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Copywriting

  1. Pamela Sarzana profile image60
    Pamela Sarzanaposted 6 years ago

    If copy writing is the only way to keep your content from  getting stolen or "plagiarized". Then how do you go about copy writing it? Is it complicated?

    1. SunSeven profile image64
      SunSevenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      You can use http://myfreecopyright.com/
      I am not sure whether it will be valid in court cases.
      I use it anyway.

      Best Regards

  2. knolyourself profile image60
    knolyourselfposted 6 years ago

    A simple form. Can probably do it on line.

  3. Peter Owen profile image60
    Peter Owenposted 6 years ago

    Actually, I think they will steal it anyway and you would have to sue them. All they have to do is change a bunch of words.

    1. profile image0
      Website Examinerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      On the internet, filing a DMCA complaint is the weapon of choice. Google can see which material was posted on the Internet first. But with plagiarism, where words are rewritten, I agree this may be hard to prove outside of a court of law. To sue for copyright infringement in US courts, registration is required prior to filing the lawsuit.

  4. profile image0
    Website Examinerposted 6 years ago

    I think you mean "copyrighting." Under international law, copyright is automatic from the time that the work is fixed onto a tangible medium like paper, a computer file, or a web page. You can register your work, there are both paid and free services for it, including myfreecopyright.com. But legally, there is no requirement to do so.

  5. knolyourself profile image60
    knolyourselfposted 6 years ago

    The copyright laws 80 years and as long as there is any living relative - whatever - all for the corporations to control content forever.

  6. psycheskinner profile image80
    psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago

    Registering copyright costs money. It is necessary only if you live in the United states and anticipate wanting to sue infringers for monetary damages.

    1. Julie2 profile image59
      Julie2posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      You are so right, it is very expensive. I wanted to copyright some tee shirt designs that I created and it is insane.

      1. profile image0
        Website Examinerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Wouldn't that be trademark protection? That is more complicated and costly compared with copyright registration; a mere formality.

        1. Julie2 profile image59
          Julie2posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I want to learn how to copyright as well. I have to buy alot of books for Dummies! LOL

  7. profile image0
    kimberlyslyricsposted 6 years ago

    As ridiculous as this sounds at least here in Canada is considered legal and valid form of copyright.  I use it all the time, especially before I was published in print.

    I fed ex my piece[s] to myself and leave unopened, almost like a time capsule but holds true as to date content was created and for minimal cost.  Clearly only really effective if one is going to court

    hmm:

    1. recommend1 profile image66
      recommend1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      This is what I used to do with things I invented - when I was in business and the inventions, or unique modifications, could be worth a lot of money.

      The problem is as you say, it is only useful in court, and copyright of the kind of materials in hubs would never get to court unless there was some kind of overall site protection arrangement where it was done on bubbers behalf, and even then to prove that the original material in a spun or re-written article started out as yours would be almost impossible.

    2. Pamela Sarzana profile image60
      Pamela Sarzanaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I have heard people talk about mailing designs for "inventions" to them selves. Postmarked, kept unopened ,in case of a court dispute. Is this the poorman's "copyright? "

      1. Julie2 profile image59
        Julie2posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Yes it is. I have done this for my writing but what about pictures?

  8. psycheskinner profile image80
    psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago

    Mail stamping a.k.a. the 'poor mans copyright' has never stood up in court as a proof of authorship. Mainly because it is easy to fake.  You can fedex an unsealed envelope to yourself and put what you want in it at a later date.

    1. recommend1 profile image66
      recommend1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      No you can't, well not in the UK you can't anyway. The envelope must be sealed or Fedex or any other legitimate carrier will not take it.  In my case I had them tape it with their own marked tape - however, if I had thought that any of my stuff was seriously worth a load of money I would have mailed it directly to my bank, accountant or lawyer.

      1. profile image0
        kimberlyslyricsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        big_smile

      2. psycheskinner profile image80
        psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        That is one hypothetical.  You could probably steam it open and reseal it. Or something else....

        In any case this method has never been used successfully in court.

    2. Pamela Sarzana profile image60
      Pamela Sarzanaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Wouldn't the envelope have to have a postmark on it?....I guess a person wouldn't  want to bet the farm on that.

      1. Uninvited Writer profile image81
        Uninvited Writerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        No,no, no. Poor man's copyright does not work. I wrote a hub on it.

        There is nothing to stop someone from mailing an empty unsealed envelope to themselves and then adding something after. And it does not stand up in court.

        It is the same in Canada as the US since we are both under the Berne convention.

        1. profile image0
          Website Examinerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          This dangerous myth is so hard to knock down.

        2. Julie2 profile image59
          Julie2posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Can you add the link to your hub UW? I am really interested in reading it.

  9. psycheskinner profile image80
    psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago

    You can copyright artwork in the same way as text.

    In both cases you can reduce costs by doing it by a collection/anthology rather than piece by piece.

    Personally,I don't bother. I would only really want to sue to make an infringer stop--not to extract damages.

  10. PaulGoodman67 profile image90
    PaulGoodman67posted 6 years ago

    As has been explained by some of the previous commenters, copyright automatically happens when you write anything new, certainly in the UK, and I believe for most places.  The difficulty can be proving it, as other people have posted.  Proof of the date something appeared on the internet can be actually easier to prove than with traditional writing/typing, I believe.

