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"Politically Correct?"..Why? Why Not "Candidly Honest?"

  1. qwark profile image61
    qwarkposted 7 years ago

    Why are we "Americans" so damned sensitive about the way something is verbally expressed?
    Why not tell it like it is!?

    1. Phoenix Poet profile image61
      Phoenix Poetposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I am all for telling it like it is!
      Being PC is generally a bunch of bullsh*t.
      Then again, here at HP, if being PC keeps the dollars coming in then you better believe the powers-that-be will see that you remain PC-LOL!

    2. calpol25 profile image78
      calpol25posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Its the same here in britain qwark. We have to watch everything we say and do, I dont care to be honest I always speak my mind but in the society here we still have to retain tact and diplomacy lol smile
      Freedom of speech is our human right but its still denied in some cases.

    3. Ben Evans profile image74
      Ben Evansposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I also believe that people should be able to express themselves without worrying about whether what has been said is politically correct.  I think that sensitivity has gone to far for instance........

      We do not have garbagemen they are they are sanitation engineers.  (pc)

      "In Seattle they get paid as much and sometimes more than mechanical and electrical engineers." (not pc)

      What I said in the quotaions is considered politically incorrect as well as insensitve.  A person who has an opinion, however, cannot express it if they keep themselves pc in a situation like this.

      When a person is purposely hurtful with their language it should not be morally all right.  I also dont think it is all right to use derogatory langauge that will catagorize a person by race, gender, sect., ect.  This is not expressing our opinion but purposely trying to hurt some one or stratify ourselves.

      There are also gray areas like some gender discussions, weight, age, ect. We must consider our audience when we speak.

      I do agree, though, that we need to be able to better express ourselves.   

      .................but not in a blatently offensive and hurtful manner.

  2. Ohma profile image80
    Ohmaposted 7 years ago

    I am an American and I would rather someone just say what they think. I do not have to agree with it or even like it but I do respect the honesty.

    1. qwark profile image61
      qwarkposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Ohma:
      I'm with you!
      But it seems as each day goes by, we Americans are becoming more and more sensitive to the way others speak of many aspects of life...I hate it! ...:-)

  3. Buck Steiner profile image61
    Buck Steinerposted 7 years ago

    Ive been working on my political correctness, so far I ain't doing too well!

    1. profile image0
      kimberlyslyricsposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      lol lol lol

  4. Ohma profile image80
    Ohmaposted 7 years ago

    Political correctness is over rated at least when people are honest there is very little confusion about where they stand on any given topic.

    1. qwark profile image61
      qwarkposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Ohma: I agree.

  5. DevLin profile image60
    DevLinposted 7 years ago

    I'm getting closer.

  6. tony0724 profile image61
    tony0724posted 7 years ago

    PC is for people who don't have the nad to express the truth. I have failed miserably at PC. And I think people are gettin a little thin skinned these days

  7. Shadesbreath profile image91
    Shadesbreathposted 7 years ago

    PC started out as a good idea for a particular moment in time, to encourage awareness that words can do harm.  It became a blunt object that social crusaders wield to drive honesty into hiding, under some delusion that if you don't hear racism or sexism it magically vanishes.  I prefer knowing where potential problems are, frankly.

    Wouldn't you rather know there is a snake in the room because you see it sliding across the floor than discovering it as its fangs sink into the soft flesh where your achilles tendon is?

    1. qwark profile image61
      qwarkposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Shades:
      Yep!

    2. qwark profile image61
      qwarkposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Shades:
      Yep!

    3. EmpressFelicity profile image86
      EmpressFelicityposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I've often felt that PC is practised by guilty people trying to guilt trip others into feeling as guilty as they are lol lol

      1. Shadesbreath profile image91
        Shadesbreathposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I know a few who would fall under this category.

        Although, I would say that anyone who tells you they have no prejudices at all, against anyone, no matter what category, classification or stratification, is either lying or doesn't know what prejudice means.

        Sometimes we discover one in ourselves we didn't know we had, and feel guilty for it. I think the real trick is to be aware of this human instinct to categorize and be open to recognizing it in ourselves and fixing it.  Be open to recognizing it in others and helping them to see that we aren't what they fear us to be.

