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WARNING! Beware of calls asking for YES or NO answers

  1. Don Bobbitt profile image93
    Don Bobbittposted 5 months ago

    Yesterday, I saw a warning on a major news channel where they mentioned a new scam here is how it goes;
    1- you will receive a phone call where the people ask something like; "CAN YOU HEAR ME?"
    2- once you answer YES they hang up.
    3- They have already stolen your basic information so they then charge something against your account.
    4- When you contact them to cancel the charge, they cn day you gave them permission for the charge, and will play back their recording of you saying YES.

    This is a scam, so never answer calls from strange phone numbers, and never say "YES" to protect yourself from this scam.

    1. mike102771 profile image84
      mike102771posted 5 months ago in reply to this

      Wow! What is wrong with people. Basic humanity has gone out the window. It's like that scene from The Godfather where they said "it's only business" to excuse doing things such as killing each other.

      This is just another reason why I don't answer my phone anymore. All calls are sent through the answering machine with call backs for people that matter. Maybe those kids that text instead of call on to something?

    2. FitnezzJim profile image88
      FitnezzJimposted 5 months ago in reply to this

      I saw this news also, and started looking for ways to deal with it, above and beyond diverting to an answering machine.

      I noted two actions that seemed reasonable.

      First was to get a Security Application that detects phone numbers not in your personal phonebook and plays a recorded message indicating the number has been given to a Law Enforcement Agency.  The writer claims this was effective.  But it also seems like you might be misrepresenting yourself.

      The second thing, if you fall victim to the fraud, is to contact the credit card company, let them know you were scammed, and to file a fraud report with your local Police Department or Sheriff to indicate you are willing to support that claim of fraud in Court.  I’m guessing this would be effective since I suspect fraudsters are not the sort that will show up in court to further their fraud.

    3. kenneth avery profile image81
      kenneth averyposted 5 months ago in reply to this

      @Don . . .
      Thanks so much, my friend. I get these somewhat comical calls from "Microsoft" by people speaking in foreign tongues, not that this
      is bad, but one called me and got upset for he wanted me to confirm
      that I was who he was calling.
      I said, " we can sit here all day, but unless you tell me what you want,
      we will grow old holding the phone."
      I heard him exclaim, "Oh, God!" in English, and then that CLICK of a receiver hanging up.
      Ahhh, small justice beats no justice at all.

      1. MizBejabbers profile image88
        MizBejabbersposted 5 months ago in reply to this

        Kenneth, those computer calls are also a scam. We got one one day and my husband told him that his computer wasn't even on (it wasn't) then cussed him out.

    4. MizBejabbers profile image88
      MizBejabbersposted 5 months ago in reply to this

      I saw the same story, or a similar one on a major news network, and they said that some people had been entrapped. I notice that some of the commenters are debunking it. I say, "ladies, you can do what you want, I for one, won't fall for it." I agree with FFC, if I don't recognize the number, I don't answer it. Also, if the caller only rings once or twice, I know it's not legit. Legitimate business people know to let a phone ring several times.

      1. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
        DzyMsLizzyposted 5 months ago in reply to this

        The thing is, not a single person has, in fact, lost any money from this, which, if it were an actual scam, they would have.

        If the caller were asking for personal information, that would be a whole other thing.  But nothing is being asked but the initial question, to which there is only a one-word answer.  Then, the caller hangs up! (Gee--I wonder what would happen if you answered, "no."  ???  lol )

        Nothing can be gained by this; it's merely another crank call, to waste peoples' time and play stupid tricks.  I suppose this is today's version of our generation's youthful stunt of calling people and asking questions like, "Is your refrigerator running?"  To which a "yes" answer brought the stupid reply, "Well, you'd better go catch it!"  Followed, of course, by hanging up and collapsing in a fit of giggles.
        (Mind you, I'm not saying I ever did this.... )

        But I do believe that's all there is to this current nonsense.  I have more important things to worry about.

        1. Don Bobbitt profile image93
          Don Bobbittposted 5 months ago in reply to this

          You are very WRONG on this one, I'm afraid. It is a confirmed scam. Go to snopes and check, please. We have enough wrong information being spread on HP by some writers for one of us to discount true information.
          DON

          1. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
            DzyMsLizzyposted 5 months ago in reply to this

            Please re-read my comment.  That's exactly what I said, that it's a SCAM, and the SCAM is the not the phone call, but this stupid warning about nothing!

    5. peachpurple profile image78
      peachpurpleposted 5 months ago in reply to this

      thanks very much for your warning, I never pick up weird number phone calls

    6. Rachel L Alba profile image84
      Rachel L Albaposted 5 months ago in reply to this

      Hi Don,  I heard about this also, this morning on the radio.  Thanks again for bringing this to our attention, I would have forgotten.  This is a crazy and scary world.
      Thanks again, Rachel Alba

    7. Rachel L Alba profile image84
      Rachel L Albaposted 5 months ago in reply to this

      I actually got this call yesterday and was very glad I heard of it before hand.  As soon as he said, "can you hear me", I did hang up.

