you and Mr. B.

Have I told you that I played the clarinet when I was a wee one. If not I did now. I really never got the hang of it. Much love your way SAA.


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Sunshine, I put my head on a block that the reason why you could not get the hang of it was not because you did not have the talent or ability to do so, but because the Time do it was not right. Maybe you were too young, or maybe you've had other interests or distractions or n0 motivation....

I hate the feeling of failure I get when listening to accomplished musicians, realizing that I 'could have been' one of them if only I had the opportunity....

Take care, my dear friend!


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Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Hi, Linda! Your 'awwww' is very expressive! Thank you! It's such a treat to read your remembrance of your first crossing paths with Martie and me! I know just when that was. It was in August, 2011. We'd each written a hub in honor of the other and you wrote this comment in my tribute to Martie:

Sunshine625 12 months ago from Orlando, FL

"This is just sweet as honey, no even sweeter! I just discovered Martie tonight. I'm looking forward to following the both of you now. I can feel the love and admiration between the both of you. UP/AWESOME/BEAUTIFUL."

Linda, I was honored by it then and am honored by your comment now! Hugs.


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Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

How true, Martie! We have at our fingertips such an amazingly wide and various family and schoolroom in the internet.

I agree that the priority given sports - in many ways, including economic ones - as compared to the cultural is so out-of-whack! Deeply so.

I must share with you what I'll be doing Saturday afternoon. My friend, Val, and I will be going to the Dallas Museum of Art for a performance called "Music and Masterpieces", an interdisciplinary collaboration of the DMA and the Dallas Opera. It will combine an exhibition of Posters of Paris - Toulouse-Lautrec & his fellow artists and a performance from a French-Canadian soprano, including some 19th century French opera, art songs and Parisian bistro chansons. I can't wait! If you're interested, there's more detail @:

http://www.pegasusnews.com/events/2012/nov/10/2871...

English lesson: I believe that if a noun, though it represents more than one entity, is modified with a singular article, (either "a" or "the"), it can be considered as being referred to a unit, and the verb to use is the singular "is". ("The group is large." "The student body is outstanding." "The majority is for the plan.") That's how I choose the appropriate verb in such cases, anyway. And I think that whether one uses 'vengeance' or 'a vengeance' is subtly determined by one's intention. If it's more or less general vengeance for general wrongdoings, 'vengeance' suggests that; while if it's a very specific vengeance clearly aimed at a very specific wrongdoing, 'a vengeance' seems (to me) to suggest that more strongly. But as far as I know, there's no set rule for that choice. Context and the speaker's meaning sometimes must be the guides. Probably English language has more exceptions to rules and options than many other languages do, in which placement in the sentence must even be by the rules or else the meaning is derailed.


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Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

By the way, Martie: you do so well at it, I almost never remember that English isn't your first language!


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Aauuww, Nellieanna, thank you for posting Sunshine's first comment to us in here. I CAN'T believe it was only one year ago. Feels to me if I know you all forever.

What an enjoyable outing you're going to have on Saturday. I hope you'll consider writing a hub about the event. Thanks for the link - it brings you so much closer to me.

Yes, that English rule was all the time in the back of my mind. But somehow doubt took hold of me and, as you know, the brain register a mistake as correct after repeating it twice. That is why writers should always have their tools (dictionaries) at hand. And the same happened to 'vengeance'. Thanks for refreshing my memory, Mother :) I think I will remember this now for once and forever. Thank you so much for the well-needed compliment. I will never deny that I feel somewhat insecure writing in English, like walking on a slippery floor. But I will write, even if I have to learn Chinese.... Writing is actually my compulsive obsessive disorder.

Have a lovely weekend, Nellieanna! I'll be with you in spirit at "Music and Masterpieces".


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Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Martie - it feels to me timeless, too!

I'll certainly be apt to write a hub about the "Music and Masterpieces" presentation. Didn't mention it before I was really into it. I'm pleased that the link brought us closer. As I was finding it to include, I thought about that. It's a peek into my city's life. Wish you could be with me tomorrow!

