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DMCA results - working with the thieves

  1. wilderness profile image95
    wildernessposted 2 years ago

    I recently filed about a dozen DMCA's and have gotten pretty good results. A couple google or godaddy asked for more specific information as to where the problem text was on the site, but all but one have been taken down now and I expect that one to follow shortly.

    One site owner, however, sent a very polite email asking me exactly what was wrong; he had hired the site done by some "seo expert" and had no idea they had stolen anything.  His host had shut down the site advertising his business and he asked for a phone call, which I did. 

    During the call, after showing him where the problem was, he apologized but said I should have called because this had cost his little business.  I told him I had left a comment on his site a month ago, but he said such comments were just deleted as they never applied to his site and I should have called.  I restrained myself and politely ended the conversation.

    Does anyone take the time to call the thieves and ask them pretty please to take their stolen material down?  I just don't have the time for that, feel it would not be effective in any but a very few cases and don't really care if some thief out there loses business because I got their host to shut them down.  I may or may not leave a comment on their site before filing with the host, but never, ever make a phone call.

    1. Writer Fox profile image80
      Writer Foxposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      I have never made a phone call to a plagiarist.  He's responsible for what he posts on his site and if he ignores comments, he's too stupid for words.  Fortunately for all of us, the companies who host the sites will do the right thing when you file a DMCA.  There's no excuse for stealing the work of others and you don't need to converse with these people.

      Just a side note:  Some people never learn.  Plagiarists just keep on doing what they do no matter how many warnings or DMCAs are filed against them. The word 'copyright' is not in their vocabulary.  And these are the same people who never understand why they never make any money on the Internet!

      1. wilderness profile image95
        wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        A "plagiarist" is it?  Guess I'm not polite enough - "thief" is good enough for me, and an accurate description.  IMHO

        And some don't learn because that's how they earn - by stealing.  We (the HP community) have had to chase some for weeks as they simply closed one site and opened another before they figured out to leave HP alone - that wholesale scraping of HP just wasn't a viable proposition. 

        I've only had one host refuse to take action, and finally got the Swedish govt. involved - that did the trick.  It amazed me that they would actually listen to such a minor matter, but the host and site owner were both thieves and they probably had hundreds of complaints.

    2. Mary McShane profile image90
      Mary McShaneposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      1. This is the internet and we communicate via the internet.
      2. If he hired someone to create his site, he surely has no interest in the results of that site or he would  have either a) seen your comment or b) been a bit more vigilant as to the content and where the designer acquired it.
      3. IF I ever were to make a phone call (and that is a very big IF), I cannot guarantee that I would be cordial, even toned, and devoid of curse words.  Judging from my past record with plagarists, I just don't have it in me to be nice in any communication.  It is all I can do to "ask" them to remove my work when I feel I shouldn't have to "ask" in the first place. I should be allowed to demand.
      4)  CNN removed my article today and sent me an email to notify me.
      YAY!!!
      I could not have done it without the help of Writer Fox and wilderness. I mean that sincerely.  Thank you!

      1. wilderness profile image95
        wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        That's great to hear - that CNN took your work down!  Success is sweet, doubly so when it's ruining a thief and quadruply so when it's a big company that doesn't want to listen to a peon they stole from. 

        I've have a handful of thieves that really didn't understand.  One poor soul swore up and down that anything on the web was free for the taking; it took a word from his boss to convince him otherwise.  Even being sent the act itself didn't work.

        Another was a group of school kids making a school project.  Same thing - they think it's all free for the taking.  I felt sorry for them after ruining their school project, but the lesson learned was probably more valuable than the grade they would have gotten.

        These people I feel sorry for and will work with them, but still want it DOWN.  I'm just willing to play teacher a bit and explain why.  Most thieves I don't even care enough to leave a comment on - just complain to the host in the hopes they will be shut down permanently.

        1. Mary McShane profile image90
          Mary McShaneposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          The reporter at CNN is no longer employed there. She left their employ about 3 weeks ago and after I saw my article copied there, I looked at several other articles by her.  She stole them too -- from wikinut and Expertspages (where I also write). 

          @ playing teacher. Sometimes I'm just too mad to play teacher. Ok, not sometimes. All the time. And like you, I don't care if they lose their site or not.

