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Are you worried about your accent?

  1. profile image0
    T_Diamondposted 6 years ago

    I come from Russia, but having lived in New Zealand for almost 10 years, I've lost a lot of my Russian accent. To a point, where people wouldn't mistake me for a foreigner lol.

    I have a slight accent, but only the very slight. Unlike my mum and dad who still have a strong Russian accent and they get picked out straight away like black on white.

    What about you, do you have an accent? Are you worried people can't understand what you're trying to say?

    1. yenajeon profile image81
      yenajeonposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Accents are SEXY! Nobody needs to be ashamed of their accents. Everyone loves accents.

      My father came to this country in college so he also has an accent. We just make the whole thing a joke and it's not a problem.

      1. profile image0
        T_Diamondposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Awesome! big_smile

  2. worldgrandeur profile image67
    worldgrandeurposted 6 years ago

    I also used to have a clear strange accent, but the remnants now are very tiny and few........ I'm blending in... smile

  3. Joy56 profile image60
    Joy56posted 6 years ago

    i have an accent from Manchester,very common, and very like the people on Coronation Street.  People either love it or hate it.....  It stands up well in an argument, as it is already a bit aggressive to start with.

    My husband is from Liverpool now there is an accent.

  4. lrohner profile image85
    lrohnerposted 6 years ago

    I don't have an accent. smile

  5. Kangaroo_Jase profile image82
    Kangaroo_Jaseposted 6 years ago

    I have an accent for most occasions big_smile

  6. Misha profile image74
    Mishaposted 6 years ago

    I don't care for the most part, as long as I can get the message across. Autoresponders hate me, though lol

  7. Pearldiver profile image88
    Pearldiverposted 6 years ago

    Sure my accent gets in the way.... And I'm sure if you are a JAFA then your accent will be easily identified hmm
    Unlike yours I have a Kiwi Accent roll lol

    1. Kangaroo_Jase profile image82
      Kangaroo_Jaseposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Beeched Is , Bro big_smile (Bad Kiwi accent said by an Australian, but typed out) lol

  8. LeanMan profile image81
    LeanManposted 6 years ago

    I don't have any accent, it is everybody else that has one...

    1. profile image0
      T_Diamondposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Haha, that's a good way to think about it!

  9. earnestshub profile image88
    earnestshubposted 6 years ago

    Never worry about accents as long as I can understand what is being said. smile I guess I have an Australian accent, but not to another Australian.

  10. Pcunix profile image89
    Pcunixposted 6 years ago

    Ah'm from Bahstin Mass.  We don't have accents. 

    Though.. My family moved up from South Carolina just before I was born, so my older sisters still had accents as I learned to talk.  Give me a few beers and a little drawl will come out.  Even without beer, I'll say "y'all" now and then.

    1. Pearldiver profile image88
      Pearldiverposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      So No Rushin about and it slips out huh? yikes

    2. Lisa HW profile image84
      Lisa HWposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I was born and raised in the Boston area, and being a "verbal person", I think the whole language thing is particularly ingrained (no, embedded) in my brain.  It's hopeless.  I hate the Boston accent, but it's in every syllable I say.  Last month I was talking to a guy from California and he said he was trying to figure out what country my accent was from!

      When I knew I had to be the example for my little kids I cleaned up some of the most horrible parts of the Boston accent (and they don't have it the way I do).  It's there, though.  Fortunately, it isn't the same accent we hear when people are being interviewed on the news about crime incidents.  It's "the other" one - slightly modified.  I hate it.   All my phones have the pre-recorded voicemail lady because of it.   mad

      1. profile image0
        T_Diamondposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Wow, what a story, thx for sharing!

    3. Chaotic Chica profile image84
      Chaotic Chicaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Ha ha! My husband is from Mass (Brockton/Onset areas) and he moved to SC four years ago! Every so often, my name gains an R, or if he's really tired, everything else loses that R!
      I grew up in NJ and hated having that Jersey accent.  I have been gone from there for twelve years now and have a fairly respectable drawl but when I get tired or angry, the old Jersey kicks in thick! When my brother division at boot camp decided that I said dog cute (dawg), I decided that if I was going to put Jersey behind me, the accent was going to have to go! LOL I hate it but I've come to just accept it for what it is!

  11. jacobkuttyta profile image48
    jacobkuttytaposted 6 years ago

    not at all

  12. khmohsin profile image61
    khmohsinposted 6 years ago

    I have British accent, the problem is only understanding american accent.

  13. camlo profile image83
    camloposted 6 years ago

    I have an English accent when I speak German, and hate it when people comment on it, which they do all the time - especially complete strangers. It's the only thing that stops me from being a perfectly normal person here.
    In English, I never had a regional accent. When I speak it nowadays, nodody can tell where I come from, but that's the result of not having lived in an English speaking country for more than 20 years.