        1. Misha profile image75
          Mishaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Why should we fix what is not broken? Prejudice is a survival skill. smile

          We just need to understand its place - as a quick and dirty rule of thumb that helps us to forecast what to expect from a stranger. smile

          1. Buck Steiner profile image61
            Buck Steinerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Very true!

          2. livelonger profile image89
            livelongerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Does that apply to those stereotypes that apply to Russians? smile

            1. Misha profile image75
              Mishaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

              Oh absolutely. I guarantee you can make a small fortune betting on Russian strangers being able to drink more alcohol than American strangers. Does not mean every Russian drinks more than every American though smile

              1. livelonger profile image89
                livelongerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

                That's by far the most innocuous stereotype about Russians.

                I, for the record, think the vast majority of stereotypes are bunk, and that you should evaluate each person on his/her own actions.

                1. profile image0
                  LegendaryHeroposted 7 years ago in reply to this

                  Yeah, most stereotypes are false. Evaluating a person on their actions is the best way to go about it.

                  Also: The highest beer drinking is surprisingly Luxembourg. Russia isn't even on the list.

                  http://img512.imageshack.us/img512/9836/87838alcoholbycountryda1.jpg

                2. BDazzler profile image82
                  BDazzlerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

                  So stereotypically, stereotypes are wrong?  I would also presume that generally speaking you reject generalizations? wink

          3. Shadesbreath profile image91
            Shadesbreathposted 7 years ago in reply to this



            I agree, as long people remember to put as much effort into remembering the "it's quick and dirty" as they do accepting it as a "survival skill" AKA "natural."

            1. Misha profile image75
              Mishaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

              Yep, that's the part we tend to forget unfortunately...

        2. EmpressFelicity profile image86
          EmpressFelicityposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Absolutely right.  Where the PC brigade go wrong is that they fail to stop at examining their own behaviour and go off on a moral crusade which often ends up stifling any attempt at honest debate or sensible decision making.


  8. Rochelle Frank profile image89
    Rochelle Frankposted 7 years ago

    I agree with Shades. We have gone far away from what was first considered to be "politically correct"-- an effort to avoid being offensively rude.
    Tactfulness can be helpful, but people can be offended with the truth, even in the most polite terms.

    Having worked in elementary  school classrooms for many years, I have  personally limited my vocabulary to words that are PG acceptable, but I am not offended (In fact I would be grateful) if someone  yelled at me, "Don't step on that F***IN
    RATTLESNAKE!"

    1. Randy Godwin profile image92
      Randy Godwinposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Thank you Rochelle......I think!

      1. wyanjen profile image89
        wyanjenposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        hee hee hee

    2. qwark profile image61
      qwarkposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Hahaha...Rochelle!
      I'm with you!
      Too many times I've been told I'm much to "candid." My response is TOUGH! If it's too hot in the kitchen ..."F***KIN" LEAVE!  :-)

      1. livelonger profile image89
        livelongerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Have people been too candid - in a different way, naturally - for your taste?

        1. qwark profile image61
          qwarkposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          We're, to my way of thinking, cowtowing to the religious.
          Screw the sensitivity of those who believe in mythical gods and have a disgusting history of death and destruction! Lets get real! Accept reality as it is! Speak of it as it really exists!
          Words are just that... words! They cannot hurt unless one allows them to!
          Toughen up! Tell it like it is!

          1. Randy Godwin profile image92
            Randy Godwinposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            I agree!

            1. qwark profile image61
              qwarkposted 7 years ago in reply to this

              Ty Randy!

          2. Sab Oh profile image61
            Sab Ohposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Yeah! We should be free to tell the self-obsessed, atheist simpletons what ego-maniacal blockheads with a history of death and destruction  they are without worrying about their feelings even though it threatens to puncture the surface and demonstrate that there is nothing within.

            You tell 'em!

  9. livelonger profile image89
    livelongerposted 7 years ago

    Politically correct is an accurate term. It's what politicians have to say in order to get elected.

    For instance, it is politically correct to say you're a God-fearing Christian and you're against gay marriage, no matter what your true feelings are on the matter.

    Not what some would consider political correctness, but they're misunderstanding the term.

  10. princess g profile image60
    princess gposted 7 years ago

    I always tell it like it is, and I'm an American. But you're right. I can't stand "politically correct" obsessiveness. It's retarded.

    (See? I said "retarded", and that is totally unpolitically correct!)

    1. Buck Steiner profile image61
      Buck Steinerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Unless Barack Obama say's it, then its totally ignored!

