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LATIN

  1. De Greek profile image84
    De Greekposted 6 years ago

    Does anyone speak Latin, please?

    1. CASE1WORKER profile image85
      CASE1WORKERposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      i did wo years but have a friend who did a bit more - what with you being greek thought you would ace it

    2. Pcunix profile image90
      Pcunixposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Speak it?

      No.  I had 4 years of it and barely remember a thing.

    3. KeithTax profile image80
      KeithTaxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      It is all Greek to me.

      Cogito ergo sum

  2. 0
    ralwusposted 6 years ago

    et tu greek?

  3. De Greek profile image84
    De Greekposted 6 years ago

    FOR A JOKE:

    I am preparing a Coat of Arms (CoA) for my sons and my nephews, based on a family joke OF Extreme cowardice and crudeness, with occasional tiny bravery and refinement :-))
    So the CoA will show the Empirical Double Headed Eagle of the Bysantine Empire but with modifications:

    One eagle head will be that of a mouse and the other head that of a lion (cowardice and bravery).

    A shepherd's staff signifying ignorance and crudeness in one paw and a flower signifying culture in the other

    I am trying to fit in a chicken for cowardice

    I want to find a suitable motto for this CoA in Latin. If anyone can help with a translation from English to Lati, please help in preparing this joke.

    If you w3ant you can also contribute to the idea of the motto :-))

    1. Rafini profile image85
      Rafiniposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Maybe the chicken can be front and center facing forward (instead of to the side)

      1. De Greek profile image84
        De Greekposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Yes, but I cannot find teh proper clip art for this. I agree taht it would have been good, but ... :-))

  4. Ohma profile image80
    Ohmaposted 6 years ago

    Of Pugna vel Fuga , Nos sumo ut run amo Abyssus.


    Of Fight or Flight, We choose to run like H*ll.

    http://www.translation-guide.com/free_o … p;to=Latin

    1. De Greek profile image84
      De Greekposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Ohma, this is great!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  Excellent motto in the spirit of the joke!

      Many, many thanks!

      1. Ohma profile image80
        Ohmaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Glad You approve.

        1. De Greek profile image84
          De Greekposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Ohma, ther is a problem though: The translator did not recognise teh words "OF"  and "RUN"

          Any solutions, please?

          1. katiem2 profile image61
            katiem2posted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Did you Google a picture search for that?  bet you could find it that way.

  5. Sab Oh profile image61
    Sab Ohposted 6 years ago

    Dead, vulgar language

  6. Ohma profile image80
    Ohmaposted 6 years ago

    Inter Pugna quod Fuga nos ver amo abyssus

    Between Fight and flight we sprint like h*ll

  7. Aficionada profile image91
    Aficionadaposted 6 years ago

    What does "amo" mean in this sense?  or is it supposed to read "veramo"?  Still doesn't quite make sense, because the verb doesn't agree with the pronoun "nos."  See if you can find another site to refine it further.

    1. Ohma profile image80
      Ohmaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I have looked for a better translator but I do not speak Latin perhaps you could help us out?

  8. Aficionada profile image91
    Aficionadaposted 6 years ago

    I'd like to, but I have a problem.  What's the time frame here?

    I promised myself 5 min. to check things on HP before doing some other really important things IRL, and it's already been at least 35.  smile  My Latin skills are pretty rusty, so I'll have to take some time to refresh myself.

    Amo means "I love."

    I can come back in about an hour and work on this.  If you have time, in the meantime, just search "run," "rush," "sprint," and "hurry" through the translator and bring all of those words back and then I'll see what I can do.  Thanks!

  9. Ohma profile image80
    Ohmaposted 6 years ago

    run, " " vado " " ver " " volito "

    run rush sprint hurry

  10. Ohma profile image80
    Ohmaposted 6 years ago

    Maybe this one will make sense
    inter pugna quod fuga planto a velox verto

    "Between fight and flight make a quick retreat"

    1. De Greek profile image84
      De Greekposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Really good of you Ohma. Many thanks :-))

  11. Rafini profile image85
    Rafiniposted 6 years ago

    Kewl!  cool  Great job Ohma!! smile

  12. Shalini Kagal profile image79
    Shalini Kagalposted 6 years ago

    Veni, Vidi, Fugi?

    1. De Greek profile image84
      De Greekposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Shalini, thank you. It is under consideratin as of now :-)

  13. Aficionada profile image91
    Aficionadaposted 6 years ago

    Shalini Kagal's is a great motto, simple and straightforward: I came, I saw, I fled; and it's a parody of Caesar's Veni, Vidi, Vici - I came, I saw, I conquered.

    I love Ohma's idea:  "Between fight and flight, make a quick retreat."  The idea and the image are perfect; but it has enough colloquialisms and idiomatic language that it is difficult to translate, especially using a computerized translator.  The closest thing to what Ohma has suggested, that I can come up with, would probably be:

    Pugnare vel fugere, velociter terga vertiamus.