    With article writing (non-fiction), someone can generally reword something like Peter says and it doesn't breach copyright.  Newspapers give the same story over and over, for instance in different words.  With inventions and fiction it can get much more complicated as it is often the "ideas" behind the words etc. that are being copyrighted.

    You also have to take into account issues such as money made and value.  If someone stole something off you and they make 50 cents/month off it, then you may sue them and win all that money back, but you have to question whether it is worth your while?

    Generally with internet copyright breaches, contacting the copier directly, contacting the website where the copying appears, and DMCAs are the best way forward, methinks.

    1. profile image0
      Website Examinerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Inventions can be patented. "Ideas" for a literary work cannot be copyrighted. It requires something more tangible. Once ideas are implemented into a specific storyline, developed characters, a detailed plot etc., protection can kick in.

      Informative post, otherwise.

  11. thisisoli profile image56
    thisisoliposted 6 years ago

    There is a lot of misinformation here, but here is the short version.

    Anything you publish online is automatically protected under your copyright.

    You don't need to put up a copyright message, you don't need to pay to have it copyrighted. It is yours.

    Proving that you are the original owner is a different matter. But most website owners/hosts can easily tell if someone is infringing on copyright simply from taking a look at their overall activity.

    1. Daniel Carter profile image90
      Daniel Carterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Oli and WE are correct.
      Proof is the issue, and there are usually several different ways to prove creation and ownership. Mailing something to yourself in the 21st century won't hold up in court, in almost every country. Technology and information have advanced, rendering this concept to a myth. If protecting your intellectual property really does go to court, your attorney should have experience, recommendations and ideas on how to prove creation and ownership.

      I've composed over 1000 pieces of music of my own, and only two of them have I officially copyrighted because creation and proof of ownership are pretty clear in all cases. I have had other arrangers/composers use some of my music illegally in many different ways. They don't have a leg to stand on in every case. Cease and desist orders are pretty threatening if you really have to use them, especially when you know you have clear proof.

      If you're serious about learning more about American copyright law and how to copyright your intellectual property, start here:

      http://www.copyright.gov/forms/

  12. thisisoli profile image56
    thisisoliposted 6 years ago

    If you are creating posts in wordpress and you do not perform regular database maintenance you actually have  a pretty good paper trail in the form of 'post revisions'.

  13. Julie2 profile image59
    Julie2posted 6 years ago

    What can be done when it comes to pictures? Quick story:

    I wrote an article on American Idols Top 12 Guys. This person copied a bunch of the pics and used them to advertise a concert they were promoting with 10+ idols that did not make it.

    When I saw this it bothered the hell out of me because he made flyers, a billboard was placed by the highway, he placed it on his site advertised it on FB and everything, my pic was used for all of this. Not one shout out to me, this Photo was taken by, pic by, nothing.

    What could I have done in this situation?

    1. White Teeth profile image59
      White Teethposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      You can send a “cease and desist” letter. 

      Without a prior registration your options are more limited. A registration prior to infringement enables you to collect statutory damages and legal fees(up to $30K and up to $150K for "willfull" infringement.) Without prior registration, you are more limited to actual monetary damages to yourself (which would be small and hard to prove).

      You could file an application to register the article and accompanying photos (about $30), and try to bluff the guy that the registration had been initiated prior to the infringement. Tell him that registration is pending, but you would drop the whole matter for $500 or something like that…

      1. Julie2 profile image59
        Julie2posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        How would I be able to register them? If you don't mind me asking.

    2. thisisoli profile image56
      thisisoliposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Just to make sure, did you personally take the photos?

      1. Julie2 profile image59
        Julie2posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I took them while watching the show

        1. White Teeth profile image59
          White Teethposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Hmmm…does “while watching the show” mean you were in the studio audience?...or...

          (I thought you were originally talking about paparazzi type pictures…)

          1. Julie2 profile image59
            Julie2posted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Hey White Teeth, boy oh boy I wish I was at the show! Would that have made a difference? I'm not being sarcastic, I'm asking because I really don't know.

            1. Uninvited Writer profile image81
              Uninvited Writerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              I don't know how copyright treats pictures taken off the television, I would say it's not really allowed.

              1. Julie2 profile image59
                Julie2posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Guess I'll have to do some more research on that one then.

            2. White Teeth profile image59
              White Teethposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              It might make a difference if you were in attendance; I don’t know that much about it or what ticket-holders agree to.

              If, however, you are speaking of taking pictures of the show off of the TV set, then posting these online, then you would really not have any rights to these pictures. The network or producers would probably own the copyrights.

              If someone else used the same pictures commercially they would probably be infringing on the copyright holders but not on you.

              It is possible that the copyrighter holders would feel that you are in violation as well. It would depend on the interpretation of fair use. If you were critiquing or reviewing the show along with these pictures you might have a better claim to fair use.

              1. Julie2 profile image59
                Julie2posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Makes alot of sense White Teeth. Thanks smile

                Now lets get off of me and back to Pamela Sarzana's question...lol

 
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