    2. Sab Oh profile image61
      Sab Ohposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Do you use words like "black," "hispanic," "female," or "gay" as all-purpose adjectives for something negative?

      1. Phoenix Poet profile image61
        Phoenix Poetposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Good question.
        Even though it wasn't to ME I would like to respond.
        I generally do not use words associated with race as all-purpose adjectives for something negative BUT I have been known to use "female" and "gay" in that way.
        Women use the word "male" the same way at times and I once wrote an entire piece on how I feel about the word "gay".  I really do NOT care that kids use it as a negative word now.  The homosexual community took the word from the heterosexual community and now--generations later--the straight community is taking it back through their children. . . albeit with yet another definition.
        Who cares really?  We empower words.  They have no power on their own.  We give it to them.

        1. Sab Oh profile image61
          Sab Ohposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          "I generally do not use words associated with race as all-purpose adjectives for something negative BUT I have been known to use "female" and "gay" in that way."


          Ok, so you feel that being female or gay is a negative condition, right?

          1. Phoenix Poet profile image61
            Phoenix Poetposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            To answer your question directly: No
            To expound on that answer:
            We ALL make fun of the opposite gender and I don't care about the whole "gay" issue because of reasons stated earlier.
            if one group can change a word then so can another.

            1. Sab Oh profile image61
              Sab Ohposted 7 years ago in reply to this

              You answered "No" but the rest of your response indicated "yes."

              1. Phoenix Poet profile image61
                Phoenix Poetposted 7 years ago in reply to this

                You pretty much asked a "yes" or "no" question.  Between those two I chose "no".
                The rest was just additional, generalized information not necessarily meant to apply to me specifically.
                I don't consider guys complaining about or joking about girls and vice-versa as something that is meant to be an actual insult.  I would say it's more of a "tease".
                I will not comment on the whole use of the word "gay" again.  I wrote a piece on that a long time ago and hopefully you saw it.
                i think there is a big difference between trying to really insult and offend someone as opposed to just fun, harmless teasing; know what I mean?

  11. profile image0
    Madame Xposted 7 years ago

    If people have a genuine respect for others, there would be no need for political correctness. After all, that is it's basis. The role of PC was to make people more aware of various speech patterns that they may or may not have understood were offensive. Now that awareness, for the most part, has be raised, PC has outlived it's usefulness.

    In the end though, it all comes down to respect for others.

    1. wyanjen profile image89
      wyanjenposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      yep.

      Words like "retarded" were inadvertently offensive. Originally, PC was not about protecting people's feelings. Unfortunately the movement came about at the same time that people felt all kids should get trophies, just for playing. So PC devolved into something creepy...
      everybody is supposed to win, nobody should lose, and GOD FORBID somebody gets offended **shudder**

      1. qwark profile image61
        qwarkposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Wyan:
        Who? fobid?...lolol

        1. wyanjen profile image89
          wyanjenposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          yeah yeah yeah.

          lol

          There really isn't a good atheist equivalent for that one. I was hoping nobody would call me out.
          I thought about "heaven forbid" but that is even worse.

          lol

          1. qwark profile image61
            qwarkposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            hahaha...gotcha!   :-)

            1. wyanjen profile image89
              wyanjenposted 7 years ago in reply to this

              yes you did.
              I admit, you got me blushing.

              silly atheist...
              lol lol

              How've you been Q? good I hope!

  12. profile image59
    foreignpressposted 7 years ago

    Nobody on this forum feels any guilt for what has happened in this country the past 250 years. You should feel guilt and shame. Then there should be immediate reparations.

    1. profile image0
      Madame Xposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      What?

    2. qwark profile image61
      qwarkposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      You are a very small, narrowminded hubber!
      That was an inane remark! :-)

      1. profile image59
        foreignpressposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Not at all. In fact, that is the basis for most of the rhetoric used by liberals and leftists to justify their arguments.

        1. qwark profile image61
          qwarkposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Foriegn:
          Then what you are saying is that all inhumanity to man, down thru the ages, should be considered and reparations made to all...?
          Man is profoundly involved in his ongoing evolution.
          There are extant people who are experiencing far worse than those in our 200+ years of growth ARE experiencing.
          It's just the "way of man."
          '

        2. profile image0
          Madame Xposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Oh bravo!!

