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What grammar or punctuation errors do you make the most?

  1. paradigmsearch profile image86
    paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago

    Share, so others may benefit. smile

    http://memecrunch.com/meme/NB7F/dangling-participle/image.png

    Actually, I always catch them (as far as I know). It just bothers me that it keeps happening. I'm pretty sure the psychology is that the modifier doesn't occur to me until I reach the end of the sentence. Thus, having to go back and rewrite all the time.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dangling_modifier

    1. HollieT profile image87
      HollieTposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I think I'm ok with my danglers, but consistency put my i before my e after c. I usually catch this though.

      1. paradigmsearch profile image86
        paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        That reminds me. I recently discovered Chrome has a spell checker extension that is the same one Google uses on their search page. It even catches grammar errors. As good as MS Word's. And it is free.

      2. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
        mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I wouldn't worry about this too much in general. I found out recently that in actual fact the rule 'i before e except after c' is generally incorrect, and overall in the English language the 'e' does usually appear before an 'i' (even after a 'c'). Source : Stephen Fry, QI (Quite Interesting), a program on facts little known wink

        1. Victoria Lynn profile image88
          Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Some of the examples he gave didn't make sense, though. "Being" shouldn't be counted, as it is an -ing word. There is no question of an "ie" or "ei" combination. Same with hacienda, which is a Spanish word and sounds just like it is spelled for those who know Spanish. It would be pronounced totally different if the e were before the i. Species is plural and or course ends in "es." Interesting link: http://www.usingenglish.com/weblog/arch … 0021.html. With the rule applied correctly with the known exceptions (certain syllable combinations), teaching children the rule is helpful more often than not, as they will be correct about 90% of the time. Interesting.

          1. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
            mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

            The link you posted didn't work unfortunately (404 not found error).

            Re-the 'hacienda' word, I suspect that was the researchers fault as they no doubt didn't take the time they should have to get English words. As Stephen Fry explained when Alan Davies made that point, the fact remains that in the majority of cases (vast majority in fact) the 'e' does come before the 'i' after a 'c'. I am sure there is a more comprehensive list of all the words of both spellings online somewhere.

            Good list here that shows that the 'i before e except after c list' is not all that accurate:

            A
            abbacies
            aberrancies
            abortifacient
            accountancies
            accuracies
            adhocracies
            æquivalencies
            agencies
            agreeing
            albeit
            Alzheimer's
            ancient
            aristocracies
            atheism
            B
            bankruptcies
            beige
            Beijing
            being
            belligerencies
            bibliomancies
            biccies
            bureaucracies
            C
            caffeine
            choccies
            competencies
            concurrencies
            conscience
            conservancies
            consistencies
            conspiracies
            constituencies
            contingencies
            counterfeit
            currencies
            czarocracies
            D
            deficiencies
            deicide
            deify
            deign
            deindustrialize
            deity
            delicacies
            delinquencies
            democracies
            dependencies
            disagreeing
            dreeing
            dreidel
            E
            ecstacies
            efficiencies
            efficiency
            efficient
            eight
            either
            emergencies
            E cont.
            Excellencies
            excellencies
            exigencies
            extravagancies
            F
            Fahrenheit
            fallacies
            fancied
            fancier
            fancies
            feign
            feisty
            financier
            foreign
            foreseeing
            forfeit
            freight
            frequencies
            G
            geitost
            gesundheit
            glacier
            H
            heifer
            height
            heinous
            heir
            heist
            herein
            I
            idiocies
            idiosyncracies
            inaccuracies
            inconsistencies
            inefficiencies
            infrequencies
            insufficient
            intimacies
            inveigle
            K
            kakistocracies
            kaleidoscope
            keister
            L
            latencies
            lei
            leisure
            lieutenancies
            lunacies
            M
            magistracies
            meiosis
            mercies
            N
            neigh
            neighbor
            neighbour
            neither
            nescience
            O
            obeisance
            obeisancies
            obstinancies
            omniscience
            O cont.
            onomatopoeia
            P
            peine
            pharmacies
            policies
            prescience
            proficient
            protein
            R
            reign
            reignite
            rein
            reindeer
            reindustrialize
            reinforce
            reinstall
            reinvest
            reisolate
            reissue
            S
            safeish
            scarabaeid
            schlockmeister
            science
            seeing
            seignorial
            seine
            seismic
            seize
            sensei
            sheik
            skein
            sleigh
            sleight
            society
            sovereign
            species
            stein
            sufficient
            supremacies
            surfeit
            surveillance
            T
            their
            theism
            therein
            U
            urgencies
            V
            veil
            vein
            W
            weigh
            weight
            weir
            weird
            wherein
            whereinto
            X
            xanthein
            Z
            zeitgeist
            zootheism

