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Spelling Issues on Related Searches Ads

  1. LCDWriter profile image94
    LCDWriterposted 4 years ago

    http://s4.hubimg.com/u/7990711_f248.jpg
    I know that I sometimes make typos.  I do try to go through and read back through my articles and change any errors.

    I have noticed that the Related Searches sometimes have major spelling errors such as the one I'm attaching.  I don't think most people are wanting to "Loose Weight."

    Is there anything that can be done to correct spelling errors in ads or are we just out of luck?

    Does it make the author look bad?

    1. LCDWriter profile image94
      LCDWriterposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      http://s4.hubimg.com/u/7990727_f248.jpg

      Here is a blown up image of the issue.  Maybe you can see this.

      1. galleryofgrace profile image81
        galleryofgraceposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I say insert a line at the end of the  hub indictaing that " the author did not place the following ads ".

    2. Simone Smith profile image92
      Simone Smithposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Hey LCDWriter! I apologize for any discomfort this may have caused.

      Related searches are drawn from commonly-used keywords, and may sometimes even be related to others' browsing history. This means that
      1. There amy be typos in the listings
      2. The listings may not be related to the text of the Hub, but rather the behavior of the reader

      I hope that helps to clear things up; I am not too concerned about the nature of the listings hurting our credibility as authors as I think its clear that it is an ad and not something the author created. I am fully aware, of course, that that is just my opinion.

      1. janderson99 profile image87
        janderson99posted 4 years ago in reply to this

        "I think its clear that it is an ad and not something the author created"

        Interesting that the justification for the income from Related Search Ads not being shared was that they were not ads, but links to HP pages like Topics pages.
        Now they are identified as ADS,  income should be shared under the Revenue Sharing Deal

        I remain very concerned about the "nature of the listings hurting our credibility" because they are not labeled as ADS and deceive readers.

        Why not label them as ADS like the others and share the income!
        http://hubpages.com/forum/topic/111781
        "call a spade a spade"

  2. Marcy Goodfleisch profile image94
    Marcy Goodfleischposted 4 years ago

    Good catch - hope we get an answer.  Although I'd love it if my weight were a bit looser.  Maybe it would fall off more easily?

  3. LCDWriter profile image94
    LCDWriterposted 4 years ago

    Ha!  Yes, maybe that's the goal! ;-)

  4. LCDWriter profile image94
    LCDWriterposted 4 years ago

    Well thanks for letting me know how those ads work.  I'll just try not to look at them!  I do realize that many people can't spell.

  5. Mark Ewbie profile image84
    Mark Ewbieposted 4 years ago

    Loose readers
    Loose income
    Loose credibility.

    They still annoy me.

  6. WriteAngled profile image91
    WriteAngledposted 4 years ago

    Why cannot we have an option to block what is shown on our hubs? I deeply resent the fact that it is possible for my hub to show a link to an advertisement produced by an illiterate scammer. This devalues my hub, Hubpages as a whole and my name.

    Is there a way I can repudiate the association I made on Google between my real name and my HP account? As a highly qualified professional, I really am not happy to be associated with the spam that is appearing in the misleadingly named "Related Searches" pages, regardless of whether or not this junk provides me with any earnings potential.

  7. psycheskinner profile image80
    psycheskinnerposted 4 years ago

    It's an ad in every way other than us getting paid for it.

  8. Marcy Goodfleisch profile image94
    Marcy Goodfleischposted 4 years ago

    I'm not real comfortable with the term 'related searches' for these things.  How many people go to their computers each day and eagerly search for ads?

 
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