          (hey, he's just telling it like it is smile )

  13. Rod Marsden profile image80
    Rod Marsdenposted 7 years ago

    Telling it like it is happens to be more American if you follow the tradition of the Western which is a genre as American as you can get. There is oft times something uplifting about being honest and straight with people. Dodging around the truth is weak and watery and is producing a generation of people who can't see any profit in talking out differences. If you can't be honest and talk out your differences then there is violence.

    I believe that it started in the universities this political correctness caper. The general idea was that if we can just stop people from saying all the bad words we can stop them thinking the bad words and then stop them from doing the bad things because they can no longer think of them. This is real fuzzy logic at best. It would be lovely if things were this simple but they are not. It is incredibly dangerous in fact to manipulate or try to manipulate people on this level. There are those out there who, when they cannot express themselves verbally or in writing, will turn to fists or worse to get their message across.

    People in my country can no longer talk freely about immigration and violence has come about from that. People in my country can no longer say what they feel about someone else's religious beliefs encroaching upon freedoms people have enjoyed for more than half a century and there has been violence as a result. Allowing people to talk out their differences and possibly arrive at a mutual understanding seems often the best way forward. Talk straight with me and at least I will know where you stand. Dodge and dart around the truth or say nothing and I have no idea what is going on in your head. Like most people I am not a mind reader.

    Words can do harm sure but not saying or saying in a wishy-washy way can do a hell of a lot more harm.

    Political correctness has always been a bad idea as ideas go.

    I am on Jonathan Swift's side. Sometimes you have to shock people with the truth to get positive action happening. When men, women and children were dying from famine in Ireland he attacked the general public in England over the issue because England had the power to do something about it and English politicians were sitting on their hands and doing nothing. He was extremely brutal in his writing but why wouldn't he be? People were dying and he wasn't going to be speaking or writing softly about it. He wanted English people to feel ashamed and to take up action to push their representatives into doing what he saw as what was right. By god he was savage but I admire him for it. My thoughts at any rate.

    1. qwark profile image61
      qwarkposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Rod:
      I applaud your thoughts and words!
      Here, here!

    2. profile image0
      Madame Xposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Brilliant Ron - you hit it dead on. My hat's off to you smile

      1. Rod Marsden profile image80
        Rod Marsdenposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Thanks Qwark and Madame X.

  14. profile image0
    Madame Xposted 7 years ago

    What's the matter you two - are you offended lol

    1. wyanjen profile image89
      wyanjenposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      lol lol

      You guys have a free shot at calling me a hypocrite. I don't usually let the g-word fly at all. HA
      I'm imaging my good friend hollerin' at me, as she does:
      Quit cursing MY god! lol

  15. profile image59
    foreignpressposted 7 years ago

    The English were instrumental in the starvation of tens of thousands of Irish in the 19th Century during the potato famine. As an Irishman (partly so), I demand reparations from the Crown. This is the correct thing to do.

    1. profile image59
      foreignpressposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Further, for over 300 years North African pirates raided villages along the European coast. They took white men, women, and children back to North Africa to be sold as slaves. I demand reparations from Morocco, Algeria, Libya and Egypt for those transgressions.

    2. qwark profile image61
      qwarkposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Foreign:
      lolol...you are a small minded "dreamer."  :-)

      1. Rod Marsden profile image80
        Rod Marsdenposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Well Swift was writing in his own time which was the 19th Century and trying to get the English to do the right thing at that time about the Irish situation. A lot of Irish migrated to the USA and to Australia because of the famine caused by a potato blight. All the English had to do was send grain from northern Ireland to southern Ireland to help the starving people. In some of the years of famine while people were starving to death grain from northern Ireland was actually being shipped to England. Swift thought this was disgraceful.

  16. trish1048 profile image79
    trish1048posted 7 years ago

    I absolutely hate the 'political correctness movement', if that's what you can call it.  I have written a hub about my take on it.

    I suppose 'sticks and stones will break my bones but names will never hurt me' has gone by the wayside, apparently a very long time ago.

  17. Alison Graham profile image93
    Alison Grahamposted 7 years ago

    My favourite quote, usually attributed to Voltaire is (though actually first uesed by Evelyn Beatrice Hall in 1906)"I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it."  Political correctness in UK has gone mad - I think there's a new hub there!