          @ CNN - no apology but I'll accept what they wrote.
          Hi Mary,
          This email confirms that CNN.com has received your notification of claimed infringement under 17 U.S.C. § 512 (c)(1)(c) and has removed or disabled access to the material that is claimed to be infringing.

          1. wilderness profile image95
            wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

            I wouldn't expect more than that.  If CNN admits to theft, you could sue and you could re-publish their admission on the open web.  Either reaction would be quote bad for CNN.

            Take their notice for what it is - a tacit admission of fault - and be happy with it.  And have a drink to celebrate beating out the big guys this time!

            But I care a great deal if the (professional) thieves lose their site - that is the goal!  That and losing their adsense, amazon, and whatever other affiliate accounts they have.  It's just the little guys, like the one today, that I don't really want to hurt - they trusted the wrong person to make their site, they got burned by it and that's enough.  Bet they pay more attention in the future, and they did say they've fired the guy.

      2. Writer Fox profile image80
        Writer Foxposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        Hooray!  Another plagiarist taken down!

        1. Mary McShane profile image90
          Mary McShaneposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          http://s2.hubimg.com/u/8771813_f248.jpg

          1. Writer Fox profile image80
            Writer Foxposted 2 years ago in reply to this

            +1

    3. Marisa Wright profile image93
      Marisa Wrightposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      No, I have never called the thieves.  Most of the time they're not in Australia so the cost would be unreasonable!   

      I've had a similar situation a few times with small business owners, who have paid someone to create their site.  Luckily I've been able to find a contact form on their site and use that to notify them before having to resort to reporting.   

      The suggestion that it's your responsibility to call him is ludicrous, IMO.  It's his site, and regardless of who he got to create it, it's his responsibility to manage it properly!

      1. Writer Fox profile image80
        Writer Foxposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        I'm having a bit of a problem dealing with a plagiarist in Australia right now.  The laws are different and the DMCA is an American law. I usually don't encounter this from Australians!

        1. wilderness profile image95
          wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          I don't recall dealing with an Aussie yet - guess the home repair people there are all honest!

          But it surprises me that they don't want to hear about the DMCA.  While it is technically an American law, it was written to implement the WIPO, which IS worldwide.  I have to wonder if you just ran into an ignorant Aussie - one that thinks the web is all free for the taking like so many others do.

        2. Marisa Wright profile image93
          Marisa Wrightposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          Australian law is stricter than US.  If you use the standard DMCA you should have no problem getting it taken down.

          1. Writer Fox profile image80
            Writer Foxposted 2 years ago in reply to this

            This is the host:
            https://www.aapt.com.au/

            We have tried contacting using their contact form, but that is just for clients and we received no response. (Or, the dingo ate the email.)  They don't seem to have an email address for copyright complaints.

            1. Mary McShane profile image90
              Mary McShaneposted 2 years ago in reply to this

              Looks like another site that wants to use snail mail and personal phone calls (address and phone numbers are the only contacts).

            2. Marisa Wright profile image93
              Marisa Wrightposted 2 years ago in reply to this

              That is slightly bizarre because I AAPT isn't well known as a web hosting service here, except for big business.  If you want to PM me, I may be able to do some detective work for you.

      2. wilderness profile image95
        wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        I kind of feel bad for these small business owners (mine was just that as well).  They don't know any better, they have hired someone to help them out and gotten burned as a result.  They are, in a way, in the same fix we are; the victims of a thief, for them a thief that has sold them stolen material that they must now give up after paying for it.

        1. Marisa Wright profile image93
          Marisa Wrightposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          Agreed.   Like I said, I've been lucky that I've been able to contact the site owner using the site's contact form and get it sorted out amicably.   A couple of them even paid me for the use of the article (I charged $50).

        2. Suzanne Day profile image96
          Suzanne Dayposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          Well I found out yesterday at my work that the previous graphic designer had pinched recipes from anywhere on the web to throw into a recipe book for the company. Needless to say, once I worked that one out, I told management we couldn't use them (totally plagiarised, word for word with pictures and all).