Your writing in English is admirable. I would be 'hard put' to master writing in another language than my own! My writing would have to depend on good translators to appear in another language! But you - you write in English nearly flawlessly!


b. Malin profile image

b. Malin 4 years ago

Wow, Martie, What a Wonderful Hub, it had EVERY Thing! What a Treat to read and Enjoy! I played the 3rd Clarinet in the School Band when I was in Grade School. Having said that...I don't tell many People.

I have to say I Enjoyed how Nellieanna, that Beautiful Lady and Hub, Poet and Author was woven so nicely into your Hub. She must have been Thrilled. I can't wait to look at all these Great Videos as well.

I've voted this Hub, UP & All across the Board...Except for Funny.


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Hi b.Marlin, I can clearly see you playing the clarinet in the school band, though my gut feeling says you should play the saxophone. Mmm, I have to study you properly before making up my mind. I am so glad you enjoyed Nellieanna's audition on the flute. Take care and have a lovely weekend.


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tillsontitan 4 years ago from New York

To think I almost missed this fabulous blend of Martie and Nellianna! This is a musical piece in itself. The structure of this piece contains a certain melody of love and respect and like a musical piece each part is different...the background about the flute sets the tone while Nellianna's answers add depth and provide the harmony.

What a wonderful duo, Martie and Nelliana! Two truly great ladies.

Thank you for this beautiful composition!

Voted up, useful, awesome, and interesting.


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Hi tillsontitan, I am so glad you enjoyed Nellieanna's audition. I am still in love with her choices of music, and, of course, with the flute. Thank you for your lovely comment :)


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Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

b.Malin - That's a lovely comment, dear lady! I certainly am thrilled to have been treated so kindly and lovingly by our Martie! I hope you do get time to enjoy the videos. Thank you so much for coming by and commenting!


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Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Mary, dear friend! Thank you! Martie has done a magnificent job of the hub and the entire idea of the cyber orchestra! I'm looking forward t each new Hubber and the instrument chosen for them!


Break of Dawn profile image

Break of Dawn 4 years ago

What a lovely treat to have two beautiful, admirable, talented and classy ladies bringing me along on this enchanting musical journey. Mother and daughter in the cyber world - creating a delightful collaboration, using their brilliant mind and compassionate heart to make unforgettable and beautiful music. This is such a lovely hub and I can clearly see Nellieanna as the elegant flute-player playing poetic melodies from the flute. Reading about the doves and Nellieanna's beloved George was very moving and very beautiful. I loved the choice of music, it fitted perfectly into this wonderful read. Thank you and hugs to both of you.


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Hi Break of Dawn, I am delighted to know that you, too, can see Nellieanna playing the flute. Thank you so much for your lovely comment. Lots of hugs to you :)


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Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Dear Break of Dawn, what a treat and a pleasure to see you here and leaving an exquisite comment! Thank you for those words, especially sharing your response to my reminiscence about the doves in tribute to my George. It was one of the most moving moments of my own experience and is etched indelibly on my memory. It's hard to explain how close-by in a most 'normal' way he continues to seem to me, now over four years since then. Music was also a big factor shared in our life together. Thank you again, dear lady.


Genna East profile image

Genna East 4 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

I'm, I'm late...so sorry.

If there is such a thing as perfection in HubPages, this extraordinary hub reaches and surpasses the prize. Martie and Nellieana in wonderful concert. Nellieanna is so quintessentially the flautist.

“Flute-players are romantic, sensitive, creative and able to improvise. Even in precarious conditions they can escape into a fantasy world where all clouds have silver linings..”

Nell’s words and poetry capture this tone, this triumph of the human spirit, with lightness and grace that is so perceptibly Nellieanna. Superb hub!


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Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Genna, dear - I'm replying for both Martie and me, till she returns from a little getaway. Such a beautiful comment, though, I hardly know what to say, except -- thank you, thank you! I do adore the flute, though I don't really play it. If I had it to do over, I would. Thank you for mentioning that my words capture its tone. That is a superb compliment! I'm honored and humbled. Hugs.


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Genna East, always good to read a comment coming from you. Thank you for this beautiful one. I've just returned from a marvelous holiday and look forward to a read in your corner :)


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Oh, Nellieanna, you're such a darling, replying on my behalf as well. I have had a wonderful getaway, I wish it could have lasted forever. On my way to your corner.....


