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Does Logic Prevail Over Emotion?

  1. marinealways24 profile image61
    marinealways24posted 7 years ago

    Life in general, how often do logical decisions prevail compared to emotional illogical decisions?

    1. Drew Breezzy profile image80
      Drew Breezzyposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      emotions most likely occur over logic

      so logic prevails every once in a blue moon? haha

      1. marinealways24 profile image61
        marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Emotions are the opposite of logic.

        1. Davinagirl3 profile image60
          Davinagirl3posted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Sometimes emotions correspond to logic.  Acts of violence and malice are never logical.

          1. marinealways24 profile image61
            marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Maybe they would be logical if you had to take a life to prevent one from killing?

            One more example of emotions: If a leader of a country disrespected the other leader, the emotional reaction of the disrespected leader could literally start a war if that leader had an ego, absolute power and acted on emotions.

            1. Davinagirl3 profile image60
              Davinagirl3posted 7 years ago in reply to this

              The question there is: "is killing always an act of malice?"

              1. marinealways24 profile image61
                marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

                When done without logic! lol

    2. Davinagirl3 profile image60
      Davinagirl3posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Some people have a very scewed version of logic.  They can justify anything they do.  I say emotions prevail.  How many times have you said something, or did something, in the heat of passion that you couldn't take back?  It is easier to appear illogical, than unemotional.  Emotion packs a punch.

      1. marinealways24 profile image61
        marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Ahh, maybe we are talking in a different sense. I believe someone with the logic you mention is arrogant and close minded. I am talking about logic which is open to debate.

        I would like to add a couple examples of how emotion can be bad: If a man walks in and finds his wife in bed with another man, the man could have an emotional reaction from the heat of the moment and murder the man his wife is sleeping with.
        If the husband would have walked away and got away for a few days, would he have still made an emotional reaction?

        If a woman is constantly cheated on, physically, emotionally abused, if the woman stays with the man, is she using emotion or logic? I believe in most cases emotion would be holding the woman to the abuser. My logic would tell me to get out if things were bad enough.

        1. Davinagirl3 profile image60
          Davinagirl3posted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Are you asking if a person with a good sense of logic, acts logically moreso than emotionally?  If so, I believe, YES.  I think logic is a good filter.

    3. anjalichugh profile image86
      anjalichughposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Well, very few times. It should be the other way round (logic prevailing over emotions) but it's not.

      1. marinealways24 profile image61
        marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        !!!!!

      2. marinealways24 profile image61
        marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        In Law, is law decisions based on logic or emotion?

        1. Davinagirl3 profile image60
          Davinagirl3posted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Propoganda feeds on fear.  Fear is a very dangerous emotion.  Propoganda feeds the legal system.  Quite syllogistic, eh?

          1. marinealways24 profile image61
            marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Would you say that fear are politicians best friend? lol

        2. anjalichugh profile image86
          anjalichughposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Legal provisions have no place for emotions but the Judges, in some cases, are entitled to use their discretion. This is where their decisions may seem to be based on emotion even though they project otherwise. smile

          1. marinealways24 profile image61
            marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Unfortunately, this is what I figured on the Judges behalf.

    4. andromida profile image74
      andromidaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I think mostly it depends on if you are a emotional or a logical person and of course the appeal of the situation .

      1. marinealways24 profile image61
        marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Andro, Thanks for responding, however I have no idea of the point you made or was trying to make, no disrespect. lol more detail please.

        1. andromida profile image74
          andromidaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Logical and emotional decisions reflect both the state of mind  and the level of reasoning power a person.If a person is logical minded then its most likely that he or she will prefer
          logical decision over emotional decision nd vice versa.But sometimes situation becomes so complicated that even a logical person become prone to illogical emotional decision.

          1. marinealways24 profile image61
            marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Ok, understood now and I agree. Thanks for explaining.

    5. Neil Sperling profile image89
      Neil Sperlingposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      It depends on the person - there are four types of people. Two of the four types make decisions based on logic, while the other two types make decisions based on emotions. Check this point out here!

      http://community.adlandpro.com/forums/t … 69014.aspx

      1. marinealways24 profile image61
        marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Excellent Informative post, Thank You. I believe it would be a nice goal to acheive the positives in all 4 types, however I believe somone must also view the negative to truly appreciate the positive.

    6. profile image0
      dennisemattposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      DUDE!!! read the athiest thread..youll get your answer.  lol

      for me personally, I try real hard to be logical, but it rarely works out.

      1. profile image0
        Leta Sposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        lolololololololo  wink

  2. jenblacksheep profile image85
    jenblacksheepposted 7 years ago

    I think logic prevails when/if it realises a stronger emotion.

    For example: you get really mad at someone and you want to lash out at them, but you don't because you know there would be bad consequences for you i.e. they might hit you back!