  14. profile image0
    ralwusposted 6 years ago

    I only use mine when I am out of state.

  15. prettydarkhorse profile image63
    prettydarkhorseposted 6 years ago

    I have strong accent, but they understand me, I am not ashamed then I also used the English language in dictionary so I am not used to slang yet, Different people have different level in understanding me here, some whites understand me more than the blacks here at Dallas. Moreso with the Latinos, they just ask again what I just said. I just used my smile many times. I am not worried about it, I would like for others to understand me more.

  16. timorous profile image92
    timorousposted 6 years ago

    It's funny how many people, even in English-speaking countries don't think they have an accent, until someone points it out to them or asks where they're from.  They usually think the other person is the one with the accent.

    I'm from Canada, originally from Toronto, where you'll hear every language on the face of the earth.  Some accents are very thick and impenetrable.  But after a while you recognize the many characteristics in the accents and can figure out what they're trying to say.  You do have to be patient and understanding though, or else you'll just get frustrated and give up or ask for a translation from someone else.

    I'm sure it's just as frustrating to the person with the "accent", trying to be understood, and perhaps being embarrassed and awkward.

  17. SomewayOuttaHere profile image61
    SomewayOuttaHereposted 6 years ago

    we all have an accent....

    1. camlo profile image83
      camloposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Very true - but it's not always convenient ...

      1. SomewayOuttaHere profile image61
        SomewayOuttaHereposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        what do you mean...it's not convenient...haven't read all the posts...

        1. camlo profile image83
          camloposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          It's annoying when people keep asking you questions about it.

          Some guests (when I'm working), tell me they've just had a guessing game about where I come from - am I Dutch, French or Polish? Am I American or British?

          When they know the answer, I often get smiled at gormlessly, stared at as though I were a strange curiosity, then asked a million questions. It happens several times a day.

      2. profile image0
        T_Diamondposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        very true.. hehe

    2. Pcunix profile image89
      Pcunixposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Yes, we know.  We are just joking when we say we don't.

      Most of my customers would recognize my voice within three words, just from the heavy Boston accent.

      Our oldest daughter moved to Virginia 24 years ago and she now says we sound funny!

      1. Lisa HW profile image84
        Lisa HWposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        My former in-laws were from another state, and you'd think, based on their frequent comments, I came from Mars.   lol  You know there's an issue when you speak perfectly distinct English and someone in another state still says he was trying to figure out what country you're from.  lol

        1. camlo profile image83
          camloposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          It's the Gay Games in Cologne at the moment - a huge sporting event. The city is full of English speakers, so that should be easy for me - you'd think.
          Part of my job involves serving tables on a ship (waiting). In spite of my speaking perfectly clear, fluent English, with no regional accent the whole time, the English speakers still insist on communicating by use of charades. In the end, I just have to tell them that I'd understand far better if they were to actually speak.

  18. Dolores Monet profile image92
    Dolores Monetposted 6 years ago

    We all have an accent, if we go somewhere else! I love to  hear an accent - a different way of how words sound, the sound of someone new to an area, or new to a language is like music to my ears!

  19. manlypoetryman profile image77
    manlypoetrymanposted 6 years ago

    Not much...Everyone understands "Texan" where I'm from...

  20. Christene profile image81
    Christeneposted 6 years ago

    I'm from the Boston area too. smile

    My parents have horrible accents but I don't. I pronounce my Rs where they should be. LOL

    I think it's from growing up singing. We had to annunciate in chorus and it made it's way in to my every day voice.

    1. Lisa HW profile image84
      Lisa HWposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I used to feel bad when "ridiculed" by people over the "r thing".  Then I realized, though, that if you listen to people from the UK they don't do that ridiculous over-sounding of their 'r's" either.  A lot of the Boston area accent is either English/Irish based and some is more Italian based (that's not mine).  So, I decided I"m not going to feel bad if it happens a lot of Boston people inherited an English that has strong roots in the original language, rather than being some mutated version of English that happened as a result of, say, Swedish people coming here and having different accents.

      So, that's my story and I'm sticking to it.   lol    (What I hate about my own, and a lot other Boston-area people's) accent is the "short-clipping" of so many syllables.

      (If nothing else, this thread will let people with accents from other countries know that a lot of us with no non-English accent squirm about our own accents too.    smile  )

    2. Pcunix profile image89
      Pcunixposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I ship my R's down South where they have a use for them.

  21. Arthur Fontes profile image89
    Arthur Fontesposted 6 years ago

    Fall River the city I am from has its own unique accent.  Unlike a Boston accent most people ask if I am from New York.

    Its not just me all of us in Fall Riva have da same accent.