    = To fight or to flee? - we would swiftly turn and fly.

    Maybe even better: 

    Fugare vel fugere, velociter terga vertiamus.
    (To put to flight or to flee?...)

    I confess, I'm not totally certain of the word order.  I hope others will contribute their knowledge.

    1. De Greek profile image84
      De Greekposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Aficionada, many thanks

      I shall try to have this verified :-))

  14. De Greek profile image84
    De Greekposted 6 years ago

    You guys are being a great help. Thank you all very much.

    While searching for a final suitablemotto, the temporary one I have settled for is an abreviation of Ohma' suggestion and it is "leave in haste"- the diplomatic version of

    RUN LIKE HELL! :-)))

  15. De Greek profile image84
    De Greekposted 6 years ago

    I wish I knew how to put the thing up for you guys to have a laugh, but I don't know how to do it

    1. Ohma profile image80
      Ohmaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Where is the pic? if it is on the web just give me a site address.

  16. Joy56 profile image60
    Joy56posted 6 years ago

    my mum learned latin at school, she once told me even though it was considered a dead language, it helped her so much, as lots of words are derived from latin words.  It sure helped her with crosswords, apparantly

  17. Aficionada profile image91
    Aficionadaposted 6 years ago

    Great!  Yes, I think it best for you to verify it.  I had a lot of Latin classes, but many decades ago.  I've only used it (i.e. translating - not vocab, which I use every single day) in the past two years to help my son in his Latin classes.

    "Leave in haste" should work well to mean "run like hell."  I realized belatedly that the "amo" (I love/like) of an earlier version came from "like." That was why I mentioned the problem with idioms.

    [Final note:  I've omitted the macrons, the signs for the long vowels, which might be used in an online translator; but they would most likely not be present on a coat of arms motto.

    Shalini, do you know whether I'm right about that?]

  18. Rafini profile image85
    Rafiniposted 6 years ago

    http://ts2.mm.bing.net/images/thumbnail.aspx?q=118291112957&id=bd611effff4c51c5289495de8e602d67&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.clker.com%2fcliparts%2f6%2fe%2f4%2fe%2f1245696568353635238bloodsong_Chicken-RoundCartoon.svg.hi.png


    this is the only one I found.  Bing.com images - searched for chicken clip art.

  19. mysterylady 89 profile image60
    mysterylady 89posted 6 years ago

    i am really impressed.  I studied three years of Latin in h.s. and still can recite the beginning of Caesar and the beginning of "The Aeneid" but cannot begin to do what you all are doing!

  20. 0
    ralwusposted 6 years ago

    http://thm-a03.yimg.com/nimage/fb7c277fd8f354c2
    validus gallo flees amo ignavus befitting

    I don't know if this is correct, but . . .

  21. De Greek profile image84
    De Greekposted 6 years ago

    Thank you everyone. THE FINAL IS NOT ONLINE. ISHALL PUT IT UP ON HUB TOMORROW FOR YOU TO SEE THE WORK YOU HAVE DONE !!!!! :-))
    THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!

  22. De Greek profile image84
    De Greekposted 6 years ago

    OK you lot, I have posted the end result of our communal efforts as hub and you can see the Coat of Arms here: http://hubpages.com/hub/For-those-who-helped-with-Latin

    Many thanks again for your help :-))

  23. Aficionada profile image91
    Aficionadaposted 6 years ago

    Latin Update:

    Hi, again...  The coat of arms is indeed awesome.  It looks so "real," so authentic, and so fitting for what you have described! It is bound to be a source of great fun and (yes!) even pride for all of your family. smile

    You might want to know, though, that the motto does not quite mean what you intend.  "Licentio" means leave in the sense of permission, as in the phrase "I give you leave."  You can see the relation in the English word license.  The kind of leave you mean would be better expressed as depart; that might be a better word to run through a translator.  I haven't found the word "festinatio," so I don't know its exact meaning.

    Latin uses word endings to express different forms of a noun or verb, and a computerized translator will not give the correct ending, unless you know how to interpret what it sends back to you.  It may not really matter to you whether the endings or even the actual word are "correct" Latin; but since you had asked for input yesterday, I thought it only fair to let you know.

    The image on the coat of arms is really stunning!  I think you may have a second (or third... or fourth...) career designing them for people! big_smile  You definitely have a great gift for doing so.

  24. Shalini Kagal profile image79
    Shalini Kagalposted 6 years ago

    Aficionada - I do believe you're right!
    'Festinatio' would mean in a hurry.

  25. De Greek profile image84
    De Greekposted 6 years ago

    Aficionada, thank you very much for your input. I have had my suspicions about this and we really have to find someone who speaks the language to guide us I think  that it is a good joke, but ther was no talent needed to modify an exisitng image. Many thanks for your help

    1. Aficionada profile image91
      Aficionadaposted 6 years ago in reply to this



      Well, since it is no longer spoken as a living language, it's hard to find someone who "speaks" it. It is popularly called a dead language. Anyone who knows any Latin today has learned it from books and teachers.

