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Forget Keywords (for a moment)!

  1. Alison Graham profile image92
    Alison Grahamposted 7 years ago

    The English Language is full of rich and descriptive words, many of which are going out of common useage.  There are also many new words coming into use. 
    I recently found out that the proper word for'having a senior moment' and having the inability to remember the right word is, in fact, lethological! 
    In this (often) Keyword-driven medium of the Internet, which are your favourite descriptive words and which do you think should be more used in common English and why?

  2. Origin profile image60
    Originposted 7 years ago

    Plethora, which means an excess of something. I've used it from time to time, and I've always wondered how it worked its way into my vocabulary. It's a word that you only sometimes hear, but not too much.

    smile

    1. Wayne Orvisburg profile image79
      Wayne Orvisburgposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I like plethora too! I use it any chance I get.

      1. Alison Graham profile image92
        Alison Grahamposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I am going to try to use it in the future - it is a much neater way of saying 'an excess of'!.

  3. barryrutherford profile image28
    barryrutherfordposted 7 years ago

    I love the word chronological & serendipity.

  4. Joni Douglas profile image86
    Joni Douglasposted 7 years ago

    How about the word 'Behoove.'  Heard it in a conversation years ago and never forgot it.

    1. Alison Graham profile image92
      Alison Grahamposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      What does it mean Joni?

      1. thisisoli profile image56
        thisisoliposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Behoove is the moral requirement for someone to do something I think.

      2. Joni Douglas profile image86
        Joni Douglasposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        To use it in a sentence...
        'It would behoove you to finish the job.'
        As in, it would be in your best interest.

  5. waynet profile image47
    waynetposted 7 years ago

    Supercalafragilisticexpialadocious

    1. Joni Douglas profile image86
      Joni Douglasposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      All time favorite!

      1. waynet profile image47
        waynetposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Yep it's certainly one I like too!

      2. Alison Graham profile image92
        Alison Grahamposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Supercalafragilisticexpialadocious would be quite hard to work into a HubPages article and is only rated at an av cpc of 4p - still, if I remember rightly in Mary Poppins 'with Tuppence for paper and string you can do almost anything'!

  6. Arthur Fontes profile image89
    Arthur Fontesposted 7 years ago

    I like the word Specificity, though I am kind of intimidated saying it out loud.  I am afraid of having a Sylvester the Cat moment.

    1. Alison Graham profile image92
      Alison Grahamposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I've just tried saying it!  Won't be doing so again! But will definitely try to use it in print, thanks Arthur

  7. Greek One profile image79
    Greek Oneposted 7 years ago

    Smorgasbord

  8. mega1 profile image79
    mega1posted 7 years ago

    I like the sound of "delicious"

  9. LeanMan profile image82
    LeanManposted 7 years ago

    I like stupify.....

  10. LeanMan profile image82
    LeanManposted 7 years ago

    I like stupify.....

  11. iantoPF profile image85
    iantoPFposted 7 years ago

    Amidst the plaethora of words it behooves me to elucidate with specificity the delicious sound of Supercalafragilisticexpialadocious. Not with any desire to stupify but to point out that, as serendipity would have it, the chronological order of the word matches my shopping list; ie.
    I am required to purchase soup, a cauliflower, a new fridge, some rubber bands, eggs, peas, and mints for my bad breath that is;
    Soup a cauli fridge elastic eggs peas halitosis.
    I am now prevented from a lethological moment.
    I thank you (he bows deeply from the waist)

    1. Alison Graham profile image92
      Alison Grahamposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Absolutely fanflippintastic!!  Thank you iantoPF that is brilliant!  Now, can anyone top that??  I doubt it!

    2. Joni Douglas profile image86
      Joni Douglasposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Absolutely Superb iantoPF!

      Anyone care to try  - stupidly?

      1. rmr profile image88
        rmrposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Not a chance! But I'll throw in my own favorite word. I've always liked flummoxed.

        1. Alison Graham profile image92
          Alison Grahamposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          My Mum always used to say that!  Haven't heard that word for years.

    3. earnestshub profile image87
      earnestshubposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Nice! A wordsmith. smile

  12. mega1 profile image79
    mega1posted 7 years ago

    In the category of words that sound exactly like their meanings there is :  crass

    which is one of my all time favorite words.

    crass means lacking in delicacy, or gross.

    1. Alison Graham profile image92
      Alison Grahamposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I agree mega1 - I started this topic because I think that I am not adventurous enough with words,  my all time favourite is mellifluous meaning pleasing to the ear - I think that should also be in the category of words that sound like their meanings.

 
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