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Question for Ex-pat's residing overseas

  1. Kangaroo_Jase profile image83
    Kangaroo_Jaseposted 6 years ago

    After some recent contact with a cousin living in England for the last 15 years who thinks I would love it over there, prompts me a question to ask.

    Are you living in a country not of your birth and have moved there because of finding love, better job prospects, visited the country on holidays and fell in love with the place, etc, what was your reason?

    1. profile image0
      china manposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      yes.
      bored shi+less with the same old same old.
      tired of difficult relationships with fractured females

      Now, can't leave because of finding the opposite of all the above.

    2. thisisoli profile image55
      thisisoliposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      i recently moved to Austin Texas from York, England.  I really enjoy it over here, and there are definitely more prospects in my field.  Unfortunately the Pubs are just not the same sad (and I can't find decent fish & chips anywhere).

      1. Kangaroo_Jase profile image83
        Kangaroo_Jaseposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I've often thought about that Oli, would a true fish and chip shop do well for ex pat English, Australian, New Zealanders in say California?

        1. travelespresso profile image82
          travelespressoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Or Vietnam!  lol

        2. thisisoli profile image55
          thisisoliposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Maybe, You can get 'fish and chips' over here, but they are restaurant style 'gormet'. I want thick slices of potato drenched in grease!

    3. ceciliabeltran profile image83
      ceciliabeltranposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      The trend is global now. Why hire somebody you have to train when you can just import somebody who already knows how its done. Also, some people are just better suited in another country. Their soul's home...so to speak.

    4. shazwellyn profile image84
      shazwellynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Who is your cousin kidding? lol

      1. Kangaroo_Jase profile image83
        Kangaroo_Jaseposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        lol, she visited twice in her youth and ended up meeting someone and emigrating there, if it wasn't for the accent most folk would think she is English.

  2. IzzyM profile image88
    IzzyMposted 6 years ago

    I visited this place on holiday and fell in love with it. Love the lazy laid back way of life, and the cafe bars that welcomed smokers.

    Now they have changed the law and I want to leave, but need to find a country where smokers are welcome.

    By the way its only been 4 days since the ban was introduced and well over 1000 people have been denounced already!

    1. profile image0
      china manposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Welcome to China Izzy !!  although they banned smoking in restaurants it will not extend to the mindless levels it has in the UK, Chinese much too sensible for that.  And, in the cities, nobody smokes in confined spaces as it offends others in that situation, you know, civilized behaviour that does not require legislation.

      1. IzzyM profile image88
        IzzyMposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Do they have pubs in China? If so, how can they avoid smoking if there are a few in? They go outside?

        1. profile image0
          china manposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          No ban in pubs !!!   and people who go to them expect to find other people smoking there - or take a private room which is always available.  Mostly of course we sit outside anyway, it is one of the joys of Chinese life - eating and drinking outside.

        2. kirstenblog profile image79
          kirstenblogposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          It might be Japan that I am thinking of but either way, they actually have signs with children with burnt eyes and faces saying that that is the average height a smoker holds their ciggys! The idea being that everything is so crowded that by smoking you risk burning children! It seems extreme to me but whatever.

  3. IzzyM profile image88
    IzzyMposted 6 years ago

    I loved what you said about people having respect for each other and not smoking so as not to annoy in company.
    Tell us more about China and Chinese culture, or have you written a hub on it?

    1. profile image0
      china manposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Of course I have hubs on it - pretty much all my hubs are about what I see and experience here, help yourself smile

  4. travelespresso profile image82
    travelespressoposted 6 years ago

    I'm living in Vietnam at the moment.  One of the many things that has amazed me is the extremely supportive, caring culture in the workplace.  I've never worked anywhere quite like it. 

    There doesn't appear to be any back stabbing.  I'm learning a lot about a different way to do business.  It's nice.

    1. travelespresso profile image82
      travelespressoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Huh!  Forgot your question!  I moved here because of the opportunity to live and work overseas.  I don't see it as anything other than a bit of an adventure.

      1. profile image0
        china manposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Hiya travelespresso  -  where are you in Vietnam ?  we are now in the south of China and going to escape the cold snap to the coast at Beihai in a couple of weeks.  They tell me there is a boat across to Hanoi just across the water, and a cheap fast train from here to Hanoi also.  Might just pop down and have a look around.

        1. travelespresso profile image82
          travelespressoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Hello China Man
          I was just north of Hanoi in HaiPhong in the middle of last year.  I've been to Hanoi many times and I LOVE it there.  I've written a couple of hubs about the Old Quarter if you are interested and decide to go there.  It's truly amazing.