          They accepted it no problems. Looks like that it's the level of work required and the pay that causes the problems. I suspect the last designer was paid peanuts and was told to invent recipe books with no help or even any ingredients....but this only goes to show you just how common it is in Australia.

        3. aa lite profile image91
          aa liteposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          It is fairly easy to check using copyscape, whether the work is original or not. He should not pay for it, until he checks it. It is possible that he was simply unaware of the whole content stealing, copyrighting problem, but, honestly, if you are going to start a business, then you should learn about it, no?

          And it is quite probable that he hired the writer from a freelancing website, and paid him peanuts. People who get paid properly for their work, have a reputation to consider, so I very much doubt they would steal content.

          Imagine, if I just decide to copy beautiful pictures from Pinterest to put on my Zazzle designs, Zazzle gets a complaint, and removes my products. I bet you nobody would have much sympathy if I started crying about my business being shut down.

          1. wilderness profile image95
            wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

            I don't think so, aa.  I don't expect a baker to know the inner workings of his delivery truck engine, and I don't expect a business owner to understand the ins and outs of the internet.  That's why they hire specialists, after all.  They hire lawyers, designers and engineers.  CPA's, HR specialists and CEO's.  Because they can't know it all. 

            And they probably did hire the guy for peanuts - that seems the going rate for that - although I've had thieves that run a physical SEO business, storefront and all, and have made hundreds of sites.  Still stealing my work to put on "fake" sites designed to increase the ranking of the site they built.  The customer never knew, never saw the copied stuff - just saw his site, built by the thief, quickly rise to the top.

            1. aa lite profile image91
              aa liteposted 2 years ago in reply to this

              I guess you have a point. It's just when I think of content thieves, I think of people who work online, rather than brick and mortar addresses that have a website.

              According to the DMCA instructions on HP, we should email the DMCA to the website owner before taking further action. I think calling is excessive, but an email is more likely to get noticed than a message on the site, assuming an email is available of course. But you can usually get the email of the site owner from whois, and since I assume you have to check whois to get the name of the host, then it is doable.

              So I guess the proper 'etiquette' is to email the site owner first, then contact the hosting company.

              Mind you the kind of stuff I write about just gets stolen by scrapers, and emailing them is totally useless.

              1. Writer Fox profile image80
                Writer Foxposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                Many of these people have no contact information on their sites.  On purpose.

                1. aa lite profile image91
                  aa liteposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                  Indeed, I have noticed that. But usually the information is on whois, no? My webhost keeps telling me every year that I am required to provide make sure my info. is current. Also, if they have Adsense, I think it is a requirement that they provide a contact method.

                  If they don't have contact info. then obviously they can't be contacted. But Wilderness was discussing a situation where the site owner was unaware that the content was stolen. Presumably since the site was for his 'real world' company, there was going to be a way of contacting him.

              2. wilderness profile image95
                wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                I'm afraid I'm not very polite, then.  While I might leave a comment in the comment section of an article if I'm in a real hurry at the moment, that's fairly rare.  Usually I just file a DMCA with the host and forget about going to the site owner.

                1. aa lite profile image91
                  aa liteposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                  Well, given that your content was stolen, I don't think the onus is on you to be polite. Ultimately people are responsible for the content on their site. I mean I can see how some people just hire somebody to make them a site, and don't know much about it, but if the content provider used photos from one of the big image sites, and they decided to sue, he would be liable.

                  But  I think the optimal 'protocol' is to email the DMCA to the site owner first, assuming their email is available.

                  1. wilderness profile image95
                    wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                    Yeah - that guy in the OP, wanting a phone call, got under my skin some.  He messed up, not me, and to demand that I call the hundreds of thieves and ask them to pretty please take my stuff off their site was beyond the pale.  I made the call (and I returned his email, showing exactly what was wrong) was more than enough -  to search the site for a phone number and then call in the first place is ridiculous.

              3. Marcy Goodfleisch profile image92
                Marcy Goodfleischposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                The idea of politely asking the major, wholesale scrapers to stop stealing your content & remove it sounds about as useful as diplomatically telling a burglar that theft is against the law. Yeah. Right.

                1. aa lite profile image91
                  aa liteposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                  Indeed. But Wilderness shows that some people might 'steal' content inadvertently. As in they hire a freelancer to make them a site, and don't know enough to check that the content is original. I can see how that could happen.

