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Duplicate Flagging

  1. 0
    Greta Lieskeposted 7 years ago

    If you write a Hub involving the influential quotes of a famous person, will the hub always be flagged as a duplicate because of their actual quotes?

    1. Maddie Ruud profile image83
      Maddie Ruudposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      If it's a hub full of quotes, with little or no commentary, then yes.  If it's just a few quotes here and there, or one long chunk, with a sizable amount of unique content along with it, you can email me at team(at)hubpages(dot)com with the URL of the hub for a review and I'll manually clear the warning.

  2. livewithrichard profile image85
    livewithrichardposted 7 years ago

    It probably depends on how much you are quoting.  If you are quoting an entire speech they probably yes it will get flagged, but if you are quoting bits and pieces and then commenting on it, you shouldn't get flagged.

    Legaly, here in the states, I don't think you can quote more than 300 consecutive words because of copyright protections.

    1. LondonGirl profile image90
      LondonGirlposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Depends, surely, on the age of the speech? You wouldn't run into trouble quoting, say, Elizabeth I.

      1. livewithrichard profile image85
        livewithrichardposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Yes you are right.  Here, everything is protected for the life of the writer plus 70 years.  But works that are already in the public domain are fair game, however that does not account for duplicate content.

  3. girly_girl09 profile image77
    girly_girl09posted 7 years ago

    I published a Marilyn Monroe quotes hub a month or so ago and paired it with a tribute video that I made to get youtube traffic (so far only two visits to my hub from youtube, but hey - I tried! lol) . It got automatically flagged at first but then I went through the quotes and seperated them into different categories that I thought up (on life, in the bedroom, etc) and added an intro paragraph. Took care of the duplicate problem and it's a unique quote page for her as it's rare to find quotes by her separated into different categories.

  4. girly_girl09 profile image77
    girly_girl09posted 7 years ago

    As long as the quotes were said in the public (to a crowd, media, paparazzi, a friend, in line at the grocery store, etc.) they are typically not protected by U.S. Copyright law.

    There are some exceptions, such as the estate of Martin Luther King, Jr., which owns the copyright to his famous "I Have a Dream" speech for another 30 or so years. Of course, you can still use it under the Fair Use Doctrine.

    Sometimes, it can be a gray area, but there shouldn't be any issues of using celebrity quotes that were spoken freely in public. As long as they are not from movies, lyrics, books, etc., I can't imagine you'd run into many issues. If you're really concerned, consult an attorney.

    Obviously, quotes from more recent movies, lyrics, etc. are protected by U.S. Copyright law.

    1. livewithrichard profile image85
      livewithrichardposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Of course you are right, but I think the concern was with duplicate content and the already printed word.

  5. 0
    Greta Lieskeposted 7 years ago

    Thanks for all the help! I published a hub of the words and quotes of Virginia Woolf and never had a problem...but I just did the same thing with Lucille Ball and it got flagged as a duplicate. I will have to go back and maybe change some things around.

 
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