jump to last post 1-14 of 14 discussions (32 posts)

What is the best payment type for Amazon if you don't live in the USA

  1. ns1209 profile image34
    ns1209posted 6 years ago

    I was wondering what is the best way to get paid by Amazon if you don't live in the U.S.A?

    I live in the UK and wonder what are the best payment methods

    Sadly I don't have an American bank account so can not receive direct deposits.  This is a shame as I would love this and it only requires a $10 payout - instead of $100!

    The other options are:

    Cheques - OK but this would take ages to arrive, I would lose money when I convert it into £, is a hassle and I read that you have to pay $15 for a cheque or something - is this true. 

    Amazon.com gift card - OK but not sure if I can shop on Amazon.com and things like video games are different format, shipping takes forever and postage s probably loads, not to mention tax when you import it!

    So I was wondering what options do other Amazon affiliates use especially if they live in the UK.

    It is not Amazon's fault but is a little annoying. 

    Could they not let you receive Amazon UK gift cards for a small fee or pay by Paypal?

    So there you go I was just wondering what to do really!

    By the way this is no real criticism of the Amazon Associates program - just looking for advice.

    Thanks in advance for your help!

  2. Mark Knowles profile image60
    Mark Knowlesposted 6 years ago

    Open a dollar bank account with Citibank UK or Lloyds TSB offshore.

    Or - open a trading account with a US based online stock broker. That is basically a bank account.

  3. psycheskinner profile image82
    psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago

    Doesn't Amazon also have a paypal option?  Otherwise it will be a bit of a problem for me too when I head back home.  Foreign checks are not a lot of use once you pays the fees on them.

  4. ns1209 profile image34
    ns1209posted 6 years ago

    Thank you Mark Knowles for your reply.
    So is the best solution just to open an American bank account?  Will look into that.

  5. IzzyM profile image86
    IzzyMposted 6 years ago

    I've not reached minimum payout yet, but I think the cheque fee only applies in the US. For a UK bank account, it is your own bank that will take a cashing fee, and that will vary from bank to bank.
    I'm in Spain and just KNOW, without asking, that they will take an arm and a leg, greedy gits, so I've asked Amazon to send me a cheque when I reach $1,000. Obviously I can change my mind on this at any time after reaching minimum payout.
    I hadn't considered opening a dollar account, it might be an option.

    1. Jenna May Swan profile image60
      Jenna May Swanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Izzy,

      La Caixa don't charge too much - usually around 12 euros per cheque but it depends on the amount.  They do though take about a month to clear!!!!!!!!!!!

      1. IzzyM profile image86
        IzzyMposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        There isn't one of them near me. I wouldn't touch the CAM with a barge pole. The Santander were cashing foreign cheques in less than 2 weeks for a while but now they are back to 4 weeks.
        I suppose I might be able to post my cheque to my UK account? It'll be faster if nothing else...

  6. Rik Ravado profile image93
    Rik Ravadoposted 6 years ago

    Agree it is a problem. I live in the UK and used to take the gift cards but it is a pain having to pay trans Atlantic carriage.  I am now going for the dollar cheque (no fee if you are in the UK) but there is still the fee to cash the cheque.

    Adsense is so much better with direct bank transfer and Ebay pays via Paypal.

  7. ns1209 profile image34
    ns1209posted 6 years ago

    OK what I am going to do is set the limit high to $500 I think and then look into the possibility of opening a US account! 

    Thanks for telling me at least there is no fee for cheques in the UK.  The thing is I know the bank will keep about a quarter of my money if I get a foreign cheque!

  8. IzzyM profile image86
    IzzyMposted 6 years ago

    I think you need to ask you bank what the charge is. If its a set fee of, say, £20, then that is a big cut from $100, but if the charge is £20 no matter how high the cheque then you are maybe better waiting for the bigger cheque.
    If they take a percentage of the value, then open a dollar account with a forein bank. Mind you they likely have high charges too, if not for that then for something else.

  9. ns1209 profile image34
    ns1209posted 6 years ago

    Thanks it is a no win situation really!  May just go with large cheques!

    1. 0
      ryankettposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Its a win-win situation with the current exchange rate, solely for UK people with an American income wink

  10. 0
    ryankettposted 6 years ago

    I am UK too.

    I have plumped for setting payout high.... $500 actually wink and taking the hit with the bank fees. I think that HSBC charges about £9 for a standard US cheque, as an example.

    The exchange rate is really in our favour for incoming cash, $500 is about £347 right now.