    1. marinealways24 profile image61
      marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      If you hit them, would this not be giving into emotion rather than using logic? Possibly if they left you no choice but to hit them back, maybe this would be where emotion would "need" to rule logic?

      1. kmackey32 profile image80
        kmackey32posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I would hit them. lol

  3. Dame Scribe profile image61
    Dame Scribeposted 7 years ago

    Logic is cold and calculating like a automaton whereas emotion is fire and chaotic and unpredictable making us all different and individual tongue if that makes any sense lol lol

    1. marinealways24 profile image61
      marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I would have to disagree in saying every individual has a different individual idea of logic and emotion.

  4. marinealways24 profile image61
    marinealways24posted 7 years ago

    Whoops, I added more.

  5. marinealways24 profile image61
    marinealways24posted 7 years ago

    I believe a short definition for logic would be the "individuals" idea of "right" and "wrong" correct?

    Majority logic - Grouped Individual Idea of right and wrong?

  6. marinealways24 profile image61
    marinealways24posted 7 years ago

    One more example, If a soldier in war and saw his best friend get killed, if the soldier were to break down and start crying from emotions, the soilder would possibly get killed along with his friend. The soldier would be expected to act on instinct, training and logic to survive or kill the enemy. Military training does not train weak emotions.

  7. Lisa HW profile image83
    Lisa HWposted 7 years ago

    I think it depends on the person in question.  Some people are more skilled than others at separating themselves from emotions and using logic to make decisions (or form opinions/conclusions).  People who are "very prone to logic" don't let emotions hang around longer than is necessary without processing them "intellectually".  Because they operate mainly on logic they aren't as prone to emotional ups and downs either.  On the other hand, there are people who can't separate themselves from their emotions at all.

    1. marinealways24 profile image61
      marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Of the ones that can't seperate their emotions, I would think they are controlled by mind rather than in control of the mind.

  8. Lisa HW profile image83
    Lisa HWposted 7 years ago

    I think part of it (for those who can't separate emotions) is not understanding other people well enough and misinterpreting their motives.

    Another problem can be that some people have a stress response that launches them into emotions more easily than others are.

    I think, too, a lot of people don't understand themselves well enough.  They "get their buttons pushed" easily, don't know why it happens, and are then thrown into an emotional response (which includes changes in brain chemicals).  Once brain chemicals have been "knocked out of whack" it's more difficult to step back from emotions.

    1. marinealways24 profile image61
      marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Agreed. I have had temper and anxiety problems before. One think I notice about my thinking when I am mad or anxious is that my thinking speeds up without warning. I have also noticed that my emotions will keep me on a fixed thought when not challenged.

  9. profile image0
    Leta Sposted 7 years ago

    Both logic and emotion play a part in our understanding of anything.  I wouldn't want to totally separate the two, as to do so would also create, perhaps, lack of empathy, which is necessary in understanding, caring for, and in any way dealing with other people.

    Our society, based on 'macho individualism,' partially, as an ideal, likes to think we should/can separate the two.  You see this when people stereotype men as being more 'ligical,'lol, and women as being more emotional.  The truth is a little more complex.

    Emotional intelligence has received a lot of attention recently.  Daniel Goleman's book "Emotional Intelligence" is a good place to start.

    1. profile image0
      sandra rinckposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Exactly, without logic you wouldn't understand the emotion.

      1. Davinagirl3 profile image60
        Davinagirl3posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Very delicately stated... and dead on!

    2. marinealways24 profile image61
      marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Lita, I am too "ligic" to quit. lol Please explain "macho individualism", would this be one whom thinks with ego that all of their logical ideas are right without debate? What exactly is emotional intelligence?

    3. Jewels profile image81
      Jewelsposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Is a difference between emotion and feeling?  Empathy and compassion are put in the realm of feeling and not emotion.  Emotion is a more reactive response - e=mc2. Energy in motion.  Cause and effect create emotion - fight and flight.  Compassion and empathy are a state of being.  Choice is required in order to have compassion and empathy. 

      Emotion can be a split second reaction to an event. Over time the response is learned behavior.  If a child is traumatized by say emotional trauma - say mum and dad argue loudly allot.  The child feel insecure. Response is reactive. The child may cry, or stop crying if the father yells at the child to stop.  Reactive response learned (possibly) is to freeze in fear when people argue.  This is reactive emotion. 

      Interestingly people say 'follow your heart.'  This can be a danger zone if trauma has caused a lack of trust in the feelings one has.  If ill-feelings are the cause of trauma, decisions are based on preservation and not logic.  Only until you understand your reason for response and can not react, can use logic reasoning. 

      Soldiers are a classic example of being taught how not to have emotion.  In times of crisis, if emotion rules their decisions, wrong decisions can be made.

