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Hubbers, A Little Assistance Please

  1. readytoescape profile image59
    readytoescapeposted 7 years ago

    I am compiling questions pertaining to household Electrical, Heating and Air conditioning, remolding, repair and other subjects for a Homeowners’ How To Ebook I am completing and I have run out of questions to ask myself.

    The Ebook is tentatively titled “The Gentleman’s Guide to the Honey Do List”

    Do you have any questions you would like to suggest or are having related issues you would like help with? I will post the answers then expand them and use them in the book.

    I plan to research several different sources on the net for more questions but I thought I would ask you all first.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I love your proposed title! It put a smile on my face right away. When I had a honey to do, the things on my list were not so much about fixing electrical and HVAC or even remodeling, they were more about taking out the trash, washing the windows and dishes, scrubbing the tub, and picking the kid up from after-school activities. So, I don't think I have any ideas to offer about your request, except that maybe you could put a second book in the works about how the gentleman could be helping out more around the house.  Good luck with your project!

  2. profile image0
    lynnechandlerposted 7 years ago

    Oh I like this topic but I could see expanding on it to maybe a general guide for the single female on how to do basic repairs around the house.

    1. readytoescape profile image59
      readytoescapeposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I do have a subtitle

      "Or Help for those that are Honeyless"

      Although I'm willing to consider Title suggestions

      the book itself is gender nuetral except for a few jokes here and there.

    2. profile image0
      Justine76posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      i like this. honey do...its good, but lots of us women (single or not) have to do it all
      how to: change the oil? Clean the chimney? Check tires air pressure? unclog a drain? hang vinyl siding? wire an outside light? replace a toilet? get a guy to pump you gas for you, at a self service station? smile

      1. Hokey profile image60
        Hokeyposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Easy!  Call me!!!   big_smile

        1. profile image0
          Justine76posted 7 years ago in reply to this

          wink im just giving question suggestions

      2. readytoescape profile image59
        readytoescapeposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        That one might have to be aq second book,

        perhaps "The Ladies Guide to not Needing a Man"

  3. profile image0
    lynnechandlerposted 7 years ago

    You are so right Justine. How about a standard list of handy tools to have on hand? What a toilet snake is and how to use it? How to patch drywall? Appropriate tools for painting, wallpapering, etc.

    1. profile image0
      Justine76posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      what is mud? whats up woth metric drill bits? whats an allen wrench? should I use blue board or fiberglass insulation ? how do I deal with creeps at the dump?.....maybe I should write the womans book..kidding

      1. readytoescape profile image59
        readytoescapeposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I'll provide details and assitance for 1/2 the rights>

        1. profile image0
          Justine76posted 7 years ago in reply to this

          lol i am full of ideas but will never sit down and write a  book. good idea you have, and good luck to you!!!

          1. readytoescape profile image59
            readytoescapeposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Thank you, and to answer your question about creeps at the dump, GO ARMED.

            1. profile image0
              Justine76posted 7 years ago in reply to this

              lol  lol  I go in shorts and high heels. I usally dont have to haul the can out of the van...

              1. readytoescape profile image59
                readytoescapeposted 7 years ago in reply to this

                Good plan, wear a short skirt and get a thigh holster

                1. profile image0
                  Justine76posted 7 years ago in reply to this

                  thats hot...

  4. readytoescape profile image59
    readytoescapeposted 7 years ago

    See this is working already have a few things to add,

    I Like it.

    It appears there is also a suggestion for a third Book
    "Guys, so you thought you wouldn't have to do this stuff when you got Married"

    1. profile image0
      Justine76posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      no...ladies, ditch the list, you can do it!   smile

  5. profile image0
    lynnechandlerposted 7 years ago

    I think you have a grand idea here. Let us know how it turns out.

    Off the top of my head, things like not using a broom handle to fix the garbage disposal, um how to catch squirrels in your attic, how to fix an ignitor on the gas fireplace so the pilot light will stay on etc.

  6. Wayne Orvisburg profile image78
    Wayne Orvisburgposted 7 years ago

    How to patch a small waterdamaged piece of sheet rock in the ceiling?

