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liabilities

  1. sylph profile image60
    sylphposted 7 years ago

    are we allowed to post dragged images from the net?

    1. Marisa Wright profile image92
      Marisa Wrightposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Only if they are from sites which allow photos to be copied.  You can't just pick any old photo from Google Images etc.

  2. LVM profile image54
    LVMposted 7 years ago

    they say it must be public domain images.

    some people take the pictures from the net and edit them first before re-publishing them.

    1. Marisa Wright profile image92
      Marisa Wrightposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      They don't have to be public domain images.  They can be images that are licensed under Creative Commons.  There are a couple of different kinds of CC licences - you want the one that allows commercial use.

      You can't just take a photo, edit it and call it your own.  That's still breaching copyright.  Once again, there is a Creative Commons license that allows you to edit or alter photos. 

      For Creative Commons, you have to thank the original photographer in your Hub and include a link to his/her website (e.g. Flickr). 

      There are also a few photo sites which specialise in free photos, they all have their own terms and conditions.  Watch out for a couple of things:

      - a "royalty-free" photo isn't free, you have to buy it first then you can use it as often as you like without paying royalties.

      - don't use Photobucket.  Most of the photos on Photobucket have been copied illegally by Photobucket members.

  3. sunforged profile image66
    sunforgedposted 7 years ago

    fun fact:

    Works prepared by federal government officers and employees as part of their official duties are not protected by copyright. Consequently, federal statutes (the Copyright Act, for example) and regulations are not protected by copyright

    anyways as far as "editing" goes... (this is US law, but I believe Hubs operates as  a US company so its user partners would be beholden to it


    Copyright protection arises automatically when an original work of authorship is fixed in a tangible medium of expression. Registration with the Copyright Office is optional (but you have to register before you file an infringement suit).

    The use of copyright notice is optional for works distributed after March 1, 1989. Copyright notice can take any of these three forms:

       1. © followed by a date and name.
       2. "Copyright" followed by a date and name.
       3. "Copr." followed by a date and name.

    The Exclusive Rights
    A copyright owner has five exclusive rights in the copyrighted work:

       1.
       2. Reproduction Right. The reproduction right is the right to copy, duplicate, transcribe, or imitate the work in fixed form.

       3. Modification Right. The modification right (also known as the derivative works right) is the right to modify the work to create a new work. A new work that is based on a preexisting work is known as a "derivative work."

       4. Distribution Right. The distribution right is the right to distribute copies of the work to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending.

       5. Public Performance Right. The public performance right is the right to recite, play, dance, act, or show the work at public place or to transmit it to the public. In the case of a motion picture or other audiovisual work, showing the work's images in sequence is considered "performance."

       6. Public Display Right. The public display right is the right to show a copy of the work directly or by means of a film, slide, or television image at a public place or to transmit it to the public. In the case of a motion picture or other audiovisual work, showing the work's images out of sequence is considered "display."

    Infringement
    Anyone who violates any of the exclusive rights of a copyright owner is an infringer.
    Example: Developer scanned Photographer's copyrighted photograph, altered the image by using digital editing software, and included the altered version of the photograph in a multimedia work that Developer sold to consumers. If Developer used Photographer's photograph without permission, Developer infringed Photographer's copyright by violating the reproduction right (scanning the photograph), the modification right (altering the photograph), and the distribution right (selling the altered photograph as part of the multimedia work).

    A copyright owner can recover actual or, in some cases, statutory damages from an infringer. The federal district courts have the power to issue injunctions (orders) to prevent or restrain copyright infringement and to order the impoundment and destruction of infringing copies.

 
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