    1. Rod Marsden profile image80
      Rod Marsdenposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Not bad.

  18. profile image0
    selrachposted 7 years ago

    Lets have some non pc jokes.

    A fat bird served me food in McDonalds at lunch time, she said ' sorry about the wait ' I said ' don't worry fatso, you'll lose it eventually '

  19. Rod Marsden profile image80
    Rod Marsdenposted 7 years ago

    An old PC joke.

    A new teacher coming into a class room says:"I'll just write my name with some white chalk..."

    Little girl's hand shoots up and teacher gives her permission to speak.

    Girl: Sir! SIR! You can't say that!. It's racist. it's Caucasian chalk, Sir!"

    "Right! I'll just write my name with Caucasian chalk on the Black board."

    Little girl: "Sir! SIR! Racist! It's an African-American board."

    "Right! African-American board...Oh I don't have any Caucasian chalk after all! I suppose I will have to use yellow chalk."

    "SIR! SIR! SIRE!"

  20. profile image0
    selrachposted 7 years ago

    Just one more before I go.She how must be obeyed is calling.

    I've just come out of the 'chippy' with a meat and potato pie, large chips, mushy peas & a jumbo sausage. A poor homeless man sat there and said 'I've not eaten for two days' I told him 'I wish I had your f***ing will power'

  21. SpanStar profile image59
    SpanStarposted 7 years ago

    The True...You Want THE TRUTH
    YOU CAN'T HANDLE.....well we all know where that came from (sorry just wanted to inject a bit of humor)

    Ladies and gentlemen we can not tell it like it is primarily in my own opinion of course is one word-Lawyers.  But wait they are not fully to blame.  When one of our pressure little offsprings are up in school cusing out the teacher, fighting with other kids, there are those parents that can't see there little darling being anything but victimized by the system so the contact-(oh what a surprise- A Lawyer.)

    If someone tailgates you down the street because they can't find anything else entertaining to do then an accident happens we do we really think they're going to say "Well office seeing has how I have no life I thought it would be fun to harass those strangers and hey I went to far and hit their car."

    Telling it like it is use to mean we were people of integrity, we had dignity.  Now you can see us in the bleachers one half of our bodies colored and wearing cheese on our head.

    Telling it like is-oh those days are go for the most part.

  22. ceciliabeltran profile image84
    ceciliabeltranposted 7 years ago

    I think people want to be free to speak until it's about them. So PC is just to avoid the circumstance where you lash out on somebody for reacting to what you said.


    Example, "I'm sorry we are not hiring women for this job."
    "You're discriminating on me"
    "I'm not, I'm just telling you, deep sea drilling is a man's job."
    "That's sexism, your company is anti-feminist"
    (getting annoyed) "It's nothing personal,we need men for this job!"
    "bigots!"
    "dike!"


    A PC equivalent would be " I'm sorry, we are not hiring people of your profile as of now" "we will put your application on active file."

    "oh, ok, thank you for the opportunity"

    PC is just a way to reduce conflict in the work place, because lets face it there are better things to do than bicker..so walk on eggshells for a few minutes and everybody could go on with their lives. BY all means be honest. But the extent all depends on how much headache you're willing to take on.

  23. tonymac04 profile image87
    tonymac04posted 7 years ago

    I totally agree with Cecilia - why denigrate or insult people? If is it PC to use non-discriminatory language and show a little respect to those who are different, then I'm all for PC. Being PC really has nothing to do with being dishonest.

    1. wilderness profile image94
      wildernessposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Don't think I really agree with you.  A little respect is fine and good, but it often goes way too far with PC.  For instance the term at one time was "nigger".  Then negro, then black, then colored, then african-american.  The only one showing disrespect is the first, and at the time of use was not really a disrespectful term even then.  Just a statement of fact.  What are the others all for?  They all mean the same and none are derogatory - indeed, all were used to be respectful at the beginning.

      As far as "different", you mean the man in the red shirt is different than the man in the green shirt?  No.  You mean (and I'm assuming here) handicapped or deficient in some way.  Calling them "different" merely throws another obstacle in the communication process.

      Some examples of the dishonesty of PC talk:

      undocumented immigrant.  A lie - immigrants have documentation by definition.  They are illegal aliens.

      Chemically challenged.  That might be a diabetic.  But actually is little more than your neighborhood crack head.  "Chemically challenged" is a term to soften the action and make the listener think it is something else.

