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Help for Japan Earthquake / Tsunami Survivors

  1. barryrutherford profile image35
    barryrutherfordposted 6 years ago

    I know many Hubbers continue to be shocked at the massive level Nine (9) Earthquake that has befell Japan with the accompanying Apocalyptic Tsunami that followed.  I know you want to help with a few dollars.  I have put a link on my profile page to the right place.

  2. barryrutherford profile image35
    barryrutherfordposted 6 years ago

    This is a news blog link from Australia covering the tragedy

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/events/japan … 2eb10d970b

  3. Misha profile image73
    Mishaposted 6 years ago

    Thanks Barry, but this still looks too big of an organization, with the likelihood of most of the money being lost inside it. Does anybody know how to reach local communities directly?

  4. Eaglekiwi profile image74
    Eaglekiwiposted 6 years ago

    Red Cross seems reputable enough smile

    1. Misha profile image73
      Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      They do have paid staff, and lots of it, don't they?

      1. Eaglekiwi profile image74
        Eaglekiwiposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        They never paid me lol

        No  you are correct,they do have some paid  staff,not sure of proportion.


        Another thought : Japanese Embassy?

        http://www.us.emb-japan.go.jp/english/html/index.html

        1. Misha profile image73
          Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          They link to red cross only...

  5. barryrutherford profile image35
    barryrutherfordposted 6 years ago

    Misha

    There are other sites online you can go.  Here in Australia we have a Red Cross site.  I looked for one that I thought Americans would trust but there are plenty of others.  I would think this  charity is fully  audited and quite transparent with their activiites...

  6. barryrutherford profile image35
    barryrutherfordposted 6 years ago

    Yes I have found another one I think I will change my link to this

    http://www.google.co.jp/intl/en/crisisr … e2011.html

    1. Misha profile image73
      Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks Barry, it's again red cross, though Japanese one. I took a look at their finance statement, and I am not very happy with what I saw...

      1. barryrutherford profile image35
        barryrutherfordposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        What did you see ?  smile

        1. Misha profile image73
          Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          No transparency about the part of budget that is spent on organization itself. Judging by very imprecise titles of what money are spent on, this is likely around 30% at least.

          1. profile image0
            ryankettposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Here's a list of 10 charities seeking donations, you may find one here? http://exchange.causes.com/2011/03/trag … your-help/

            1. Misha profile image73
              Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Yeah, and some of them even putting adwords ads for that. Just google "japan tsunami donation". How do you think, where money for these ads come from?

              1. profile image0
                ryankettposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                I didn't say that they would help, I said that you may find one, I wasn't going to research each of those organisations smile

                Save The Children give 90% of their money directly to programs, 10% on administration costs. There are always going to be administration costs, as they have to pay rent and bills like any other organisation smile There are also logistics. Oxfam only spent 80%, so they spend far more.

                Charitywatch.org rates charities on this, http://www.charitywatch.org/toprated.html

                In the International Relief & Development Category only four charities are given the highest grade (A+):

                CARE
                Africare
                International Rescue Committee
                Partners In Health

                So, I guess that if anybody wants to donate then I suggest that they visit the International Rescue Committee donation page: https://www.rescue.org/donate/emergency

                They are currently on standby in Japan. They claim 4% spent on fundraising (and one would assume that this includes their website) and 6% on Administration (which one would assume includes their overheads). So 90% is a decent amount.

                1. Misha profile image73
                  Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Thanks Ryan, this is quite a comprehensive research smile

  7. Eaglekiwi profile image74
    Eaglekiwiposted 6 years ago

    I goggled missionaries in Japan ,because I know the church I go to sponsers a couple there and wondered all and what they were all doing with the money.
    Of course they have been there for 12mths ,working in a hospital so Im assuming the extra donations will get to the right place.



    http://www.japanmission.org/

    Theres also Salvation Army

  8. barryrutherford profile image35
    barryrutherfordposted 6 years ago

    The Red Cross here in Australlia do excellent work.  They need paid staff in order to do a professional job.  I donate money to them & have given blood to them for 35 years

    1. Eaglekiwi profile image74
      Eaglekiwiposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Yea must admit Im only familiar with the NZ Redcross,but you do need to check how/where donated money is going too.

      Bugger when greed messes up charity,I reckon.

  9. barryrutherford profile image35
    barryrutherfordposted 6 years ago

    80% per cent of something is better than 100% of nothing


    unless we hand deliver the money this is the best way to help.  And right now Japan needs all the help it can get.  Failure to get Japan back on track will affect us all in future...

    Misha
    you can choose not to donate & thats fine but i feel compelled to encourage myself and others to give something

    1. profile image0
      ryankettposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      80% is better than nothing, but it is not better than 90%.

      If one charity is managing to spend 10% on administration and fundraising, whilst the other spends 20%, I would much rather donate to the former.

      1. PrettyPanther profile image84
        PrettyPantherposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I understand the desire to give to organizations that keep the administrative costs as low as possible, and agree with the basic idea.  But let's not forget that some organizations such as the Red Cross provide worldwide assistance and go places to provide services that smaller organizations cannot.  When you think of it that way, then a 30% overhead is not unreasonable.

        It is great that we have so many choices for giving.

        1. profile image0
          ryankettposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I actually never mentioned the Red Cross.

          Although you should note that the percentages I am quoting relate to administration and fundraising only.  All costs related to projects are counted in the 80%, 90% or whatever percent. So location of aid is irrelevant, each of the four charities that I listed as well as my two examples deal with things on a global level.

          Therefore the 20% that Oxfam spends goes primarily on running offices, paying directors and managers, advertising spending and commission for paid fundraisers (those people with clipboards, they get well paid).

          There are charities with numerous directors on six figure salaries. I'm not suggesting that the Red Cross are one, although they may be, but there have been a few revelations in the UK which have resulted in me being very careful where my donations go.

          I would hate to see people getting fat on the back of my donations, and the disclosure of statistics like that helps me to make my choice.

  10. barryrutherford profile image35
    barryrutherfordposted 6 years ago

    Thanks for your comments we had the recent Queensland Premier's Disaster Flood Relief Appeal here in Queensland

    Every dollar donated is going to victims.  The Fund will be admininstered by public servants  but I guess the reality is the costs in administering that fund to taxpayers will be 30%

  11. Aficionada profile image90
    Aficionadaposted 6 years ago

    A good place to check on organizations:

    http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.c … ;cpid=1221

    This has tips on responsible giving and a list of recommended/ rated charities that are currently receiving donations specifically for Japan.  (The home page has links to lists for other crises or catastrophes.)

    Another evaluator:

    http://www.bbb.org/charity-reviews/publ … eauID=9999

    http://www.bbb.org/us/article/tips-for- … apan-25992

    Finally, a lot of different churches have their own relief organizations; I'm pretty sure that many of them are evaluated and can be checked on these sites (and also on Charitywatch.org).

    A lot of Christian denominations participate in "One Great Hour of Sharing" - http://onegreathourofsharing.org/index.html - which is an annual drive to raise funds that can be available immediately when a crisis occurs.  In other words, the donations that were given last year were available to help in Haiti, then in New Zealand, and now in Japan.  The advantage of that conduit is that resources are available at once, without having to be solicited.  But then the coffers have to be replenished.  Another advantage is that the various denominations often have workers on the ground in the location where the catastrophe occurred, and they are able to begin immediately to distribute relief through them. (Like what Eaglekiwi said.)

 
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