            1. Victoria Lynn profile image88
              Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Yeah, but don't you see how inaccurate their list is? For example, all those words that sound like "neigh" shouldn't be on there. "Beige," for example does follow the rule. It is part of the rule and shouldn't be on this list. And words that end in "ing" shouldn't be on there if the "e" is right before the "ing" since it's not a dipthong in that case. The plurals shouldn't be on there, since the "y" is changed to "i" and "es" is added. It's not even an "ie" or "ei" word. Intimacies? Contingencies? See, those don't even fit. "Reinforce?" They obviously don't know language. Re-inforce. There is no way the "i" would come first. It's not a dipthong, either.

              They were definitely reaching when they made the list, as many of the words don't even fit. Words DO follow the rule more often than not. If all of the "ay" sounding words were removed as well as "ing" words and "plurals," the list would be much shorter. I think I may do that and see. Look at the "c" words for example. Most of them shouldn't even be on there. They don't have the dipthong. They are just plurals with the "y" changing to "i."

              1. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
                mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

                I certainly noticed a lot of the words were plurals which should not apply, and some of the other words were rather 'iffy', but as it was easier to copy and paste the lot I did rather than choosing them one by one. I still feel strongly that if the known words have been counted, and the words that do and don't follow the rule established by authorities on the subject, then it seems likely to be true that 21 times as many words do not follow the 'rule'. Stephen Fry himself is a known literary genius who would be the first to refuse to state something he knew not to be true. Whatever anyone chooses to believe, children are no longer taught this in schools for a reason, therefore the authorities clearly feel the rule is misleading. Also they never made any effort (from what I recall) in schools to teach children that there were so many exceptions such as plurals, foreign words, 'ay' sounding words etc, and this in itself would only have served to confuse children further as the rule would no longer be 'simple' to understand. Interesting discussion though smile

                1. Victoria Lynn profile image88
                  Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  Well, I still think it's totally helpful, and the "ay" sound IS part of the rule in schools. Nobody would even think to include the plurals, as the Ie or ei isn't even a part of the word. He should know that. He's just trying to throw that in there, I think, thinking that people won't notice.

                  Neither would foreign languages come into play. Sure, I think Fry is trying to make a point that the rule does have many exceptions, but that is true with the English language in every situation. There are no steadfast rules. It's a helpful rule in my eyes, and he is trying to prove a point that the evidence just doesn't support.

                2. Victoria Lynn profile image88
                  Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  Maybe I'll write a hub about it. :-) It IS an interesting topic.

                  1. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
                    mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    +1 Good idea smile

                  2. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
                    mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    Just in case you don't see it, the post I answered to Hollie T (above) has info direct from the QI website which might be very useful to you if you do write a hub on the subject. Also well worth checking out the SOWPODS list they used as a source, plus they mention that they didn't include plurals in their figures. The comment comes from one of the researchers and is very enlightening smile

              2. Victoria Lynn profile image88
                Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Just quickly taking off the obvious ones--words that sound like neighbor and weigh, plurals that DO follow the plural rule of changing "y" to "i", and "ing" words that have no place on the list, the words go to well under half. Some categories have none at all. I could also eliminate Alzheimer's and Fahrenheit since they are names. Some words are obvious, too, such as atheism, since we know that "ism" works but not "esm." I still think the rule is helpful. These people were stretching to try to make it not so.

