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About Backlinks From Do-Follow and No-Follow Links

  1. aafergus11 profile image60
    aafergus11posted 3 years ago

    I'm new to internet marketing/blogging/niche sites so I generally browse through Google to find some good articles to read to boost my knowledge. Also I now know I can not only do this for educational purposes, but backlinking as well. So when I find an interesting article/blog, read it thoroughly, and make a comment, when it asks for my "website" can I put down my general hubpages website (ex: aafergus11.hubpages.com) and get links for all my articles? Or can I only put down a specific article to get a backlink for that article(ex: aafergus11.hubpages.com/blah-blah-blah-this-is-my-article)?

    1. Chinaimport profile image88
      Chinaimportposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      I am also a newbie to this.  I think it is more important to write a high quality, key word rich hub with well researched title and you will see that your individual hub quickly getting PR2 or PR3 with little promotion.  It will get you high SERP which is needed to get organic google traffic.

      I find that a meaningful comment will generally refer to a specific topic (of your individual hub) so it is better to get backlink for an individual hub.

    2. brianrock profile image89
      brianrockposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      In the title of the thread you mentioned "nofollow" and "dofollow," but didn't follow up with that in your post. That's going to make a big difference in whether or not blog commenting will help you at all in terms of SEO and search engine rankings.

      Most comments on blogs are marked "nofollow," and they have little to no effect on search engine rankings. Commenting on these blogs can be an effective way of engaging in a conversation. For example, you use a link to a related hub as your URL, and leave a good comment. The author of the post sees your comment, replies, and then might (along with other people) click on your link and visit it.

      If you find a blog that has dofollow comments (the comment links lack a "rel='nofollow'" parameter), then these will lend "link juice" to your link. These are good for SEO. In this case, it would be better to leave a link to a specific hub that is related to the topic of the post you're commenting on than to use the link to your HubPages domain.

      When you're building links for SEO purposes, you want to point those links to the pages that you actually want people to find in the search engine. No one is going to search for something and find your subdomain - they're much more likely to be searching for and finding individual hubs. So point links to the hubs, and the "link juice" will spread through your subdomain from there.

      1. Sapper profile image73
        Sapperposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        That's actually not the case any more. Google is taking a page from how they rank YouTube video's, and your SERP's will increase from any traffic you receive, so the more non search engine traffic you get, follow or not, will increase your ranks. Of course it won't directly increase it in the terms of a backlink, but it will still give you traffic.

        1. Paul Maplesden profile image88
          Paul Maplesdenposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          How will Google tell if you receive traffic from a site that isn't owned by them? For example if someone vists my articles from Scoop.it or something like that?

        2. brianrock profile image89
          brianrockposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          In which update did Google incorporate traffic into their algorithm...? I'm not familiar with any announced change along those lines, and I'd be interested in any follow up reading you could provide.

  2. Paul Maplesden profile image88
    Paul Maplesdenposted 3 years ago

    I would use whatever is most relevant to where you are posting; if you want to link them back to a specific article, use that, if you want to refer them to your body of work, then direct them to your profile page / subdomain. It will have more 'link / SEO juice' if you link back to a specific article, but linking to your subdomain does have some benefits.

    1. aafergus11 profile image60
      aafergus11posted 3 years ago in reply to this

      What are the benefits of linking to the subdomain over the article? Would that create backlinks for all my articles under that subdomain?

      1. Paul Maplesden profile image88
        Paul Maplesdenposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        I think brianrock gave a good answer to this above; in most cases, it makes more sense and will be more beneficial to link back to your specific articles rather than your subdomain as a whole.

  3. aafergus11 profile image60
    aafergus11posted 3 years ago

    Thanks for all the replies, but @Paul Maplesden nailed the answer I was looking for. I understand what nofollow and dofollows do, I was just wondering about what i should put for my website. But i got a lot more information than I was expecting. Thanks everyone!

 
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