                  1. Marcy Goodfleisch profile image92
                    Marcy Goodfleischposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                    I had that happen with one of my hubs (the same one WF just alerted me that was again stolen.  The guy had purchased it from someone.  I posted that info earlier in this thread (and I had contacted the guy personally).  The major scrapers, though, are another story.

                2. Marisa Wright profile image93
                  Marisa Wrightposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                  I think it's usually pretty easy to make a judgment whether to contact the site owner, or go straight for the jugular. 

                  A site which has stolen one article may have made an honest mistake, and I always try to contact the site owner in that case. Like I say, I've actually been paid by such sites a few times, so it's worth the effort!

                  A site which is obviously scraping large numbers of articles from various sources - obviously beneath contempt and doesn't deserve any kind of warning.

    4. Marcy Goodfleisch profile image92
      Marcy Goodfleischposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      I discovered one of my best-performing hubs (about dating scams) on the site of a private investigator in a Latin-American country.  Unlike most sites with stolen content, this one had a phone number, and it was a USA one, so I called the person.  He's an ex-pat  who makes his living by helping to track down such scams. 

      He said he had paid someone $50 for the piece, with everything transacted online (someone contacted him & said they could write something that would 'help improve' his website).  He was apologetic and immediately removed it, and was also angry he'd been scammed.  I believe he was telling me the truth.  He tried to track down the person (they were supposed to be in Australia), but they'd changed contact information. 

      Sadly, the traffic to that hub, as well as several others that were copied elsewhere, has never returned.  I'm not happy about that at all.  I'm sure, in addition to the elaborate scraping software, there are many people selling our work and presenting it as their own.  Makes me ill.

      Usually, I just file the request with Google, but it was clear this was an isolated piece of content, not my entire account.  And, there was a phone number.  It worked faster than Google (the guy removed it while we were on the phone). 

      Also, I'm not real sure what Google can do other than getting things out of searches.  It can take forever to contact hosts (which is still the best way to get an entire site removed), but as we know, the scrapers just jump ship and get another host. 

      All in all, I'm tired of the game.

      1. Mary McShane profile image90
        Mary McShaneposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        If I were you, I'd pressuring him into giving you the name of the person (organization) he paid for the piece, who probably got the job through a group or website subscription (or job board).  If possible, we might be able to celebrate because with that name or website that offers content for sale, we now have a "source" to start figuring out why we are getting copied so much here and by whom.

        It's a long shot, but we gotta start somewhere.

        I hate this constant pursuing of plagarists. It is mind and body weary and I find I'm getting little results following the rules for takedown.

        I'm glad this worked out in your favor and with very little problems.

        1. Marcy Goodfleisch profile image92
          Marcy Goodfleischposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          Thanks, Mary - I did try to get the name, but he wouldn't release it.  And after several attempts, I reached the point of diminishing returns for that effort. Also, why would a thief give him their real name?  My impression was that he was trying to research the person due to the scam played on him. Once he realized the contact info was no longer good, he stopped messing with it.  I'm not even sure he had an actual name - I can't recall.

          It's been quite a while back, so no use spending energy now. I did tell him that whomever had done that was likely stealing more content from others on our site.  But even if we had the name he was given, we would not know who it really was. 

          That experience was at least an improvement over the blatant scrapers who steal hundreds of hubs and take forever to get shut down. 

          Scrapers have cost me many hundreds of dollars.  I'm tired of it, and I truly feel HP should intervene, regularly monitor for copied content & take action.

          1. Writer Fox profile image80
            Writer Foxposted 2 years ago in reply to this

            Hi Marcy,
            You need to have the cache of the plagiarized content removed (delete spaces after : )
            cache of http:  //www.woshibaile.com/how-to-spot-online-dating-cons-and-scams-and-how-to-avoid-them

            cache of http:  //www.woshibaile.com/author/root/page/12/. It i

            And, I hate to be the one to break the news, but you've been ripped off again:
            https:  //www.facebook.com/sams.uddin.9822/posts/485838588193602

            1. Marcy Goodfleisch profile image92
              Marcy Goodfleischposted 2 years ago in reply to this

              Oh, crap.  Thanks, WF.  I'm so sick of dealing with this.