      Sanitation Engineer would seem to mean someone who is well trained (college or more) in the disposal of our nation's garbage.  But usually it refers to the garbage man emptying your trash can.  Just another attempt to make it sound like something it is not.

      This is not to say that some terms are not derogatory and should not be used.  Homosexual and lesbian are not derogatory terms, just statements of fact.  "Queer", on the other had, IS derogatory.  It was used to mean not only homosexual, but different and therefore undesirable.  Gay is used now, but is also becoming a "bad" word - it also means "stupid" ("That's a gay thing to do.") and is a reflection of using "gay" in the same manner as "queer".

      Having said all that, the PC idea is worse than useless.  A listener can usually tell if a speaker is being insulting by the general topic, the context, body language, etc.  On the other hand, PC talk is often used to either lie or get the listener to believe something else than what is actually being said.  Just do away with it and communicate honestly.  If you mean the poor unfortunate people who come into the US to try and make a better life for themselves without bothering to follow the US laws, then say that!  Don't say undocumented immigrants as that makes a lie out of the term immigrants and gives the listener the impression that the people here illegally are, in fact, immigrants.

    2. Rod Marsden profile image80
      Rod Marsdenposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      The term GAY can be broken up to read Good As You. Also before that part of society made the word their own it meant happy in a lively sort of way. Homosexual was dismissed by the GAY community as too much a medical term to do with what the medical profession saw as a psychological problem. Queer has always meant unusual in an unpleasant way. Bent means out of shape just as straight means having the right shape. And so it goes...

      All words can become bad words as suggested by wildness. At the same token all words can become good words.

      The friends I have in America call themselves Yanks and expect me to do the same. If I called them Americans they'd take it as me being cold and formal with them. For someone who fought in the 2nd World War or in Korea Yank is appropriate because that's what the soldiers were called and there is still a certain pride that can be derived from this nick name "The Yanks are Coming and they won't be back until its over over there." The song of course comes from WW1 but it still means something even to this day and it was CREATED by those Yanks.

      The term Pom comes from cricket and I still call my English friends Poms because they prefer it that way. Both Australians and the British love cricket. It is a national obsession in summer and I see absolutely nothing wrong with that.

      I refuse to bow to political correctness when it comes to how I address my overseas friends.

  24. SpanStar profile image59
    SpanStarposted 7 years ago

    I'm sorry to say but being politically correct stems from the legal system.  Here are just a few terms from a website listed below:

    semiautomatic handgun - Politically correct term: sidearm
    Guns cause crime- Politically correct term: Guns stop crime
    They should take away all the guns Politically correct term: Bad guys first

    There are more terms at the following website:

    http://www.gunlaws.com/politicallycorrect.htm

    1. Rod Marsden profile image80
      Rod Marsdenposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Political Correctness at least in Australia has its roots in the universities. It did, however, migrate into the legal system where it was given teeth.

  25. Rafini profile image85
    Rafiniposted 7 years ago

    Political Correctness is over rated, as stated above.  It began back in the 80's, I believe, because a few disabled people were sick and tired of being considered 'handicapped'.  After all, what is a handicap?  A handicap in golf deals with the score (can't remember which way it goes - it either increases or decreased according to your ability)  Some 'handicapped' people felt the word Disabled was a more accurate term as they felt their legs may be unable to move but there was nothing wrong with their arms or brains! 

    I personally think Political Correctness became a mixed battle cry for those who wish to change vocabulary and for those who wish to effect positive change.

  26. livelonger profile image89
    livelongerposted 7 years ago

    Can someone provide an example of actual (not imagined) political correctness that has crossed the line of being absurd, and what you would have proposed instead?

    1. Shadesbreath profile image91
      Shadesbreathposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Ok, I'll step up:  "retarded"

      It's supposed to be politically incorrect because people who have mentally disabled children get offended by the term.

      A. The term "mentally retarded" is old and has been replaced by numerous other terms more specific to actual metal conditions with unique symptom sets, etc., leaving it perfectly acceptable as a term for conveying/describing things that are, well, retarded.