    Bearing in mind that the exchange rate was $2 to the pound just 2 years ago, so $500 would have been worth approx £250, I find £338 a more than acceptable amount to be left with!

    1. psycheskinner profile image82
      psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Although you also have to keep in mind that you pay tax onn the full amount sad.  I would be surprised if you could open a US bank account as an out-of-country non-citizen, but if anyone finds out how to do it, please let us know!

      1. Mark Knowles profile image60
        Mark Knowlesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Well - I listed two banks that you can open a US$ bank account at. I am sure there are more.

        1. barryrutherford profile image31
          barryrutherfordposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Just about any bank will if they like you !  tongue

          1. Mark Knowles profile image60
            Mark Knowlesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            I take it you have never been in an English bank then? wink

            1. frogdropping profile image85
              frogdroppingposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Uk banks - you need references, money (duh), a good address, a good credit score, regular money coming in. You are interviewed, pretty much, then usually told 'no'. Ridiculous.

              I went into a Portuguese bank, announced what I wanted, showed my i.d., signed my name and that was pretty much it! They used a method whereby I was restricted in what I could do for a little while - once I'd proved I wasn't a fraudulent type, everything was cool.

              That's how it should be. Given a chance, once proven everyone's a winner!

        2. psycheskinner profile image82
          psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Have you actually done it or know someone who has (from outside the conountry). 

          Because when I moved to the US the banks required, legally, proof ofa US residential address.  I know that will I was in the US I was unable to open a NZ account (where I am a citizen) because I had to be physially present in hte bank to open the account.  And even as a US reisdent I cannot open a US brokerage account as you must be a citizen.

          1. psycheskinner profile image82
            psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            p.s. A non-US citizen with have 0 credit score in the US.

            1. 0
              ryankettposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              My girlfriend was given a US bank account within 3 days of moving to America and still has it 2 years after moving out....

          2. Mark Knowles profile image60
            Mark Knowlesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            LOL

            Yes - Would you like me to do it for you? I will only charge a nominal amount. wink

            1. WriteAngled profile image91
              WriteAngledposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Mark, does a dollar account set up with Citibank in the UK count as a US account for Amazon purposes.

              Re comments on currency games, in my translation business I have clients who pay me in sterling, others who pay me in euros, and others who pay me in US dollars. My availability for any given client, apart from regulars with whom I have a good relationship,varies according to the strength of each currency. With sterling abysmally low, I've done well favouring euro and dollar paying clients recently.

              1. Mark Knowles profile image60
                Mark Knowlesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Yes. It is a bank account in US dollars - much as I despise Citibank - they will open an account for you in dollars. It is not an account in the US though - so they will have to send a check. No fees.

                1. psycheskinner profile image82
                  psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  It is in US dollars but it is a UK account, are you sure they won;t charge fee for depositing an American check--becuase from what I read on their webste, they do.

                  1. Mark Knowles profile image60
                    Mark Knowlesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    LOLOL

      2. 0
        ryankettposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        If you are a UK Citizen, based in the UK, then your Amazon income is taxable irrespective of whether the payment goes into a US or UK bank account. There is no legal way of avoiding UK income tax unless you exile yourself and obtain citizenship in another country. A US bank account does not change that.

  11. ns1209 profile image34
    ns1209posted 6 years ago

    Good point Ryankett - at least the exchange rate being so bad has some positive effects!  I think I will just settle for a large payout amount then! 

    If I do well with Amazon I may consider opening an American account. 

    Thanks to everyone for their advice and assistance!

  12. 0
    eternaltreasuresposted 6 years ago

    I think cheque is the best way. I also live outside US and I selected PAYMENT BY CHEQUE

    1. psycheskinner profile image82
      psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Have you deposited one yet.  When I was in NZ depositing a US check cost about $30.

  13. brettb profile image69
    brettbposted 6 years ago

    I pay in US checks all the time. Make sure you write your name in the endorsement area on the back, then just pay it into your UK account. The cashier will be a bit puzzled but banks have a special form for it.

    Check the charges first - Halifax charges £10 a check so hold your Amazon payments until you get something substantial (Natwest was £10.50 last time I used them). I hold all my affiliate accounts until I get $500 in them.

  14. waynet profile image46
    waynetposted 6 years ago

    My last months amazon earnings were about $456 ish and from that I recieved in english money £314 and some pence, minus the £10 for the fee from my bank, although often I have switched the payment to gift certificates to buy some books from amazon.com too, it would be nice if they did put paypal as an option, but I'm not fussed.

    Cheques take longer to recieve and to process, but if you can roughly work out when you'll need the money then all the better!

 
working