                1. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
                  mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  In fairness I very much doubt that QI (a programme full of little known facts) based their research on one website such as the one I randomly lifted the list from (warts and all). I am sure an email to the programme's website could provide the source of their information and would be enough to clarify things. smile

        2. HollieT profile image87
          HollieTposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Misty, it's ingrained on me. Mrs. Murphy, my English teacher when I was seven, used to wrap my knuckles when I got it wrong. When I do so now it's like, she was right, I'm stupid!

          Good to know that she didn't know it all, after all. smile

          1. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
            mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

            lol, +1, bet you wish you could pull her up on it now wink (hope you watched the link I posted earlier, very amusing and makes the point in a very interesting way).

            1. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
              mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

              More interesting info on this from the QI website, Quote:

              "when we compiled those long lists of the words which do and do not obey the "rule", for sure a lot of them were words which are not in common usage.

              But in fact, this is true of both the words which do obey the "rule" and those that don't.

              I mentioned above that there are only six words in everyday use which really do have <cei>. One is ceiling - and OK, so everyone who saw the show knows that one! Then there are four verbs viz conceive, deceive, perceive, and receive and their associated forms. Since it is in common use as a noun independent of the verb, receipt can be the sixth. And that's about your lot.

              For <cie>, we have glacier (for some) and species which break the "rule" however we phrase it. And for <*ei>, where * may be any letter other than <c>, the list is a long one. Either and neither for many people, atheist for some, and caffeine, protein, seize, weir, and weird for everyone. There's no need to resort to words like phenolphthalein.

              So considering only words in everyday use, and only words in which the vowel sound in question is pronounced /ihmm, we already have more exceptions than instances. (Without even considering plurals and third person singulars in -cies - which never obey the "rule", but are rarely mentioned in those caveats.)

              No, the exposition of the matter presented on the show wouldn't do if we were writing a paper on the matter. Not because it is wrong; it isn't. But because it is incomplete.

              For instance, no one has yet queried the definition of "words in the English language", and for academic work we'd certainly need to explain which list we were using and why. (Just in case anyone was wondering, we actually used the 2006 version of the SOWPODS list, which exists for the purposes of Scrabble.)

              But this is televisual light entertainment, not a university!"

              The link to the actual relevant forum thread that goes into much more debate and discussion on the subject is: http://old.qi.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t= … mp;start=0

    2. Krista Schnee profile image75
      Krista Schneeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I always catch myself writing split infinitives. I know they're wrong, and yet I continue to write them.

      1. paradigmsearch profile image86
        paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Your posts caused me to boldly decide it was time I learn exactly what a split infinitive is. Turns out the definition is simple and easy. I learned something today.

        http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/sp … tives.aspx

        Good news. Excepting as otherwise indicated, splitting infinitives is not that big of a no-no. big_smile

    3. gabgirl12 profile image79
      gabgirl12posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I would have to say I forget comma's the most. I also have running sentences that I just can't seem to shorten. I try to read my hubs out loud. If I have to breathe more than once by the time I've finished it, its way too long.  Sometimes I repeat the words, which I catch when I proofread it.

      1. Stacie L profile image87
        Stacie Lposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I agree; my commas get me into the most trouble...wink

      2. Weekend Reader profile image78
        Weekend Readerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Apostrophes are a challenge too. They're just commas hanging a little higher on the page.

        1. Victoria Lynn profile image88
          Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Oh, apostrophes are easy! They show possession. Choose the subject first before adding the apostrophe.
          If singular, for example, one student would be the student's books. One student has a lot of books.

