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Hubpages is making how much?????

  1. SimeyC profile image89
    SimeyCposted 5 years ago

    I just read the news article about Hubpages inclusion in the Lead411s top technology 200 and saw the following line:

    "Applicants were required to be privately held, U.S. based companies with at least $500,000 million in revenue"

    WOW - that's $500 Billion - didn't realize HP was doing that well! Methinks it may be a typo?!

    1. wilderness profile image94
      wildernessposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Even though HP now takes in all the earnings from HPads and re-distributes I don't think that even if you call that revenue it would be that much.

      I think someone stuttered on the zero key.

      1. Aficionada profile image92
        Aficionadaposted 5 years ago in reply to this


        True dat! - or maybe they left out a hyphen between a "0" and the "m"? lol

    2. Cagsil profile image60
      Cagsilposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Yeah, it probably is a typo. lol

      Aside from the article you read, but your own typo counts as one that is even worse. lol

      $500,000 million isn't $500 Billion? lol

      1. SimeyC profile image89
        SimeyCposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        1000 million is now a Billion.

        When I were a young lad in England 1 Billion was 1,000,000,000,000 but alas it is no more!

        http://oxforddictionaries.com/page/howmanybillion

        1. Aficionada profile image92
          Aficionadaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Ooooh, Simey, thank you so much!  I asked about this, here:

          http://hubpages.com/forum/topic/77320#post1672852

          with no response.  sad 

          If you have any answers for the unanswered questions in that thread (and I understand that they would now be obsolete, according to the link you posted), I would love to know - i.e., I would love to know what those names were.

        2. WriteAngled profile image90
          WriteAngledposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          This pisses me off majorly.

          Why the hell should I have to adopt US conventions when British English is older by many centuries!

          As from now, I will not use the term billion ever again, as a protest!

          1. Greek One profile image80
            Greek Oneposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            should be in drachmas

            1. WriteAngled profile image90
              WriteAngledposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Drachmas, shekels, roubles, sesterces... 

              whatever...

              I don't care about the currency, but I want billion to retain its correct meaning!

            2. habee profile image91
              habeeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Should be in southern currency - pigs, chickens, and moonshine.

          2. Aficionada profile image92
            Aficionadaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            There is a more lengthy historical explanation in SimeyC's two other links.  A lot of what they described surprised me (the French connection, for example).

          3. Eaglekiwi profile image74
            Eaglekiwiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            lol Good for you wink

            Honestly Im broke ,no matter whose currency is up there.

          4. SimeyC profile image89
            SimeyCposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            LOL well as a British man I quite like the fact that I'm closer to being a US billionaire rather than a British billionaire!

            Sadly it's the international community that decides rather than the Brits or US! As an example - Aluminium is the standard word world wide in Engineering, even though the US says Aluminum - so the US doesn't always get their way!

      2. Aficionada profile image92
        Aficionadaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I don't understand what you are saying here, Cags.  (Sorry!)  Are you going by the old British system or the current one/American one?

        1. SimeyC profile image89
          SimeyCposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          The problem is that I don't think there is anything official anywhere - apparently there was a change many years ago, but I still used the British Billion when I first came to the US!

          Here's an interesting discussion though:

          http://mathforum.org/library/drmath/view/52579.html


          and here's one explaining all the terms:

          http://eyeful-tower.com/muse/billion.htm

          1. Aficionada profile image92
            Aficionadaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Thanks, SimeyC!  I'm heading over now to read both of these.

  2. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    Last year their profit was about 10 million according to the San Fran business times. Maybe that is what they have made in total since opening?

  3. Greek One profile image80
    Greek Oneposted 5 years ago

    that's just of my hubs alone!

  4. paradigmsearch profile image88
    paradigmsearchposted 5 years ago
    1. WriteAngled profile image90
      WriteAngledposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      According to information in that link, the average salary of HP staff is $78,220.

      I wouldn't mind a salary like that! I get perhaps 60% for working 18+ hour days most days including weekends.

  5. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    The American method is the American method, not the "current" one.  But therein lies the explanation.  You need three more zeros to be a British Billionaire.

    1. SimeyC profile image89
      SimeyCposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      The American is more 'accepted' though - when you hear that someone earned a Billion pounds it's generally the American Billion:

      http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-13321462

    2. Aficionada profile image92
      Aficionadaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Let me rephrase then:
      "Are you going by the old [or "used to be," as denoted in the article SimeyC linked] British system or the current [British] one ["now" or "nowadays," according to the Oxford Dictionaries article SimeyC linked], i.e. the American one?"

  6. Aficionada profile image92
    Aficionadaposted 5 years ago

    Fascinating discussions!  Thanks so much for the links - I've bookmarked them both.

    I was familiar with the term milliard from the time I spent in Germany, but I had not heard of billiard (except in connection with the game), trilliard, etc.

    And I was especially interested to see that France did not adopt the "├ęchelle longue" until 1948.

  7. Google Panda profile image60
    Google Pandaposted 5 years ago

    Man, break me off a piece of that!!

 
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