      1. marinealways24 profile image61
        marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Nice examples, thanks for adding.

  10. Lisa HW profile image83
    Lisa HWposted 7 years ago

    When I mention separating I'm not saying emotions are absent.  There's immediate emotions (as, for example, someone's mother just died).  There's no separating that, and that's why people are told to wait a while after a death before making life-changing decisions.

    Maybe it would be better to specify "converting" emotions before factoring them into logical thinking.  Converting them can happen fairly soon after they occur most times (because something like loss of a family member, fortunately, doesn't come that often in life).  If a bully bothers my five-year-old (which I don't have in reality) I'm going to have that immediate emotional response of having someone bother my child.  If I wait just a little while, the emotional "flare up" will die down, and I may be left calm but disliking the bully.  That's when I'd have use my logical thinking to recognize why I didn't like the kid but that he, himself, is also only five years old (and his parents are likely jerks).  Once that processing has taken place, that's when I'd be able to step back from my own emotions and make a more reasonable decision about how to handle the situation.

    I guess "separating" isn't about just ignoring emotions.  Instead, there's the first separating the physiological response from emotions left behind, and then "separating out" logical thinking enough to take the first step in processing the left-over emotions (by identifying, labeling, and putting in "mental file folders"), and then making decisions from a "more mentally organized" state.

  11. choiceessentials profile image59
    choiceessentialsposted 7 years ago

    Really depends on the situation.

    If dealing with a relationship.. most of the time.. it's emotion over logic.

    However, if at work.. likely to be logic over emotions.

  12. profile image0
    \Brenda Scullyposted 7 years ago

    emotions can take over, but logic is always looming in the background..... sometimes ignoring logic is o.k. for the moment, but eventually in wins out in the end...

    1. marinealways24 profile image61
      marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Agreed

  13. marinealways24 profile image61
    marinealways24posted 7 years ago

    Lisa,

    "If a bully bothers my five-year-old (which I don't have in reality) I'm going to have that immediate emotional response of having someone bother my child.  If I wait just a little while, the emotional "flare up" will die down, and I may be left calm but disliking the bully.  That's when I'd have use my logical thinking to recognize why I didn't like the kid but that he, himself, is also only five years old (and his parents are likely jerks).  Once that processing has taken place, that's when I'd be able to step back from my own emotions and make a more reasonable decision about how to handle the situation."

    Excellent Example

    1. Davinagirl3 profile image60
      Davinagirl3posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      OBJECTIVITY!!!  It is always the safest bet.
      If someone slaps me in the face and I punch them back... I am playing their game. 
      If someone slaps me in the face and I laugh at them... They're playing mine.
      In my eyes, violence, in a sense, is a form of weakness.  My mom use to say, "if you hit that person, you just lost the argument."

      1. marinealways24 profile image61
        marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I would like to add something on that. In the marines, I had a guy ranked higher than me. He assumed I was a chump and that I would let someone run me over. He assumed wrong. We were sitting in a hallway one morning and I over heard him talking to his friend. He was speaking of working one morning when he had an altercation with another person. I was sitting down reading a magazine. I gave a brief "ha". He stood above me, asked me what I was laughing at, put his hand on my cheek and pushed my face to the side. I immediately stood up. I did not instantly hit him. I kindly told him to not put his hands on me and if he chose to again, it would be more honerable to do it while I was standing up. He bellied up and gave me a push to the chest. I popped him dead in the face with a left/right. Shortly later, the fight was broken up. I will say, when put in a corner, if you do not stand, you will not progress. I will honestly say that me an him had an excellent understanding after the incident. He stopped judging me and we became excellent friends and grew from one another.

        1. Davinagirl3 profile image60
          Davinagirl3posted 7 years ago in reply to this

          I think this sums up your initial question beautifully.  We are logical beings, but we are also emotional animals.  Logically, you knew that if you did not stand for yourself, you would be a "chump".  But when push came to shove, you had to exercise your logic in an emotional way.  I would have done the same thing... Women, believe it or not, are sometimes put in similar situations. wink

          1. marinealways24 profile image61
            marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

            On the women being in same situations, I was a bouncer for 5 years. I know all about you women! lol Well, I think I know but man will never know because women will never know! Don't hit me

  14. Pete Maida profile image59
    Pete Maidaposted 7 years ago

    It is the combination that makes humans successful.  Knowing when to choose one over the other is the tough part.  There are times, like in battle, that it is important to keep your wits about you.  There are other times when logically you know that you are in a position to make a big gain, but you defer to someone else because you know they need it more than you do.  You may lose the gain but your emotional heart may be the better for it.

  15. marinealways24 profile image61
    marinealways24posted 7 years ago

    Thank You for adding Pete.