          If plural, several students have more than one book: the students' books.

          's for singular, s' for plural. Pretty simple, really. Any other questions?

        2. Weekend Reader profile image78
          Weekend Readerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Oh, sure, just when you think you understand apostrophes, you meet ... itses.
          It's is a contraction, for "it is."
          Its is a possessive.
          The itses fly in the face of all my elementary school grammarians taught.

          1. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
            mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

            +1, it took me years to find out you didn't use the apostrophe in 'its' when used as a possessive (unlike other words).

      3. Desmith3 profile image77
        Desmith3posted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Too many commas for me. Causes me to be a substandard writer at Textbroker, but in the real world it's never been an issue. smile

    4. Cantuhearmescream profile image82
      Cantuhearmescreamposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I have to admit, I have and addiction to commas and semicolons.... and I don't know how to stop... oh and whatever that (...) is, I can't stop doing that either! Someone please take away my buttons! Lol big_smile

      1. Victoria Lynn profile image88
        Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Addiction instead of addition? Commas instead of comas? Is that what you meant? I actually find grammar so easy, so message me at any time. I love grammar!

        1. Cantuhearmescream profile image82
          Cantuhearmescreamposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Oh my goodness, I can't believe I just misspelled two words while referring to my 'grammar' problems! Ha ha... yeah, thanks for pointing those out to me. Gee, I think I'll go bury my head in the sand now! lol

          1. Victoria Lynn profile image88
            Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Lol! Sorry! :-)

            1. Cantuhearmescream profile image82
              Cantuhearmescreamposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              No... no sorry... I'm laughing, honestly. Usually I tend to do these things when I'm being quick and careless, I appreciate it actually! big_smile

      2. Horatio Plot profile image82
        Horatio Plotposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I do that a lot too, cantuhearmescream...
        But then sometimes you feel you have to leave a thought just hanging in the air...
        Works well in forums though...

        1. Cantuhearmescream profile image82
          Cantuhearmescreamposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Ha ha.... perhaps I should spend more time here then... big_smile

    5. myefforts profile image84
      myeffortsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      For me, it's often the spellings rather than the punctuation. The auto-correct feature is there to help us out. But it does not work all the time. One example is the use of two words 'advice' and 'advise'. MS Word always misguides, at least I experience that, about which one to be used. I have often seen people following the advice of the auto-correct and using the noun (advice) where the verb (advise) needs to be used actually.

  2. nArchuleta profile image94
    nArchuletaposted 4 years ago

    I have a tough time spelling "remember" when I'm typing. It's not that I don't know how to spell it -- I never make the mistake when writing by hand. For some reason my finger always wants to add an "e" -- rememeber. I have a few words my fingers can't spell. Weird!

    1. paradigmsearch profile image86
      paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      My fingers always forget the second "m". I kid you not.

  3. seanorjohn profile image82
    seanorjohnposted 4 years ago

    I split infinitives. But like someone once said "When I split an infinitive I want it to damn well stay split".

  4. clara kish@yahoo. profile image62
    clara kish@yahoo.posted 4 years ago

    If I want to use Chrome  for grammar  checking I have to switch over to Chrome instead of Google. I can sure use the grammar checking,it has been a long time since I went to school and I have just about forgotten everything that I learned in English. Back then that was one on my favorite subjects. Thank you for putting this on here, I really appreciate it . Clara Kish

  5. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
    mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago

    My frequent mistake is to type 'teh' instead of 'the'.

    1. CarlySullens profile image87
      CarlySullensposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Me too!

    2. RetroDJ profile image71
      RetroDJposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I think we all do this!

      1. Victoria Lynn profile image88
        Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I do that, too! Why do our fingers want to type the "e" before the "h"???

  6. Victoria Lynn profile image88
    Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago

    I before e except after c, or when sounded like "a" as in neighbor and weigh.Most of the time it works. Sometimes not so much.