              1. Writer Fox profile image80
                Writer Foxposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                I know.  I'm glad you saw that post.  I was getting ready to send you an email.  (Remember, on Facebook you can also post a comment that the work was plagiarized, but file the DMCA simultaneously.)

                1. Marcy Goodfleisch profile image92
                  Marcy Goodfleischposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                  I'm trying to get to the page while logged in - I'll report the guy to FB.  Thanks so much for letting me know.

                  1. Writer Fox profile image80
                    Writer Foxposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                    Go get 'em!

      2. Marisa Wright profile image93
        Marisa Wrightposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        When you file a request with Google, all that happens is that they'll take that article out of their search results.  They can't do anything else, unless it's on Blogger (in which case they can take the blog down) or they're showing Adsense ads (in which case they may ban them from Adsense, if there are enough complaints).  So your content is still on all those sites, and the spammer is still happily posting other people's stuff, oblivious.

        I know it gets tiring, but in the long run, it does pay off to file with the host.  True, some spammers may go to another host, but some will get discouraged - and even the most determined spammer will give up eventually if he's chased from host to host.  Most hosts do have a standard DMCA reporting format and they do respond, so it's no harder than filing with Google.

  2. IzzyM profile image85
    IzzyMposted 2 years ago

    You do not want anyone in China to steal your work! I went through that hassle a couple of years ago, and lost! China Daily claimed my work and got away with it, and they are such a big site about a million other Chinese stole it too.

    I finally unpublished, and when I did, my traffic picked up. (This was the last hub published before my infamous 'Google slap".)

    If I'd had the money for a lawyer I would have sued them, but I didn't and had to drop my case when Google told me I needed a lawyer to take it further.

    I would advise anyone here that if someone in China steals your work, let it go, unpublish and lose it.

    Even the mighty Google will not take China on.

    1. wilderness profile image95
      wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      Yes, China is a special case.  Hopefully the rest of the world's government will push the issue hard enough some day to get them on board, too.

    2. Suzanne Day profile image96
      Suzanne Dayposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      I'm only guessing, but if this were to happen, do you think hanging onto the hub because it is older than the "republications" might be a goer? One day, Google might have the ability to prevent duplication on the web and the oldest article will win for authorship.....just throwing this idea out there....

      1. wilderness profile image95
        wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        The problem is that in the meantime google dings us for having duplicate work even though it knows which one is the copy.  At least google usually knows; sometimes it is scraped with minutes or hours of being published, and before google has even seen the hub.

        1. Suzanne Day profile image96
          Suzanne Dayposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          I understand and agree. I came across something unusual when I did my last cleanup though. The first original hubs of mine were spread far and wide in article spinning Wordpress sites, then that practice suddenly vanished after a certain time period for every other hub after that time. I'm assuming this might mean that Google somehow decided to not publish spun articles after a certain month/year, which means it might be slowly getting smarter....and one day might be able to distinguish original authors properly.

          1. Writer Fox profile image80
            Writer Foxposted 2 years ago in reply to this

            Serial plagiarists eventually loose their AdSense accounts and their ability to use other advertising programs as well. AdSense and Google Web Search have even included a place now to report "serial offenders."  Unfortunately, new content thieves pop up every day, trying to illegally profit on the work of others.

          2. wilderness profile image95
            wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

            Except for blogger, google does not publish articles, stolen or not.  Hubs, for instance, are not published by google, but by you, using the services of HP and their server company.

            1. Suzanne Day profile image96
              Suzanne Dayposted 2 years ago in reply to this

              I stand corrected in my choice of words. What I meant was that Google didn't show spun articles in search results after a certain time period. Since these spun sites were made by 100+ people, I'm assuming that while some of them probably lost their Adsense accounts, Google must have become smarter too.  I agree with Writer Fox too that if we hit them where it hurts, they won't have any reasons for doing it.

              1. wilderness profile image95
                wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                I have doubts about the intelligence of google. sad  While they have made statements about what they want to do and where they want the web to go I've seen precious little in the way of results in spite of causing great harm to millions of the little people.  Google is far more interested in their own pocketbook than in doing what is right for the net.