    1. profile image0
      Home Girlposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      The problem is not with an accent, but how YOU feel about it. If it's okay with you and most people understand you - who cares. No one hears you on Hubpages anyway.
      May be because I live in Toronto and everybody around speaks with some kind of an accent, I feel like that. May be, because  I work among Russian community and everybody around(predominantly) speaks Russian. My wish is always to be able to write better, to express myself better in English language. I never feel it 100%, like I feel Russian, that is my native language, and that I can feel more subtly, more adequately. But I live in an English speaking country now and want to be part of it. I read a lot of English literature - Canadian, American, British, as much as I can handle time-wise.

      1. Arthur Fontes profile image89
        Arthur Fontesposted 6 years ago in reply to this



        Have you tried listening to books on cd in English?  Talk Radio?

        I know talk radio has helped me expand my vocabulary and pronunciation.

        1. profile image0
          Home Girlposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I started learning English by listening BBC radio in my old country when I was in High School. They had a program "Theatre of the Air" that broadcasted plays and that helped me a lot then. Unfortunately there is a limit to everything. English is NOT my native language and I don't have super skills.

          1. Arthur Fontes profile image89
            Arthur Fontesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            By reading your hubs, I would not know that English was not your native language. Very well written and easy to understand.

  22. Cagsil profile image60
    Cagsilposted 6 years ago

    No!

    1. profile image0
      Home Girlposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      You see my point?

  23. ohmygoodnessrae profile image60
    ohmygoodnessraeposted 6 years ago

    I don't have an accent, but I'm from Texas. Whenever I visit Chicago to see my family, they always tell me my "accent" is interesting. lol.
    I love hearing different accents! big_smile

  24. Diane Inside profile image85
    Diane Insideposted 6 years ago

    of course everyone has an accent when they are away from home. Even here in the U.S. southerns accents are so much different than northern accents.

    I live in Kentucky, and my uncle lives in New York. I sometimes have a hard time understanding him.

    And even what they call things is different.

    Such as where we live we have a living room, yet up where he lives they call it the front room.

    They say out to the kitchen, we say in the kitchen.

    It's just interesting, that this is primarily a english speaking country, yes accents and even slang is different depending on which part of the country you are in.

  25. habee profile image90
    habeeposted 6 years ago

    I have a terrible (or wonderful) Southern drawl!

  26. MayG profile image86
    MayGposted 6 years ago

    When I was living in the U.S.  I was very self-conscious of my Australian accent.  Most of the time I could be understood, but I do remember being in a cafe with my partner and my partner drew a picture on the paper tablecloth of two aliens sitting at a table, because the waiter just could not understand us.  Another time we were in the supermarket and a woman came up to us and asked us what language we were speaking!  So yes, then I did feel self conscious because I couldn't always be understood.
    But there are a lot of different Australian accents.  I grew up in country Victoria and when I moved to Melbourne to start university, I was suddenly very aware of how harsh my accent sounded, how 'ocker' it was, compared to the private school city kids. People can so easily be judged by their accents.

  27. profile image0
    sord87posted 6 years ago

    i do not have accent but i own a Hyundai accent gls!

  28. profile image0
    klarawieckposted 6 years ago

    Not when all I'm doing is tying.  lol

  29. timorous profile image92
    timorousposted 6 years ago

    I like to accentuate the positive smile

  30. Rafini profile image85
    Rafiniposted 6 years ago

    What accent?  From what I can tell I talk like the majority of people on TV and in movies....You know, the people not from New York or Down South or another country. hmm  lol  Yeah, guess I'd hafta say I'm mainstream American....hmm

  31. Anolinde profile image87
    Anolindeposted 6 years ago

    Hmm .. I was born and raised in Bangkok, but my dad's from Chicago so I think I have a midwestern accent.  I've never had any problems with people understanding me (and most people here in Japan say my accent is easy to understand), so I guess my accent's kinda mainstream as well.  I love accents, though, especially English and Scottish smile  Big turn on! tongue

    1. camlo profile image83
      camloposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Mine's English smile

  32. rmcrayne profile image94
    rmcrayneposted 6 years ago

    I am from South Carolina.  I did a 6 week internship at a large skilled nursing complex in Wisconsin and was ridiculed for my accent.  One of the elderly German immigrants was particularly brutal to me.  He equated ‘Southern accent’ with ‘stupid’.  Granted this was over 20 years ago.  He actually asked me if I knew Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker personally!

    1. Chaotic Chica profile image84
      Chaotic Chicaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      No offense, but some the people in SC fit the bill! I'm careful not to group everyone together but people in the county I moved to certainly don't do the stereotype any favors!

      1. rmcrayne profile image94
        rmcrayneposted 6 years ago in reply to this
  33. gracenotes profile image93
    gracenotesposted 6 years ago

    Most of the time, I'm able to suppress my Texas accent.  It's there at some low level.

