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Dr. Jack Kevorkian has died.

  1. lorlie6 profile image84
    lorlie6posted 5 years ago

    Dr. Kevorkian, infamous for his assisted "Suicide Machine," died Friday after a brief illness. He was 83 years old.  "Doctor Death" was a zealous supporter of assisted suicide and came to the public's attention as it became known that Kevorkian had helped at least 130 terminally ill people end their lives.

    What's your view on this topic?  Do you remember the polarized press?  I certainly do!  I'm still not sure what I think about it all.

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      Baileybearposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I've always been for euthanasia for any of my dying pets that were suffering.  I can see how much of a hornet's nest it is with humans though - mainly because it would be abused - people knocking off others that don't want to be because they want their money etc

      1. lorlie6 profile image84
        lorlie6posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Hey, BB-I KNOW!  And that's only the tip of the iceberg.  Would doctors have to assist suicide when their oath is to 'do no harm?'

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          Baileybearposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I read an article recently about the way many doctors self-medicate & become drug addicts & are at higher risk of suicide than general population.  One doctor even said they had to finish people off that were on their way out & taking up bed space.  Did a student doctor's head in & he became a drug addict (on stolen meds he had access to).  Personally, I wouldn't feel comfortable ending someones life, but if they were suffering terribly & terminal, I think it could be the compassionate thing to have the option if they wanted it

          1. earnestshub profile image87
            earnestshubposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            I agree BB it is a dicey road alright, but if the suffering is unbearable.....

            I have been living with chronic pain for over 30 years, 24/7 never stops. I go to sleep doing spine stretches to reduce it enough to get to sleep and need to do them again in the morning before I can get out of bed.
            Most people don't even know my problem when they meet me, I am expert at hiding it.


            Not everyone has the same luck or money I had to afford expensive treatment and deep tissue massage daily to get back to walking and "normal" life again.

            I tackles it at a mind level as well, and put myself in the Mendelssohn pain clinic for 2 years, learned meditation, and Feldenkrais exercises, which I do religiously every day. 

            One day it is all going to be too much, and at that time, I will probably be looking for a doctor death. smile

            1. lorlie6 profile image84
              lorlie6posted 5 years ago in reply to this

              I really hope that time never comes, earnesthub!  But I feel the same way about euthanasia. I am not suffering from chronic and endless pain-at least in the strict sense of the word. 
              Two years ago I had a Total Hip Replacement for my left, very  painful leg.  I'd had the pain for years, but as I have grown older, it became worse-obviously.  It was a horrific surgical recovery, but the result is almost miraculous.
              So I am having the right one 'done' within the next month or two-I'm just waiting for the surgery scheduler to phone.  I'm on pins and needles waiting, but I know it's worth it.  Or maybe not...smile  J/K!
              I am very blessed/lucky to have good health insurance-couldn't do it without Blue Cross!
              So although I've had pain for much of my life, I finally got an accurate diagnosis and I knew the surgery would solve my pain.  Fibromyalgia and MS were my greatest fears-I was certain the hurting would never go away.

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              Baileybearposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              I had a pain disorder for many years - turned out it was one of the symptoms of my food sensitivities.   My diet is pretty boring these days, but I no longer have pain in my bones etc. 
              I just think someone wasting away from something like terminal cancer must be awful for both family & the person that is dying.

  2. Onusonus profile image86
    Onusonusposted 5 years ago

    I agree, he died Friday. Don't let anyone tell you anything different.

    1. lorlie6 profile image84
      lorlie6posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Haha, Onusonus, I won't!

  3. earnestshub profile image87
    earnestshubposted 5 years ago

    He certainly was a controversial figure.

    He saved a lot of people from pointless suffering and had the guts and compassion to put it all on the line.

    A good guy in my books. smile

    1. lorlie6 profile image84
      lorlie6posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I agree with you Earnest, but his handling of the press, etc., made him come across as some sort of devil.  He even looked like death incarnate.  I am really impressed, though, with his message and his opening up the scary subject of death and unbearable, terminally debilitating  pain.

      1. earnestshub profile image87
        earnestshubposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        And I agree with you Lorlie, his presentation was not at all good, and he always looked ill himself.

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        Baileybearposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        there was a forum post recently about the first man to have his moment of death filmed - he was dying from cancer.  I watched it - he went peacefully.  I think the whole way death is handled in the west just propagates fear

  4. CASE1WORKER profile image84
    CASE1WORKERposted 5 years ago

    ah that explains why my hub on him suddenly got a massive rise in traffic!

    1. lorlie6 profile image84
      lorlie6posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I'll have to check that out C1W.

    2. 0
      Baileybearposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I just went & read it and got bombarded with an ad video - first one I've seen on HP

 
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