                But there is another problem as well - even if google does remove those things from their SE, there are lots of other SE's.  Not as big as google, not as effective, and not used nearly as much, but still a considerable force on the net.

                Best method is to get their affiliation canceled.  Adsense, Amazon, anything that can earn them money.  They will re-coup with false ID's, but it takes time and eventually they will learn not to mess with you.  It's just easy to get those things canceled; Amazon doesn't seem to care much and while google will work with you it takes time and they are not real responsive, either.

                1. Suzanne Day profile image96
                  Suzanne Dayposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                  I will keep in mind your comments. Yes, hitting them where it hurts looks like the best way to kill it off.

                  1. wilderness profile image95
                    wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                    I'd love to cost them all their affiliation, but nearly always have to settle for having the site taken down until they've removed my stuff.

      2. viryabo profile image85
        viryaboposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        I really can't wait for this to happen.
        I have many to send DCMA reports out for, but i don't have a clue as to how to proceed. Yes, i checked out and read how to do it, but those i have sent out reports for still have the red copyright symbol. I must be doing something wrong.

        1. wilderness profile image95
          wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          Mine still have the symbol, too.  You can always check to see if the copy has been taken down by doing a google search for a snippet of text.  HP does not scan your hubs every day for duplicates; it may take a long time for the red symbol to disappear.

          1. viryabo profile image85
            viryaboposted 2 years ago in reply to this

            Thanks. i checked, and the site is still up and running. With Google ads too . . .

            1. wilderness profile image95
              wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

              The next question is who did you send the form to?  The site owner or the host? 

              Because no professional thief is going to pay a bit of attention to whatever you say, but their host will.  The host, having stolen material on their servers and being honest, will almost always take action to eliminate that content.

              You can also file with adsense - with google.  The ad has a place to file on, but it takes considerable time to get reaction there.  Same with Amazon or other affiliates - they stand to lose money if they end the affiliation contract.

            2. Writer Fox profile image80
              Writer Foxposted 2 years ago in reply to this

              Has your content been removed?  If not, what is the website?

              1. viryabo profile image85
                viryaboposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                It's still there Writer Fox.
                URL - http: // fastfashionblog.com/2012/12/sexy-and-fat-female-models-career-plus-size/
                Thank you so much.

                1. Writer Fox profile image80
                  Writer Foxposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                  The website is hosted by websitewelcome.com, a reseller of Hostgator hosting.  Go here and fill out their DMCA form: http://www.hostgator.com/dmca. Hostgator is a reputable company and will always remove plagiarized content.

                  You can also send an additional DMCA request to abuse@websitewelcome.com.  If you don't know what to say in the email, send me an email and I'll forward the correct text.
                  http://writerfox.hubpages.com/#email

                  1. wilderness profile image95
                    wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                    Yes, I've had excellent results with hostgator.  Fill out the form right, giving them what they legally need to see and they are all over it.

                  2. viryabo profile image85
                    viryaboposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                    Thank you so much Writer Fox. I really appreciate this. Will send it off right away. I do use Hostgator too and yes, they are very reputable.
                    I do have a format for a DCMA request which i use all the time (i just insert a name/offending URL). Thank you for this.

              2. viryabo profile image85
                viryaboposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                I notice the Adsense ads have been removed. It was there earlier on!

                1. wilderness profile image95
                  wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                  Be careful now, you don't your tears of pity for the thief to ruin your keyboard! big_smile

                  1. Writer Fox profile image80
                    Writer Foxposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                    I think she was just surprised that advertising has been removed.  My guess is that someone else reported the site to AdSense.  Everything I looked at on the site was content from other sites.

  3. Moon Daisy profile image83
    Moon Daisyposted 2 years ago

    I'm glad people are having luck with DCMAs!  smile

    I wonder if anyone has an opinion they could give me on this plagiarism issue.  A health website stole one of my hubs.  As I couldn't find an address to email them, I wrote in their comments section that the hub was stolen and it was my original work, and I asked them politely to take it down.

    Instead the person responded by acknowledging me at the bottom as a "guest-writer", and adding some links to my other work!  They also left another comment apologising and saying that hadn't realised, and asked me if I was happy with the acknowledgement.