          I escaped the north, chasing warmth and I'm now in a town near Saigon (Ho Chi Minh City). 

          I recommend Hanoi to travelers and, if you've time, take a trip up to Sapa to see how the colorfully dressed tribes live.  Its an experience.

          It should be getting a bit warmer up there in a few weeks.  Are you going around Chinese New Year?   I'm going to Laos during that time!

          1. profile image0
            china manposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            If we go it will be in around a weeks time.  Still juggling with go travel - buy a laptop - go travel - buy a laptop !  Either way we will get a week or so in the warm end of China even if we don't get across the water. Have a good time in Laos.

  5. kirstenblog profile image79
    kirstenblogposted 6 years ago

    Me, I moved to the UK for love. We may move yet again for a better economy (haha, like that exists!)

  6. Misha profile image75
    Mishaposted 6 years ago

    It is so much warmer here. I got a good job offer, and thought I'd give it a try. But now I am seriously thinking about even warmer pastures. smile

    1. Sufidreamer profile image81
      Sufidreamerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      See you in sunny Greece, then big_smile

      We had many reasons for moving here - escaping the stress, the history, the culture, the lower cost of living, the beautiful Greek mountains - just some of the reasons.

      Neither of us felt much loyalty or patriotism to England, so it was an easy choice smile

      1. shazwellyn profile image84
        shazwellynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Well, you wont see me much in England in a couple of years.  Im off - will just rape the business opportunities here, to provide a lifestyle and come back to when I am old and in need of the NHS.  The UK has very little to offer me to stay - most of all the blooming weather!

        First stop for me will be 6 months in New York in the summertime, then I am aroaming! smile

        1. Kangaroo_Jase profile image83
          Kangaroo_Jaseposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Yup,

          Thats what I told my cousin, there would be many aspects of the UK I'd like, especially the people, but, its too bloody cold!!!!

        2. wavegirl22 profile image47
          wavegirl22posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          did I read correctly . . New York . . .???

          smile

        3. Misha profile image75
          Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Wow! Good luck Sharon, and lotsa fun! smile

      2. Misha profile image75
        Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Not exactly Greece, but Cyprus seems to be the best destination for us at the moment, all things considered smile

  7. MarieOaks profile image61
    MarieOaksposted 6 years ago

    I'm an ex-pat living in Mexico. I've been here 3.5 years - and continue loving it! It just isn't the same when I visit the States...

  8. Sue Adams profile image93
    Sue Adamsposted 6 years ago

    From a perpetual foreigner:

    I was born in Hungary
    Primary school in France
    Secondary school Holland
    Higher education London
    Worked in Holland, Belgium, Italy, Germany, England, France, Portugal, the US, Japan.
    Currently living in Spain.
    I speak 5 languages fluently.

    Conclusions:
    1. I can't imagine an entire lifetime in one single country, let alone in a single town! How terribly boring that must be.
    2. Living in a new country is the best education (irreplaceable)
    3. The last country is always the best
    4. A good mild, sunny climate makes life so much easier and   happier.
    5. Tourism is a poor substitute for the real taste of a new country, you have to live and work there and learn the language and integrate. smile

    Downside if you can call it that:
    No roots, no sense of patriotism (which I think is a good thing)
    If anything I consider myself to be a "European".

    1. profile image0
      Home Girlposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I was born in Latvia under USSR flag. I am in Canada since 1992. Too long. I am Canadian citizen, but I still feel like a Martian. I want to go somewhere but have some "chains" on my legs. And  even if I were free, I have no idea where. Mars?


      http://s1.hubimg.com/u/4385736_f248.jpg

  9. steffer profile image57
    stefferposted 6 years ago

    I still live in Belgium, but i want to move to the US.
    This is a very nice country to live in, but i don't really feel home here.Don't know why, but am longing to the States, since i was 12 years old.

    How difficult, or easy was it to move, to get your citizenship, and all the rest?

    I was thinking, since i have been a head chef, for more then a decade, it shouldn't be so hard to find a job overseas, but i rather do something else,

  10. vaguesan profile image80
    vaguesanposted 6 years ago

    I'm from the States originally but now live in Japan. I studied Japanese in high school and college and did a 1 year exchange at a university in Kyoto. Now that I've finished college in the states I'm back and living it up in Osaka. Recently got married to a local too so doubt I'll be heading back to the US any time soon.

  11. Bard of Ely profile image86
    Bard of Elyposted 6 years ago

    Yes, I am from Wales in the UK but have been living in Tenerife for the last six years and want to stay here. For me it was the countryside and wildlife as well as the better weather.

 
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