      B. The offensive term "retarded" is not even the phrase "mentally retarded," the latter requiring the modifier to explain what kind of retarded is being discussed (as opposed to retarded timing in your car, etc) (see #3)

      C. retarded (from the OED):  1. a. The fact of being slowed down or delayed with respect to action, progress, or development; lateness, slowness; (also) a delay or slowing down

        2. In full retard of the tide. = RETARDATION n. 2b(b).

        3. In a motor vehicle: the action of delaying the generation of the ignition spark; an adjustment or device for doing this.
        4. orig. and chiefly N. Amer.
          a. (a) Educ. and Psychol. A person displaying or characterized by developmental delay or learning difficulties (cf. RETARDATION n. 4a) (now rare, not the preferred term); (b) Educ. a child whose educational progress or level of attainment has fallen behind that expected for his or her age (cf. RETARDATION n. 4b) (now rare, not the preferred term).
          b. colloq. and slang (freq. derogatory and offensive, esp. in recent use). A person (or occas. thing) regarded as being mentally or physically deficient, stupid, or incompetent.
        Recorded in U.S. oral use in 1959 in J. E. Lighter's Hist. Dict. Amer. Slang.


      The use of this to describe children is long gone.  The OED shows the transition in the '60s from a medical condition to one that, and I quote the OED here, "replaces 'stupid head' as an insult." 

      The term stupid and idiot and likely others I'm too lazy to find have similar origins.  To be offended is to disallow the acknowledgment of substandard actions or or decisions, whether for humor, conveyance of an idea, or for insult.

      Just my opinion, but you asked for an example.  I'm sure someone can come up with an anecdote for how insulted they were in some instance and thereby justify disqualifying the 100 billion other times the word was used and not offensive at all in intent of the speaker or upon hearing by the audience.

      I propose not caving in and, instead, defending the right of language to have meaning and for homophones to exist as homophones despite having origins that can be taken offensively when retroactive sensitivity is applied to etymology.

      1. Rafini profile image85
        Rafiniposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I'm thinking the parents are offended because the children are offended.  At least that's the case in my house.

    2. BDazzler profile image82
      BDazzlerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      When I was a child, my grandfather said, "It ain't right the way they treat those n**" ... now, he was not using the "n-word" as a pejorative, it was the way he had always heard the word used. In fact, he was in support of the concept of racial equality. 

      As a child I knew that was a "bad word" ... I told him, "You can't say that" ... he said, "Well it ain't right!"

      My grandmother then explained that the polite word was "Negro".

      In my lifetime it has gone from "Negro" to "Colored" to "Afro-American" to "Black" to "African American" ...

      The words keep changing because people are still judged by the color of their skin rather than the content of their character.  When the word is said with a sneer, it doesn't matter what the word is.

      The absurdity is that rather than addressing actual issues of character, the white liberal politicians, who in my opinion are the epitome of racism, keep changing the words rather than changing their hearts.

      Changing the word not only does not change hearts, it slows change.  My grandfather's heart was right, he used the "N" word.  I've seen plenty of people use "African American" with more contempt. 

      That's absurd.

      As to my proposal ... maybe worry more about what I mean rather than which word I use, like my grandfather.

      1. Rod Marsden profile image80
        Rod Marsdenposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Intelligently put BDazzler.

        1. Randy Godwin profile image92
          Randy Godwinposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Same here in Georgia.  The N word was used as a description of an ethnic group not as an insult in many cases.  Sure it was occasionally used as an insult but not everyone. Not defending the use of the word, merely showing the difference in context by mostly older people. 

          But today most realize the insult it is perceived as by black people and is not as prevalent.  I can't see the burden of trying to avoid insulting a downtrodden minority.

          1. Sab Oh profile image61
            Sab Ohposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            And avoiding getting your head handed to you.

          2. BDazzler profile image82
            BDazzlerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            I would find the term "Downtrodden Minority" to be far more condescending than the "N word".

            It would imply to me the person saying it really thought I was inferior, he was just too polite to say so.

            However, as I am not a member of a"downtrodden minority",  it is perhaps, just speculation on my part. But as I only know how I would feel, I am responsible for my own words and behavior and must judge myself accordingly.

            Deliberately insulting anybody is generally not a kind thing to do.  To take insult when none is intended is just as unkind.

    3. EmpressFelicity profile image86
      EmpressFelicityposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I once taught basic skills maths.  My employer (local government) sent me on a course for which I had to write several assignments.  On one of the assignments, my assessor told me that I couldn't write "brain storming" because that would be offensive to epileptics.  I should write "thought showers" instead.