  7. Victoria Lynn profile image88
    Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago

    Many of these have that "ay" sound: beige
    deign
    eight
    feign
    feint
    freight
    heir
    neighbor
    reign
    rein
    surveillance
    their
    veil
    vein
    weigh
    Read more at http://www.usingenglish.com/weblog/arch … I0WIVIj.99

    1. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
      mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Great examples of why the 'i before e except after c' rule is so flawed smile

      Edit: I am a pratt as these don't have 'c's at the start, but the QI info is still accurate in the English Language.

      1. Victoria Lynn profile image88
        Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        But these mostly follow the second part of the rule: "or when sounded like ay as in neighbor and weigh."

        1. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
          mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Yep true, but it is also a fact that in the majority of cases the e does come before the i even after the c in the English language. Goodness knows why schools started (many years ago) telling the kids the 'i before e except after c' rule when in fact this is untrue.

          I confess I should have read your previous examples more thoroughly (looking for the 'c's) but I blame it on a couple of cans of cider and it being nearly 06.00am here lol. wink

          1. Victoria Lynn profile image88
            Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            LOL! Well, I think the full rule does apply much of the time, and it's a great way for school kids learning to spell to remember how to spell the majority of common words. I would like to find a list of words that don't apply to either part of the rule.

            1. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
              mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

              It would be a great rule for teaching children how to spell 'if' it were correct. This was what made the rule so bizarre when Stephen Fry explained that in the majority of cases it isn't true. This effectively means the schools were actively teaching kids how to make spelling mistakes more often than not when putting i's or e's after c's. On the programme they reeled off a load of words which did show the error of the rule e.g. glacier, species etc, but like you I would love to see a full list of great examples of the flaw in the rule just as an illustration.

              This is the clip from QI that explains it and gives the actual numbers of words involved i.e. 923 English words have 'cie' in them and therefore break the rule. Officially there are over 21 times as many words that break the 'i before e except after c' rule, and for this reason the 'rule' is no longer taught in schools. The link is worth watching because it is really funny and Daniel Radcliffe is one of the guests on that week's show:

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duqlZXiIZqA

              1. Victoria Lynn profile image88
                Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                But aren't most of those "cie" words 2 syllables? I don't even consider them when thinking about the rule. The rule has always helped me, because I think it covers a majority of certain types of words. I'll check out the link. Thanks.

                1. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
                  mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  Trouble is that when they taught this in schools they never said 'in two syllable words only' (and to be honest I never even thought about whether it mainly applied in two syllable or more words). Bottom line appears to be that in the English language 21 times as many words go against the rule as follow it, therefore to avoid confusion schools stopped using it as a teaching aid (no doubt to avoid whole generations of children spelling 'glacier' as 'glaceir' lol).

      2. Victoria Lynn profile image88
        Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Actually, this list does follow the rule (the second part of it). They have the "ay" sound as in "neighbor" and "weigh."

        1. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
          mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Totally agree re the 'ay' sound.

  8. Victoria Lynn profile image88
    Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago

    I'm a slow publisher on HubPages. I probably spend too much time on revising and proofreading b/c I don't want to have grammar or spelling errors. Sometimes I do catch stupid stuff when I read over old ones, though. :-(

    1. janshares profile image89
      jansharesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      +1 I'm obsessed with it, reading over and re-reading over my capsules in edit mode and in the preview box before I can press publish. And I refuse to use spell checker. Crazy!!

      1. paradigmsearch profile image86
        paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I've never used the HP spellchecker. My browser pokes me with a stick every time I misbehave.

      2. Victoria Lynn profile image88
        Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I don't trust spell-checker. LOL. I read my hubs over and over and usually go back for several days before I publish them! :-)

  9. Greekgeek profile image96
    Greekgeekposted 4 years ago

    Misplaced appositive phrases are my downfall. I know better, yet they litter my writing. I think the problem is that I keep thinking of things to add in mid-sentence, forgetting that they're separating a noun and its modifier.