  16. profile image0
    pgrundyposted 7 years ago

    A good book just came out on this very topic. It's written by a psychologist who did studies on how people make decisions. The research uncovered lots of surprising insights. It turns out that many 'logical' decisions are based more heavily on underlying emotion that previously thought.

    One really cool part involved a group of patients who had had brain damage such that they could not factor emotions into their decisions. They were literally 'Mr. Spock' in the way their minds worked. What was fascinating was that they would take all day to make decisions such as whether to wear a red or a brown shirt. They were almost incapable of deciding anything in a timely fashion and the impairment had a very negative impact on the lives.

    Often, emotion gives us nonverbal information about the world around us that is just beneath the threshold of consciousness. Without that information we can't function.

    Somehow I think this is more than you wanted in an answer.

    God, I'm a idiot.

    1. Davinagirl3 profile image60
      Davinagirl3posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      This reminded me of the guy who detached his frontal lobe with a railroad spike Phineaus, or Phillious, something or other.  He couldn't use logic, nor could he filter what came out of his mouth.  He was an engineer who became a man who wandered the streets yelling and spewing obsenities.  The story is very sad.

    2. marinealways24 profile image61
      marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      What was fascinating was that they would take all day to make decisions such as whether to wear a red or a brown shirt. They were almost incapable of deciding anything in a timely fashion and the impairment had a very negative impact on the lives.

      I believe I have some common ground. Sometimes in simple math or simple decisions, it will take me a frustrating amount of time to decide the answer. I believe I often over analyze when I do not make the effort to slow down. No perspective can ever be considered "too much", Thank You. What is the book you are speaking of? Sounds fun

  17. profile image0
    pgrundyposted 7 years ago

    I knew someone would ask that! lol!

    Maybe Lita will know. I just checked it out of the library last week but I already returned the thing.

    Here's one I found on Amazon that might be the same one (or not). It sounds like it has lots of the same research in it:

    http://www.amazon.com/Sources-Power-Peo … 0262611465


    That's interesting, the math example you give. I get into a similar state in video stores or big box stores. If I don't get what I need within about the first five minutes, it's like I go into this feedback loop where I can't decide anything. I go into what I call 'shopper shock.' I hate places like that for that very reason.

    1. marinealways24 profile image61
      marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Amazingly, I have had these same experiences you mention in the shopping example. I have recently realized that my mind runs circles in ridiculous speeds when I over analyze things, Possibly it is just a case of slowing down thought?

      1. Jewels profile image81
        Jewelsposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Procrastination can occur like that.

        1. marinealways24 profile image61
          marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

          By slowing thought or over analyzing?

          1. Jewels profile image81
            Jewelsposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Over-analysis mainly.  Shopping centres however, are terrible for chaos.  If you are 'sensitive' it's not hard to get caught in the crossfire of everyones thought forms.  That may not make sense.  But interesting if you think of thoughts as a superhighway, this is not hard to fathom.  Slowing down of thoughts may create a steadiness, stillness if you like.

            1. marinealways24 profile image61
              marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

              I see what you are saying. I noticed one other thing is that my temper will and would be irrational at times. Like in the shopping example, my mind speeds up and runs in circles. I notice when I slow down, my temper slows down and I can return to logic.

  18. jenblacksheep profile image85
    jenblacksheepposted 7 years ago

    I think some people are confusing emotion and instinct. You can use logic and emotion together ... both will effect all decisions, but logic and instinct are generally opposites.

  19. profile image0
    Useful Knowledgeposted 7 years ago

    My emotions almost always prevail over logic. I tend to get so wrapped up in my emotions that I forget about logic.

    Let's say I want to buy a new car. Logically, I know that I can't really afford it at that moment. On the other hand, my emotions of wanting thew car so badly overtake my inner being and I just can't stop thinking about how good I would look driving my new (short lived) piece of happiness. As a result, I throw all logic out the window and fly by the seat of my pants with my emotions. Then, a year down the road, I am stuck with a car payment that I can't afford, the (short lived happiness) is long gone, and I am thinking with my logic at this point.

    I tend to be this way about every choice I make. You would think one would learn, but, I never do. What can I say, my emotions always overpower the will of my logical intellect.

    1. marinealways24 profile image61
      marinealways24posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Maybe our emotions were designed to take our minds off of the stressful logical decisions we must make in life?

  20. Ms Chievous profile image80
    Ms Chievousposted 7 years ago

    As stated in a post before it depends upon the person or the population.  I have worked with various types of people thorughout my life.  I spent ten years working with teenagers, especially teenage girls.. As you would guess their world is ruled by emotion.

    In my experience in working with mentally ill people. Emotions rule over 80% of the people I see.  Logic takes a back door and I end up seeing them after they have either tried, suicide, overdose or just plain quit taking their medications. On the flip side, If I meet a mentally ill person who is just extremely logical.. it scares the heck out of me.

 
working