    1. profile image0
      lynnechandlerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Has the leak in the roof been repaired? If not you need to start there, lol

      If so and it is just a stain, you can fix that up real easy.

      1. Wayne Orvisburg profile image78
        Wayne Orvisburgposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Yes, I got a whole new roof. The stain isn't my concern. There's a couple inch spot that is kind of crumbling. I think I know how to fix it, but was trying to offer a good section for the book. I have a whole book on drywall, but doesn't cover this kind of small patch in a ceiling.

        1. profile image0
          lynnechandlerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          I know Wayne, and sorry to hear you had to have a whole new roof. You are right not a lot out there in the books on small patch jobs for the ceiling. I know they don't tell you to make sure to change the insulation in that area too.

  7. profile image0
    lynnechandlerposted 7 years ago

    And there is another ebook in and of itself>>>Basic weapons training for the little woman.

    1. readytoescape profile image59
      readytoescapeposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Already wrote that hub, "Gun Carrying For women"

  8. Lily Rose profile image83
    Lily Roseposted 7 years ago

    I love your title!  Unfortunately I am more handy than my husband (although he'll never admit it!)  Suggestions I would have would be:

    When to use what - such as what type of screw to use for specific materials (drywall, concrete, wood, ect) or when to use and anchor and when not to

    How to properly hang a shelf so it doesn't fall off the wall

    How to baby-proof (attaching large furniture to the wall, etc)

    How to fix/replace a toilet handle/flapper

    How to change an outdoor light on your house

    How to make things portable (like an ottoman or small table) by attaching casters

    How to build a rolling storage box for under the bed

    How to hang closet shelving

    Okay, that's all I can think of right now.

  9. readytoescape profile image59
    readytoescapeposted 7 years ago

    This is cool, keep it going. I have to go to the bank,
    I'm running out of writing fuel, Scotch.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image98
      Sally's Troveposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Ah! Writing fuel. Nothing else like it. Cheers to you, and to me.

  10. readytoescape profile image59
    readytoescapeposted 7 years ago

    Sorry Folks, got tied up and couldn’t get back.

    There was a bar very close to the bank.

    Example: Wayne’s DRY WALL PATCH

    You will need

    Materials
    1 small strip of wood, roughly 12” x 1” x ½”  (length should be 4” longer than patch)
    a scrap piece of drywall,
    four 1 ¼” drywall screws,
    joint compound
    spray on ceiling texture

    Tools

    Drywall Saw / Razor Knife
    Phillips Screw Driver
    Putty Knife

    Cut piece of drywall to a size about inch larger than the damaged area, when cutting do so on a 45 degree angle slanting inward from the finish side, this will be your patch. At the location of the damage open a small hole using the drywall saw like a drill bit, twisting the blade. Once you have the hole insert the blade or screwdriver and move it around at an angle and in a circular motion, try to feel if you are near a framing member. If not, place the patch over the area to be repaired with the finished side towards you and trace the around the patch at the point of the unfinished side (inner point of the angled cut).

    Then cut the hole out around the damaged area and remove. While you are cutting, use the same angle as with your patch, almost as if cutting a “lid” for a Jack-o-Lantern. The blade should be angled in towards the center of the damaged area. This is called a watermelon cut and you will be installing and “watermelon patch.”

    Once the damaged area is removed the patch should fit without pushing through the hole, the angles should meet and prevent the patch from going all the way through.

    Now position the piece of wood on the backside of the hole so that it is centered and there is roughly 2 inches of wood on either side of the hole. Insert through the hole at an angle and slide until positioned. If the hole is square or round direction does not matter. If the hole is rectangular center parallel with the longer leg, for patches over 1 square foot use two pieces of wood perpendicular to the long leg. Once the wood is in place install one drywall screw through the good dry wall 1inch or so outside the hole on either side. Hold the piece of wood with one hand applying downward pressure and screw with the other. Starting the screws part way into to the drywall will be helpful. You can also place the wood strips on the long edges of the hole. At the edge of the hole on either side mark where the piece of wood is located.

    Place a small amount of drywall compound to the edges of the patch, just as if your where going to glue the edges together. Set the patch in place and fasten with drywall screws to the wood. You now should have a solid repair that needs only finishing.

 
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