    Up until now I didn't understand how they'd possibly not realised that they'd stolen my work!  But if they'd bought the content, or even employed somebody else to write for them then I see that this is indeed possible.

    I didn't respond to them as life got in the way, but I notice they've now removed my comment and their reply to it.

    Weighing up the pros and the cons, I'm not sure whether to leave it or not.  Is it worth leaving it for the possible hits I might get from the links on their page?  Or would I be better off overall making my hub unique on Google (from an ads or a HubPages point of view?)

    Thanks.

    1. Suzanne Day profile image96
      Suzanne Dayposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      If it is a duplicate copy of the article, it will hurt your traffic. If it is only a sentence or two with links then it might be useful for backlinks. Google doesn't like duplicate copies and puts them in the "omitted results" as well as downgrading your subdomain (sometimes Google thinks you copied it from their site - it isn't smart enough with the authorship date yet). So if they have copied the entire thing, definitely file DMCA and hit them with everything you've got. Don't bother being too polite, these people are responsible for theft of your hard work and it looks like this bunch have decided not to remove it, as well as hiding your comment.

      1. Moon Daisy profile image83
        Moon Daisyposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        Thanks Suzanne, it's really useful to know all of that.  Yes, it is the whole article, and I will ask them to remove it.  Hmm, at first I thought it was sweet that they put my links on their page, (I know, I'm rather naive, lol!) but then they removed my comments.  They obviously don't want people to know that they had a stolen article on their site!  Will get to it...

        1. wilderness profile image95
          wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          I will add that it is almost a guarantee that filing a DMCA with the site owner in this case will be useless as they will ignore it.  File with the host - the vast majority of hosts are more than willing to take down illegal content.

    2. Marisa Wright profile image93
      Marisa Wrightposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      Definitely pursue them!  It sounds as though they posted a few links to placate you, and now they think you've forgotten about it, they think they've got away with it.

  4. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 2 years ago

    I used to be quite active as an illustrator so from time to time I search and send out notices (Thank God for tineye).  There are a lot of naive people out there.  I try to be patient as most will eventually understand that they need my permission to use my work.  I have only had to go after the webhost three times and and once when that did not work I contacted the companies advertising on the site.  I can't really afford to sue people but I get rather stubborn when they will not be reasonable.

    My fear is that the longer an copy of the work is up unattributed, the more people are finding and taking it.  You have to defend the work these days as there are these "orphaned work" clauses that say if the maker of the work is hard to find, it becomes legal to take it.

    1. Writer Fox profile image80
      Writer Foxposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      Most plagiarists I find are not naive, though certainly some are.  Most are scum and won't remove plagiarized content until they are forced to do so.  You are absolutely right to diligently protect your work.

  5. Anna Marie Bowman profile image91
    Anna Marie Bowmanposted 2 years ago

    I have one site where no matter what I do, DMCA, comments, emails, nothing gets done. They won't take it down. I have no clue what to do from there. It's through one of those sites where they sort of host it, but don't claim any responsibility and won't do anything if you contact them.

    1. Writer Fox profile image80
      Writer Foxposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      What is the site?

      1. Anna Marie Bowman profile image91
        Anna Marie Bowmanposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        http hmm/movie- streaming.org/ blog/ (spaces inserted).

        It's strange, because now, when I click on DMCA, the page locks up. It won't let me do anything.

        1. Writer Fox profile image80
          Writer Foxposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          Send a DMCA request to: abuse@bluehost.com

          This site is hosted by Bluehost, through UnifiedLayer (a reseller of hosting services).

          1. Anna Marie Bowman profile image91
            Anna Marie Bowmanposted 2 years ago in reply to this

            Thank you! I will do that.

  6. Everyday Miracles profile image92
    Everyday Miraclesposted 2 years ago

    I just found one of mine here:

    mydrivefm.com/onair/the-mayor-pete-kennedy-46334/writing-a-valentines-day-letter-12060417/

    I've sent an e-mail. Here's hoping they take it down. This is one of my top performing hubs on all my accounts and I don't want to have to strip it down, rewrite it and re-produce it. It was stolen on the 12th according to Copyscape.

 
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