      I could give you several different options for "depart in haste," but I don't think any of them would have the same terrific impact as Shalini's "Veni, vidi, fugi."  I mentioned that motto at supper last night, and my husband just about choked from laughing so hard.  He has never had Latin classes, but he is familiar with Julius Caesar's quote "Veni, vidi, vici" (I came, I saw, I conquered).  And he, like a lot of other people might do, was able to recognize in "fugi" the same word as in "tempus fugit" (time flies).  So he caught the gist and the humor of it right away. (Translated it would be "I came, I saw, I fled.")

      If you still want to hear other options, I could give you some, but I do not believe they would be as poetic or as pithy as "Veni, vidi, fugi."

  26. De Greek profile image84
    De Greekposted 6 years ago

    Shalini, thank you for taking the trouble to contribute :-))
    However, we need someone to put a proper phrase together. Thank you! :-))

  27. De Greek profile image84
    De Greekposted 6 years ago

    Aficionada, many thanks for your kindness in pursuing this.

    I understand your point and my only reluctance is that the suggestion is rather obvious to many. I am a great fun of the hidden meaning or the phrase which can be interpreted by ourselves when someone asks what the meaning is, in an IMAGINATIVE way :-))) That would increase the fun.

    If you can find any other suggestions for consideration I would be very much in your debt, without excluding Shalini's excellent suggestion.

    Many thanks again

    1. Aficionada profile image91
      Aficionadaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Sorry I didn't see this earlier - busy morning IRL. smile  If you still want some ideas, may I do some of this in a thinking-out-loud fashion?  There are numerous nuances that can enter the picture, so I may muddle the matter, rather than clarifying it.

      First - in the other great suggestion (Leave/Depart in haste), would you be specific about the verb form you want?  I mean, is this a type of imperative, a command (instructions to the family - "Leave! Depart!")?  Or would you want it to lean more towards a statement of fact (indicative) such as "We leave/depart in haste" ("that's just who we are and what we do")?  Another possible type of verb form would be a verb used as a noun (such as an infinitive or gerund): to leave/to depart or leaving/departing.  The specific ending of the verb will depend on which of these forms (or any other form) you choose.

      Then, when I looked up depart on the Latin-help site I prefer (www.archives.nd.edu), I found a whole bunch of possible words.  At the top of the list for me were discedere, deserere, and linquere.  Some of the related English words would be "desert" and "relinquish."  (Discedere is related to words such as "concede, accede, recede," etc.)

      I discovered another great word to use for "in haste," but it is almost certainly too esoteric for most people.  I didn't know this meaning until I was grubbing around for possible words.  Anyway, the word is tumultuarius - you can see the relation to the words "tumult and tumultuous."  But what is so great about the Latin word (for this purpose) is that it was used to describe military troops that were gathered together hastily.  There are (at least) two different ways to use it, and the ending will depend on which way is chosen.

      I sort of liked the "fugare vel fugere" idea, because of what you mentioned here - not being quite so obvious and being a lot of fun to explain.  The two words look so similar and have a similar sound, but their meanings are close to being opposites.  Fugare = to rout or put to flight (as soldiers might do) and fugere = to  flee, "fly," "depart in haste" (as some other soldiers might do).  Y'know - discretion is the better part of valor, and all that.

      Let me know what you think of some of these words, and I'll see what I can put together for you.  One option (among multitudes) would be: 

      Fugare vel fugere, tumultuariter deseramus

      (= "To rout or to flee, may we desert tumultuously" - That's sort of literal; a more everyday way to say it would be: "Fight or flight? let's scatter!")

      1. De Greek profile image84
        De Greekposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I am ashamd of myself. Ihad assumed that you had enough of me and that you would not spend so much time on this.

        THANK YOU VERY MUCH!

        I asked the designer to use - veni, vidi, fugi 

        I am eternally greatful for your kindness. I shall post the final version online, on my story

        http://hubpages.com/hub/For-those-who-helped-with-Latin

        PROJECT now ENDED :-))

        1. Aficionada profile image91
          Aficionadaposted 6 years ago in reply to this



          I think that is a wonderful motto, and I am glad you chose it.  Please don't feel bad or misunderstand the enthusiasm I put into the project in any way.  I truly love this sort of work, and I have been grateful for the opportunity to do it.  If only a Hub about it would draw a lot of clicks and Amazon purchases, I wouldn't need to write any other kind of Hubs at all (lol) lol lol lol!

          Congratulations on the successful end of a very attractive and appealing undertaking!

  28. Pearldiver profile image87
    Pearldiverposted 6 years ago

    I Always Wanted To Study Latin when I was at school..
    She was so beautiful and many failed to get their tongues around her!
    Carp Diem... I was told hmm
    So I Did...
    But her Father Founda ma Ladder and Broka ma Face lol

 
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