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What is the original source of this saying?

  1. Aya Katz profile image89
    Aya Katzposted 7 years ago

    I watched BLEACH last night and was struck by the depth of this observation that one of the characters made: "Admiration is the furthest removed state from understanding."

    Is this an original thought? If I want to cite it properly, should I credit BLEACH? Or is this a common saying among the Japanese? What is the oldest known source?

  2. archdaw profile image61
    archdawposted 7 years ago

    That was deep.  I get back to you on that one.

  3. Aya Katz profile image89
    Aya Katzposted 7 years ago

    Thanks, Archdaw!

  4. Shadesbreath profile image89
    Shadesbreathposted 7 years ago

    I am not familiar with what "Bleach" is, but if a character or person said it on the show and did not attribute it to anyone else, it is reasonable for you to credit the source from which you received the information.  You are actually quoting the source from which YOU received the information which is verifiable.

    1. archdaw profile image61
      archdawposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      "Bleach" is an animae Japaneese series.  I am sorry Aya, not even 542542 could help me (LOL).

  5. Aya Katz profile image89
    Aya Katzposted 7 years ago

    Thanks, Archdaw.

    Shadesbreath, yes, of course I can credit BLEACH if I write a hub about it. But if I write historical fiction set in a period before anime, I can't do that. So I was wondering if there was an earlier source.

  6. Shadesbreath profile image89
    Shadesbreathposted 7 years ago

    Well, sounds like you have a research project then.  However, as an option, if it's fiction, you can do what fantasy writers often do (and advertising people lol) with old proverbs and the like and just capture the essence of it in your own words, which can actually serve character development well anyway, adding to their voice.

  7. Aya Katz profile image89
    Aya Katzposted 7 years ago

    Shadesbreath, yeah, I was thinking of doing something like what you suggested. If I don't find an ancient source, I could just have a Japanese character say: "There is an old proverb among my people..." This would be a signal to the reader that I'm not claiming authorship over the saying.

  8. wrenfrost56 profile image81
    wrenfrost56posted 7 years ago

    I am not familiar with that quote, but it is a good one! I will remember and contemplate, I like it, thank's for shareing.

  9. Shalini Kagal profile image81
    Shalini Kagalposted 7 years ago

    Freud, perhaps?

  10. Aya Katz profile image89
    Aya Katzposted 7 years ago

    Shalini, really? Freud? Do you have a particular work by Freud in mind?

  11. profile image0
    Pacal Votanposted 7 years ago

    Sosuke Aizen in Bleach.

    You could answer someone with this quip when he or she states they admire you for some reason and you wanted to be modest and witty at the same time. However, that's about it. When taken for something profound it reflects a pessimistic world-view and is honestly quite shallow. IMO

    1. Aya Katz profile image89
      Aya Katzposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Yes. It was Sosuke Aizen in BLEACH. I was just wondering if that was the first time the observation has ever been made.

      It strikes me as quite deep, because it explains why so often people don't like to spend time with their admirers!

      1. profile image0
        Pacal Votanposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Yes, I think from that stand point it is true that admiration and understanding are sometimes far apart. The saying strikes me as a huge generalization though. It's almost never wise to cite generalizations, but it's up to you. smile

  12. Shalini Kagal profile image81
    Shalini Kagalposted 7 years ago

    Not sure Aya - wish I could be - just some vague recollection of something I've read - and I could be remembering wrong!!

  13. Dale Nelson profile image32
    Dale Nelsonposted 7 years ago

    my guess is that Mao or a chinese or japanese 12th to 14 th century philosopher coined the phrase.I would change furthest to furtherest in my search though. Could be greek and translated.

    Just a guess not a given

 
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