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Help--Duplicate Story Content

  1. Marcus Teague profile image60
    Marcus Teagueposted 6 years ago

    [Note: my mood is confused, not angry.]

    I found the word "duplicate" in bold red letters under one of my hubs a few days ago. I asked what it meant, then I asked if it could be removed. When I was told it affects me making money I wanted the status of the hub removed. I was then told such a thing could not/would not be done.

    It makes some sense if an identical article were published in multiple newspapers or magazines. Owners/editors would prefer unique content information so that competition buys their magazine over others.


    The problem is that the hub in question isn't an article, but a story; the hub itself is a product [of entertainment]; a completely different animal. For example, in the publishing world, bookstores don't penalize you for selling your book to their competitors, and neither do magazines.

    It's probably because my POV isn't on the right side.
    Can someone explain this to me?


    Now that I think about it, if the story is a product of entertainment, would that somehow technically violate the rules on advertising/product promotion?

  2. profile image0
    Website Examinerposted 6 years ago

    Duplicate means that your article has been found elsewhere on the Internet - it does not matter what type of article it is. To get the flag removed, you should be sure that the HubPages article is unique:

    http://hubpages.com/faq/#duplicate_content

    The rules concerning "overly promotional" is another issue to consider, but is apparently not the problem here:

    http://hubpages.com/faq/#overly_promotional

    1. Marcus Teague profile image60
      Marcus Teagueposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Well like I said, it's not an article, it's a story, and of course it exists elsewhere on the Internet, I've posted it elsewhere.

      Completely different from an article, a story is in itself a product [of entertainment], like a toy or merchandise.

      1. profile image0
        Website Examinerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Call it a story, an article, makes no difference as far as the rules concerning duplicate content are concerned. If you read the FAQs and interpret them correctly, you will see that such a distinction is irrelevant.

        1. Marcus Teague profile image60
          Marcus Teagueposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Uninvited Writer explained it nicely now. The problem wasn't the rules but the POV of them, and because of that the first time around no I didn't interpret them correctly.

          I was under the impression that Hubpages is a seller of my merchandise from which we both make money on. Why they would punish a creator's  merchandise sales when it is sold elsewhere?

          The answer is they wouldn't because that's not what they are.

          1. profile image0
            Website Examinerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Thanks for explaining.

  3. Uninvited Writer profile image82
    Uninvited Writerposted 6 years ago

    But publishers do mind if you publish your works in more than one place. They usually demand exclusivity.

    1. Marcus Teague profile image60
      Marcus Teagueposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Ok, I think that helps me out. It's hard to visualize, but if I look at Hubpages as a publisher and not a bookstore, then I see things differently.

      Alright, now that I know that, there are several locations the story is posted. One I've completely forgotten altogether and can't find. Three or four short story competitions. And one site that doesn't use tags very well. HubPages puts the story (with the title) in the first page on Google, the others can't really be found.

 
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