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Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Hugsssssssssss! So happy that you're back, but I can understand you'd like for it to have lasted forever!


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

So good to know you understand, Nellieanna.... :) May you enjoy a wonderful Sunday and especially while listening to flute music :)))) One of my favorites - http://youtu.be/pX3z7t6ajO4


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

"Air on a G-String" is one of my MOST favorite of all music and that flute rendition is especially lovely!! Thank you, darlin'!


kallini2010 profile image

kallini2010 4 years ago from Toronto, Canada

I have to say, Martie, that this series of yours is absolutely fascinating.

"Musicians say that a flute can do anything!"

Wind instruments are called "soul/spirit/breath" instruments in Russian. The reason why it is so hard to translate this word is that they are closely related. Spirit=soul, hence the word.

And the flute seems to be a perfect choice for Nellieanna.


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

kallini, I am truly thrilled because you are enjoying this series. Absolutely interesting - the Russians' view on wind instruments, and they are such leaders in this field. Could you please give me the exact Russian word for a wind orchestra. I am sure a master of ceremony could use it most effectively in his/her speech down here, during one of the orchestra's performances. (I remember how thrilled my children were when I told them the meaning of 'nada' - that I've learned from you.)

Good to see you up and about :)


kallini2010 profile image

kallini2010 4 years ago from Toronto, Canada

Martie - bear with me

The root of the word is "doukh"

======

дух m, noun

spirits

courages

breaths

ghosts

perfume

======

the word "soul" is not included in the translation because in the modern language the word is modified - "dou'sha"

but it comes from the same to breathe...

the correlation is clear - the wind instruments are the one played with the air coming out of the lungs, the spirit, the breath... which is the same as soul.

The term for wind orchestra is

Doukho'voy or'kestr

the instruments

Doukho'vye instrumenty - for properly transcribing Russian pronunciation I need the symbols for sounds, not Latin characters.

I am glad you liked the meaning of the word. Indeed they say that we only can understand our own language when we learn another one.

A lot of insights did not occur to me at all before I started learning foreign languages.

And now I always remember how my mother offered to register me in the musical school (I was six) and I categorically refused. Later I thought I had no good ear for it. Now I regret that I cannot play piano or sing. But who knows? Maybe a good tra-la-la something died in me!

There is a song, very famous

"The Wind Orchestra is playing in the City Garden..."

the very first line goes

In the City Garden ... is playing...

Wind Orchestra...

so you can hear how it is pronounced.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlWqSQbeie8

I hope it helps a little! Not as easy as "nada"!


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MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa Author

Oh, Svetlana, this is so very interesting! And so true, we learn more - and more in depth - while we teach. When I was a child I often played school-school with my dolls and everything structural in sight - even stones - imitating my teachers. I still remember a couple of difficulties I all of a sudden understood while I was teaching them to my dolls. I am sending this info about wind orchestra just as it is to my (ex)partner at the music school. He is a genius and a lover of languages, and especially languages such as Hebrew, Latin and Russian, and, of course, Music. He is a brilliant composer and arranger of music. Working shoulder to shoulder with him for 20 years was such a wonderful privilege and pleasure.

What an impressive song. He will surely love it. And most probably he will know something about it. He is a mobile encyclopedia.

BTW, have I ever told you that Fyodor Dostoyevsky is one of my favorite short story writers? Next to my bed is a little booklet, Poems in Prose by Ivan Turgenev I just love to read. I may have Russian genes, because I am so able to identify with characters created by Russian authors.

Thanks again, kallini, for sharing your knowledge with me :)


MrsBrownsParlour profile image

MrsBrownsParlour 3 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

This is beautiful and enriching and touching...I found this so appealing on so many levels; it's artistic and educational and intimate. I was sent here by Nellieanna, and loved seeing her as a flute! I was so touched by the dove story. I also enjoyed seeing "Anything You Can Do" and have to mention that I was lucky enough to see Bernadette Peters perform in this show (along with Luke Duke from Dukes of Hazzard which is how I loved him first).