    I wish we were all writing in Latin, so that our word endings could indicate which nouns and descriptives are linked no matter how far apart they are.

    1. queerlyobscure profile image85
      queerlyobscureposted 4 years ago

      My problem is typing completely the wrong word in response to something else I'm hearing or reading while I type, and then not catching it (I am a lazy proofreader).

      Also I have trouble with words that have 'g's in the middle. Legend, pigeon etc. I always want to add a d before it. I know it's wrong, but it feels so right!

    2. Jlbowden profile image83
      Jlbowdenposted 4 years ago

      When it comes to grammar, and/or pronunciation. I believe I have more issues with the grammar portion. Distinguishing when to use Then or Than, in a sentence. And also issues, of where to place a semicolon, or comma, at times can also be an issue for me.  Usually spelling a word correctly is never an issue for me. Unless I am using my Ipad to type an article, rather than the laptop.

        I find that I make many more spelling errors, most likely because of the smaller keyboard, when I type on my Ipad. But then again no one is perfect, especially when we fail to go back and edit our work. Which for the most part is plain laziness on everyone's part, including myself.

      Jl

    3. Barbara Kay profile image86
      Barbara Kayposted 4 years ago

      I have a problem with using commas when they aren't necessary. Back in school, I was an excellent speller and I'm shocked by how many words the spell checker catches now.

    4. brakel2 profile image85
      brakel2posted 4 years ago via iphone

      I always have trouble with effect and affect. I learn it and then don't use it, so it leaves my brain.

      1. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
        mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Me too, (big time).

    5. PaulGoodman67 profile image89
      PaulGoodman67posted 4 years ago

      The 'who' or 'whom', and the 'which' or 'that' issues can confuse me.

    6. PeppermintPaddy profile image71
      PeppermintPaddyposted 4 years ago

      Try having one word in your mind, but typing something else. Like you have "it's been raining in Chicago" and somehow your fingers type "it's being raining in Chicago." And you're like wtf?!

      1. janshares profile image89
        jansharesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        +1

    7. Kathleen Cochran profile image83
      Kathleen Cochranposted 4 years ago

      Myriad is becoming the "it" word with writers everywhere.  Its first use is as an adjective not as a noun.  You wouldn't say "It is a blue of dress."  You'd say "It is a blue dress."  So it is "myriad ideas" - not "a myriad of ideas".  If you are well-read enough to use this interesting word, you should use it as its first use defines.

      1. PeppermintPaddy profile image71
        PeppermintPaddyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        but even "a myriad of ideas" would be a noun.

        1. PeppermintPaddy profile image71
          PeppermintPaddyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Funny how that works. It can refer to a noun-myriad can be a noun rather than adj. "A number" of ideas" for example. "A myriad" of ideas. Both nouns with myriads being used as an adj.

    8. PeppermintPaddy profile image71
      PeppermintPaddyposted 4 years ago

      When you use it as an adj is tricky.

      1. Victoria Lynn profile image88
        Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Who is using it as an adjective? I don't think that's correct to do.

    9. PeppermintPaddy profile image71
      PeppermintPaddyposted 4 years ago

      Myriad can be both a noun and adj.

    10. PeppermintPaddy profile image71
      PeppermintPaddyposted 4 years ago

      Placing an  "a" in front of myriad turns it into a noun.

      1. Victoria Lynn profile image88
        Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Yes, I know that. I've just never heard of it being an adjective. That's new to me. Is it very common?

        1. Jlbowden profile image83
          Jlbowdenposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          So Victoria - the obvious answer to all of this, in your particular case. Is that you obviously prefer good grammar, over good taste.  Is this not true?  (;

        2. PeppermintPaddy profile image71
          PeppermintPaddyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/myriad

          Recent criticism of the use of myriad as a noun, both in the plural form myriads and in the phrase a myriad of, seems to reflect a mistaken belief that the word was originally and is still properly only an adjective. As the entries here show, however, the noun is in fact the older form, dating to the 16th century. The noun myriad has appeared in the works of such writers as Milton (plural myriads) and Thoreau (a myriad of), and it continues to occur frequently in reputable English. There is no reason to avoid it.