      Cue facepalm:

      http://www.facepalm.org/images/25.jpg

      1. livelonger profile image89
        livelongerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Haha, this was explained here:
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brainstorm … _over_term

        It helps to adjust your language based on what people actually say they find offensive or acceptable, not about what is imagined. smile

        1. EmpressFelicity profile image86
          EmpressFelicityposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Well yeah, that SHOULD go without saying LOL.  But in the corridors of PC, it all too often doesn't.

      2. Rod Marsden profile image80
        Rod Marsdenposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Agreed Empress, A great many epileptics wouldn't make the connection between brain storming and their condition but let's protect them anyway..

        Thought showers, on the other hand, needs explaining every time you use it because it is not in common use.

        Mind you someone could break it down into sprinkling thought rain for those who have barely a thought or two, light thought rain for maybe five or six thoughts, moderate thought rain for a dozen thoughts, heavy thought rain for lots and lots of thoughts, and kick up your heels its cats and dogs and thunder and lightning rain when everyone needs to take shelter from all the ideas zipping around and filling up the desks and waste paper baskets.

  27. livelonger profile image89
    livelongerposted 7 years ago

    I agree with you Shadesbreath about the term 'retarded' (a word I would never, ever use towards a person with a mental disability).

    And BDazzler, I agree that the way something's said can sound more offensive than the word itself, too. I have met people who prefer being called 'black' and others that prefer 'African-American' but I have never, ever met anyone offended when I used the 'wrong' term, just a polite "I prefer to be called 'African-American'" (for example). I don't mind changing based on what someone prefers, and I don't see what the big deal is about calling people what they want to be called.

    1. BDazzler profile image82
      BDazzlerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Yeah, heck, depending on my mood, I may prefer "Dave" or "David" ... but in general I find that it is overly sensitive white people who get all upset over how I refer to someone.  Whites correct me.  Blacks usually laugh at me. (not in a bad way, it's just that Weird AL used me as an archetype when he recorded White and Nerdy ... it's all in good fun.)

    2. Misha profile image75
      Mishaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      OK, from now on please call me "Your Majesty" wink

      1. BDazzler profile image82
        BDazzlerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Very well, "Your Majesty", just remember that you too, still have to go and take a dump and your crap stinks like everybody else's.

        tongue

        All Hail Tzar Misha!

        1. Misha profile image75
          Mishaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Does not matter. Just call me Your Majesty - or I declare you politically incorrect Misha hater tongue

  28. Rochelle Frank profile image89
    Rochelle Frankposted 7 years ago

    I sometimes wonder about the correct term to use when I am writing about some of the people who belong to various native tribes in my area. I asked an 80-year-old woman who is a cultural interpreter in Yosemite National Park, if it was correct to refer to her as  "Indian" or "Native American".
    She said, "Different people have different preferences. I'm an 'American Indian' ".

    1. livelonger profile image89
      livelongerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Exactly. "Different people have different preferences." I have yet to meet an actual (not imagined) person who demanded that their preference be used comprehensively, although I understand that people who obsess about PC-ness imagine they're everywhere.

  29. Cagsil profile image60
    Cagsilposted 7 years ago

    Political correct speech, just recently published a hub about it, but it is seriously lacking and should not be happening.

    It degrades/weakens people, turning them into wimps and giving too many people a weak/soft backbone.

  30. Shadesbreath profile image91
    Shadesbreathposted 7 years ago

    As a sales rep, I could always tell which accounts I was the most solid in by the insults they greeted me with.  The worse their language, the more heinous their assessment of my products, services, morality, physical appearance or even my sexual tendencies, the more stable and safe that account was.

    Any purchasing agent, manager or VP who treated me with polite respect and "proper" language was either a brand new account or one that still thought there was a better option.

    1. Rod Marsden profile image80
      Rod Marsdenposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Often the way Shadesbreath. I feel one of EmpressFelicity's thought showers with maybe a bolt or two of lighting thrown in coming on. Heaven forfend if we are brain storming here.

      Yes I know Empress you haven't knocked brain storming. Just having a little fun here.

  31. thisisoli profile image57
    thisisoliposted 7 years ago

    I hate political correctness, I am from Yorkshire, where there is little bulls**t.

    1. Rod Marsden profile image80
      Rod Marsdenposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      thisisoli, I thought there was cattle in Yorkshire. Well maybe not everywhere in Yorkshire. Maybe more sheep country?

 
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