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Bronze Age swords

  1. Constant Walker profile image59
    Constant Walkerposted 8 years ago

    I'm looking for a source of verification that Bronze Age bronze swords were cast in stone.  I know it would seem obvious that they would have been (they didn't have a wide choice of materials), but I want to be able to verify it before I add such info to my hub, "The Sword."

    Thanks

    PS:  For the same hub, does anyone know what the first comics-to-cinema movie was?

  2. darkside profile image79
    darksideposted 8 years ago

    The "lost wax" technique was invented back in the second millennium BC. I've had a quick look up in one of my encyclopaedia's. Which surprised the hell out of me, I've seen the lost wax technique done in a modern casting facility at a place I worked once (a weapons engineering facility) and I didn't realise that it was being done so far back.

    I'll type up the paragraph I've just read along with the reference details for you, I just need to head out and do something right now.

  3. Constant Walker profile image59
    Constant Walkerposted 8 years ago

    Thank you very much, Darkside.  I'll research it in the morning.  Cool!!

  4. darkside profile image79
    darksideposted 8 years ago

    Here's a couple of paragraphs from the reference book I used. I think you should look up more info on open-mold casting, close-mold casting and lost-wax technique.




    When I saw the process of lost wax casting they had machined molds into which they injected the wax, then when it set they separated the molds and took the wax components out (I assume that 3000 years ago they didn't do that bit but perhaps carved or formed the wax into the shape they wanted) then reusing the mold again and again.

    The wax components were then put on a 'tree'. So imagine a wax cylinder of sorts with these other wax parts joined onto it. Then the whole thing is dipped into a 'slurry'. And then in some powdery substance. And left to dry. They did this a few times. Which was interesting to watch, as a robotic arm did all the work.

    Once that's done they fire these 'shells' (don't quote me on the terminology here, I didn't have that much to do with this part of the facility) and it hardens the stuff that it's been dipped in, and the wax pretty much burns away completely (hence the term 'lost wax').

    Then they fill these shells in with the molten metal. Once its cooled down they chip off the ceramic shell like coating and then grind the ends that once joined to the branches.

    They used it for all sorts of items. The most interesting was for the links between the handcuffs. They were cast linked together. So there was no joins in the links itself.

    Anyway, hope you can use the info that I typed up!

  5. Constant Walker profile image59
    Constant Walkerposted 8 years ago

    Wow, Darkside.  Fascinating research.  I'm going to check into "Lost Wax" to see if it was also used to cast bronze swords.
       Thanks again, I appreciate all the trouble you went to.

  6. CarpetDiem profile image78
    CarpetDiemposted 8 years ago

    Hi Constant, This is an interesting question, and an interesting break from the typical hubpages forum question. I googled "were Bronze Age bronze swords cast in stone?" and came up with this website and webpage (http://www.bronze-age-craft.com/swordcasting.htm) which also has some great pictures. Had you seen it yet? I look forward to seeing your hub. ~ Steve

  7. CarpetDiem profile image78
    CarpetDiemposted 8 years ago

    Hi Constant, I just clicked through to your profile and see that you've already published "The Sword". I gave it a "thumbs up" for the pictures and headings alone, and have bookmarked it to read when I have time. It looks very good (and extensive!).

  8. Constant Walker profile image59
    Constant Walkerposted 8 years ago

    Ya, CarpetDiem (love that name!) the question came after the hub was already published.  Thanks for the compliment.  I look forward to hearing what you think of it.

 
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