Superb writing and sincere relationships at work...a pleasure to witness. :-)

~Lurana @MrsBrownsParlour


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MartieCoetser 3 years ago from South Africa Author

MrsBrownsParlour, I am so glad you came over and found this hub appealing. Attending live shows is surely the best thing a person can do for themselves. The memories are ever-lasting. Thank you so much for your generous comment :)


MickeySr profile image

MickeySr 3 years ago from Hershey, Pa.

. . . so, I'm just now discovering that you have a whole series of these orchestral contrary-anthropomorphic hubs (well before what's-her-name started calling me 'freckles'). It strikes me that just about all who know her would instantly ascribe Nellieanna the flute of your mortal philharmonic . . . in a word, sweet.


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MartieCoetser 3 years ago from South Africa Author

Hello, Mickey :) Good to see you in my corner. Yes, I am busy to assemble an orchestra, and will most probably ask you to play the 2nd, 3rd or 4th French horn. Go have a look at my hub about the French horn and let me know if you agree with me.

No, you cannot play guitar in a wind symphonic orchestra, unless.... We can always compose something for guitar and orchestra :)

Have a good day, Mickey :)


MickeySr profile image

MickeySr 3 years ago from Hershey, Pa.

Martie ~ while I very much hope folks haven't yet heard enough from me, I suspect (that between Maria's & Sunnie's interviews and Vicki's Aloe analogy) folks have likely heard enough about me.

It is a bit interesting (because I enjoy pursuing an understanding, insights, and expressions of character and personhood) to consider; to me, my thoughts go instantly to the clarinet . . . I've listened to Benny Goodman (who did a song called 'Don't Be That Way' chiding those who continually told him to just play what the people wanted to hear and to stop trying to do things his way) since I was little, what Clapton does on the electric guitar is essentially (in approach & ardor & proficiency) what Goodman did on the clarinet, and there is a bold, leading-the-way improvisational quality that, I think, the clarinet (in Swing music anyway) shares with the guitar (in Blues & Blues-based Rock, etc), a make your own music and let the chips of others' appreciation & acclaim fall where they may kind of character that I applaud and try to live up to just a bit.

. . . and, Benny Goodman was inspired & committed enough to have (and keep) the wild genius Gene Krupa on drums . . . you just don't hear anyone on drums, back then, like Krupa (the 1st Rock star) at the end of 'Don't Be That Way' ~

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnL0gB8iItI


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 3 years ago from South Africa Author

Mickey, I will never get tired listening to the unique sounds of music instruments and the technical challenges met by accomplished musicians. I can get lyrical over each and every music instrument on this planet. (Maybe not that much over electronic [electrical] stuff.)

Amazing how certain musicians just manage to bring an instrument to its right, or maybe the instrument brings the musician to his right.

Benny Goodman, the King of Swing ... Love his music! All of it :)


MickeySr profile image

MickeySr 3 years ago from Hershey, Pa.

". . . musicians just manage to bring an instrument to its right, or maybe the instrument brings the musician to his right"

. . . and whatever that is that happens, what we see (it seems to me) is musician and instrument as one . . . like, Eric Clapton just looks so right, so normal, so much like Clapton with a Strat wrapped around him sliding his fingers up and down the fretboard bending strings - like, he doesn't look right, he looks less like Eric Clapton on a chat show without a guitar hanging in front of him.

. . . although, my heritage is in fact French . . ? . . are there French clarinets?


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 3 years ago from South Africa Author

Mickey, of course, the instrument and its master are supposed to be ONE. I cannot think of any professional musician who are not one with his instrument.

I am going to find you a French Clarinet. Especially for you. You know, where there is a will, there is a way :) Have you read my hub about the Clarinet and the Clarinet Player?

In the meanwhile, take care :)


Venkatachari M profile image

Venkatachari M 3 months ago from Hyderabad, India

Wonderful hub. This is an apt tribute to our Nellieanna. She is a marvelous and enchanting Flute Player. I learnt a lot about the western flute instrument. I am accustomed to the bamboo flute of old days which I played during my childhood. But, now, I see what a change has been brought to that instrument. And thanks for this wonderful tribute to Nellieanna.


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 3 months ago from South Africa Author

Hi Venkatachari, I love the sound of the bamboo flute. Actually of all wooden flutes. Thanks for reading and commenting. Nellieanna is a very special woman, and adored by many.

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