  2. FatFreddysCat profile image95
    FatFreddysCatposted 5 months ago

    I have a simple system to avoid scams like this: I don't answer calls from numbers I don't recognize. If it's someone who has legit business with me, they can leave me a message and I'll call them back. If they don't leave a message, then I know it was a B.S. call.

  3. Kryssy OSullivan profile image85
    Kryssy OSullivanposted 5 months ago

    I thought so!
    I have had quite a few of those calls. I had one like that last night, at 10pm. And it has been the same... A guy saying he was from my local police district, asking for donations, and if I could hear him. I also had one where they claimed to be from one of the local ambulance companies in my area.
    I figured it was weird, because even I asked who it was, it hung up on me. Calling back sometimes lands me on a voicemail.

    Anywho...
    Thanks for sharing, about this!

  4. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 5 months ago

    Sounds like a myth to me.  Bots can tell a person is saying yes rather than no, they cannot tell who that person speaking is.  Your voiceprint has no security value whatsoever, to you or to scammers.

    1. kenneth avery profile image81
      kenneth averyposted 5 months ago in reply to this

      smile @ psyheskinner.

    2. FitnezzJim profile image88
      FitnezzJimposted 5 months ago in reply to this

      All true, of course.  The second half of the scam appears to be when the person who is the target of the fraud has the recording replayed for him, and is told he was recorded saying "yes" to whatever charge was put on his account,

      1. psycheskinner profile image81
        psycheskinnerposted 5 months ago in reply to this

        That wouldn't happen because voiceprints are not used for identification purposes, pins and passwords are.

        1. Don Bobbitt profile image93
          Don Bobbittposted 5 months ago in reply to this

          You know this, and I know this, but a lot of our fellow Hubbers are not very tech competent. That's why I placed the warning.
          DON

          1. psycheskinner profile image81
            psycheskinnerposted 5 months ago in reply to this

            My point is that the warning is not needed because the threat is not real.

            There is zero evidence that anyone is recording people, or that having the recording would help with any attempted fraud.

            There is every reason to believe they are not and it would not.

            Let me put it this way, if your bank or any other entity with power over your money will carry out any transaction at all because some who sounds just like you telephoned them, you need to change banks right now because yours is not following Federally mandated laws and regulations in relation to identity protection and money laundering.

            1. RonElFran profile image95
              RonElFranposted 5 months ago in reply to this

              After ABC News reported on this last night, the same report was given on NBC News tonight, and they gave examples of people who claim to have experienced unauthorized charges on their credit cards because of this scam. So far I've seen reports on this from ABC and NBC. I think the weight of evidence so far is that this is something people need to be warned about.

    3. MizBejabbers profile image88
      MizBejabbersposted 5 months ago in reply to this

      I saw the same story, and apparently it is trapping some people. Unless you are a lawyer, do you know how much it costs to fight it?

    4. RonElFran profile image95
      RonElFranposted 5 months ago in reply to this

      I just saw a report on this on the ABC evening news. They take it seriously, and recommend that viewers do so as well. Even if the voice print has no legal value, I'm sure some victims are being intimidated by it into paying what the scammers demand. BTW, the Nuance website claims, "Voice is actually the most secure form of identification because each person's voiceprint is unique."

      1. psycheskinner profile image81
        psycheskinnerposted 5 months ago in reply to this

        Not a single bank or major consumer service is using voiceprint, not  single cent has been lost to someone using it as described in this report.

        This whole thing is a myth.

  5. julieann26 profile image81
    julieann26posted 5 months ago

    You  can (and should) always check these things out on legitimate scam and hoax sites like Snopes.

    Here's the link to what Snopes have said about this scam...

    http://www.snopes.com/can-you-hear-me-scam/

  6. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
    DzyMsLizzyposted 5 months ago

    I read about this yesterday on Facebook.  Snopes debunked it; no one has ever actually lost any money, or been fraudulently charged for goods not ordered.

    The REAL scam is this foolish warning, itself!

    1. psycheskinner profile image81
      psycheskinnerposted 5 months ago in reply to this

      Indeed, and then anyone who gets a call from someone with a cell phone in a bad reception area reports that they have been a "victim" of it.

    2. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image92
      TIMETRAVELER2posted 5 months ago in reply to this

      Not true.  Our local TV news outlet interviewed a woman who was scammed this way recently.

      1. psycheskinner profile image81
        psycheskinnerposted 5 months ago in reply to this

        They interviewed a woman who got a call from someone with bad reception and attributed it to the new urban myth.

        Not a single cent has been lost because it is all just paranoia. Feel free to link me to any reputable report to the contrary.

  7. Safari Chic profile image75
    Safari Chicposted 5 months ago

    Thanks for posting this information.

  8. mattforte profile image91
    mattforteposted 5 months ago

    The best part about this "scam" is that some genius thought up the story to see how far it would go.

    "I wonder if I can make this go viral."

    And so it has, even though it isn't even true. They're sitting at their desks laughing at all the  idiots spreading the information, and hanging up on the people that call them that legitimately ask "Can you hear me" when they have a shoddy connection. And everybody who says "Yeah it happened to me and I hung up" just add to the so called "validity" of the case because they assume that these people are asking the question to scam them, rather than actually asking if they can hear.

    The mastermind behind this has taken "trolling" to a whole new level of epic.

 
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