    When I took voice lessons, my excellent teacher commented on my speaking voice when she heard me for the first time.  She said, "I would never have guessed you are a Texan.  You use your face like a Northerner.  Northerners are very concerned about pronouncing everything correctly, and they chew on their words." She went on to say that she was from Pennsylvania.

    Hee.  I think one way to diminish a regional accent is to take voice, because you're going to have to work on "pure vowels."  And perhaps sing in other languages like Italian.

  34. Beth100 profile image82
    Beth100posted 6 years ago

    Depends where I am.  I'm a Canadian with a slight British accent and thrown in there is my Texan drawl.  Alas, I haven't shaken off the y'all thingy yet....

    1. Stevennix2001 profile image82
      Stevennix2001posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      i bet you must have a very sexy accent though.  wink

  35. CASE1WORKER profile image85
    CASE1WORKERposted 6 years ago

    i wish i had better speecch- HRH the queen is my role model my aspiration, which I do not reach! the way she enunciates each syllable is superb

    our vicar is from somewhere in the deepest part of the south of the USA- if the service is flagging he will say "i've been in the UK for 25 years and you can hardly notice my accent" this usually results in us falling on the floor !

  36. Beth100 profile image82
    Beth100posted 6 years ago

    lol  For some, yes.  Especially when I speak French -- all my accents come out in full force and no one can understand me.  lol  lol

    How are you Steven?

    1. Stevennix2001 profile image82
      Stevennix2001posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      great thanks.  how about you?

  37. Polly C profile image87
    Polly Cposted 6 years ago

    I live in Norfolk in England where the true, local accent is really awful.  Actually I do come from Suffolk but the accent is pretty much the same. Thankfully I don't have that accent, and not many people I know have it as mostly they have all moved here from other places...or learned to speak properly!!

    Weirdly, on several occasions I have been mistaken as somebody from Australia, a place I have never actually been. I really don't think I sound like an Australian, but it has probably happened to me at least ten times.

    1. camlo profile image83
      camloposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I was in that area once, on the coast - Aldeborough? Wrong spelling, but sounds something like that.

      Well, I loved the accent. The people sound like true 'country folk'.

      1. Polly C profile image87
        Polly Cposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Did you? That's good to hear, most people laugh about it!! Mind you, Aldeburgh is a rather upmarket place, so you were probably listening to posh country folk! It costs a fair bit to live there compared with other parts of the county.

        1. Polly C profile image87
          Polly Cposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Johnny Depp has a house in nearby Thorpeness

          1. camlo profile image83
            camloposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            I can understand why - it's a beautiful town.

  38. Beth100 profile image82
    Beth100posted 6 years ago

    I'm sick...dragged myself into work for 6:30 this morning but think I'm going to stay in tomorrow.  Glad you're well. smile

    1. Stevennix2001 profile image82
      Stevennix2001posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      thanks beth. im sorry to hear your sick though.  i know how you feel, as i wasn't feeling too well either a few weeks ago.  however, im a lot better now.  anyways, it's nothing serious is it?  if so, i hope you feel better soon.

  39. bojanglesk8 profile image60
    bojanglesk8posted 6 years ago

    No.

  40. themist profile image60
    themistposted 6 years ago

    I'm from London mate. Naa, no problem mate, I think I say mate a lot in real life though. I don't really have an accent usually but when I go back to university after spending time with my London mates, I sound " a lot more cockney" apparently. Haha.

  41. Stevennix2001 profile image82
    Stevennix2001posted 6 years ago

    to answer the original forum post, no i don't have an accent that i know of.  although i do have a tendency to say ya'all sometimes.  however, that's about it.

    1. Beth100 profile image82
      Beth100posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Ya have an accent -- that funny Texan drawl!!!  ha ha ha lol xox

      1. Stevennix2001 profile image82
        Stevennix2001posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        gee thanks beth.  roll

  42. profile image59
    L4Blueposted 6 years ago

    As a scouser, yeah a bit. Outside of Liverpool it can be hit and miss what people make of me.

    For any non-Brits, we're one of the regions in the UK that tends to get made fun of the most. Although to be honest, similar to any country I suppose, every region here has its own stereotypes/accent 'haters'.

  43. donotfear profile image89
    donotfearposted 6 years ago

    I have a strong Southern accent, unique to this area. When I visit other parts of the U.S. , I do my best to drop it & speak more distinctly so others can understand me. What bothers me is when someone laughs at it. It's been a while, but I had somebody actually laugh at me in jest.  It's part of my unique culture which will always be with me, but I also want to speak distinctly where people can understand me.

    By yall'!  From extreme NE Texas/ SW Arkansas.

    1. gracenotes profile image93
      gracenotesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      @Donotfear,

      I saw one of your videos posted on your hub.  Without even looking at your profile, but hearing you talk, I said to myself, "That is an East Texas girl."

      Hey, I pegged it accurately!

 
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