          To be honest though, I think, personally, that it's stylistically better as noun. It simply sounds better. "A myriad of ideas" sounds better than "myriad ideas" to me. Everyone is different, some prefer the adjectival sound better.

        3. Kathleen Cochran profile image83
          Kathleen Cochranposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I first discovered this lovely word in poetry, where it is commonly used as an adjective.  In prose and mathematics its common use is as a noun.  Don't think it is nearly as pretty, but it is not wrong.

          1. Victoria Lynn profile image88
            Victoria Lynnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            That's interesting. I think that's why I love language. It's so fascinating. :-)

            1. Kathleen Cochran profile image83
              Kathleen Cochranposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              It is.  There is much in language that is optional, not right or wrong.  You can have your preferences.  Those who have preferences different from miine might still irritate me, but they aren't mistaken.  I almost have more compassion for writers who make outright errors.  I can help them (used to be an editor) but those who disagree with me have a right to their opinions - irritating!!!smile

              1. PeppermintPaddy profile image71
                PeppermintPaddyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Well, in poetry it would make sense because you're compounding sentences. "A myriad of" wouldn't be smooth in poetry but I do prefer it in prose. Sounds a little Shakespeare to me-delicate. But that's the way I envision it.   "Myraid Ideas" does sound wonderful in poetry.

                1. PeppermintPaddy profile image71
                  PeppermintPaddyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  Sorry, I meant, "compressing" sentences.

                  1. PeppermintPaddy profile image71
                    PeppermintPaddyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    Not to say that it doesn't sound wonderful in prose either. Just preference.

    11. Gratitude Journal profile image61
      Gratitude Journalposted 4 years ago

      I'm a grammar boss.  But somehow I cant spell 'origional' no matter how many times I try.

    12. profile image0
      Beth37posted 4 years ago

      I don't pay much attention to apostrophes and capitals when Im on a forum. I make an effort when Im writing a hub etc. There are a few words that I repeatedly fail to spell correctly. They are not hard, but it's like I refuse to remember them.

      Chocolate
      challenge
      alcohol ...

      There's more, but I can't remember them now. I spelled all these right just now without spell check leaving me to think if I slowed down, Id do better.

    13. PeppermintPaddy profile image71
      PeppermintPaddyposted 4 years ago

      Since I have a degree in German, I often capitalize nouns because at times it's difficult to distinguish when you use the noun in English since the rules vary.

    14. PeppermintPaddy profile image71
      PeppermintPaddyposted 4 years ago

      And in German you always capitalize nouns because it's a more practical language. English if far from practical. It's like Heathrow airport, they throw a slew of everything in.

    15. PeppermintPaddy profile image71
      PeppermintPaddyposted 4 years ago

      Sorry, just to clarify, it can be difficult to know when to use the noun in English when you've studied German so much that it becomes your second language.

    16. janshares profile image89
      jansharesposted 4 years ago

      I'm always rushing and make the mistake with 'your' and 'you're.' I catch it most of the time and correct it but it happens more than any other for me. Other mistakes are not spelling errors but letters missing because, again, I'm rushing and don't check for mistakes. I don't know if it's dried food, drink, or dust but keys on the left side of desktop keyboard stick and cause incomplete words. (yuck) hmm

    17. HollieT profile image87
      HollieTposted 4 years ago

      I don't know if anyone else has this problem, but are there certain days where you just can't spell the most simple words, or even find the right words at all? You type and you know that the text is grammatically incorrect, you know it is, and you're searching for the correct sentence, or spelling- but just can't find it?

      But the following day you can, without even really thinking about it.

     
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