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Australian grammar

  1. jackcoburn profile image78
    jackcoburnposted 4 years ago

    I was wondering whether my use of Australian grammar would affect my hub score in terms of spelling mistakes? (assuming this website uses american grammar) At times I even use Australian slang to assist my stories would this also affect hub scores?

    1. IzzyM profile image87
      IzzyMposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I'm going to disagree with the previous posters.

      Try to write your hubs in US English because that is what the majority of searchers want.

      Avoid slang of any sort, except where it relates directly to your hub.

      It feels like misspellings to me to write in US English, but I try (usually, but not always).

      Americans will tell you spelling doesn't matter, and it really doesn't, except the search engine pick up on it and are more likely to assign your hubs to your regional area instead of worldwide.

      1. jackcoburn profile image78
        jackcoburnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Thanks for the advice!
        I'm not sure what I'm going to do because I feel as though I should use the grammar that my country uses due to the fact that I don't want to get to a point where I begin writing in US English all the time however I understand it would be costing me search views internationally.
        Cheers for your advice!

        1. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
          mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Most of my traffic still comes from the US in spite of my use of English spellings and grammar etc if that helps you decide smile

          1. jackcoburn profile image78
            jackcoburnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Thanks! I think I might stick to the grammar I already use now.

    2. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
      mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I wouldn't worry about it. I am British and use British grammar and spellings mostly, and no doubt a bit of British slang too wink My views recently hit over 3,000,000 which I achieved in four years, so I am guessing my British grammar,  spelling and slang is not too much of a problem big_smile

      1. jackcoburn profile image78
        jackcoburnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Wowzors! That's impressive!
        Cheers for the imput.

        1. mistyhorizon2003 profile image92
          mistyhorizon2003posted 4 years ago in reply to this

          You are very welcome smile

    3. janderson99 profile image85
      janderson99posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I"m an Aussie and I use a US spellchecker  => go with the flow

      1. jackcoburn profile image78
        jackcoburnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I just feel as if I'm changing for others thats all I'd rather just stick to what I know if possible it's not right or wrong.

    4. Pearldiver profile image88
      Pearldiverposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I am sure you'll get into a real blue if you start using aussi slang to talk about Rolf Harris, Shane Warne, the Wiggles, or dis kiwis digger! smile

      1. janderson99 profile image85
        janderson99posted 4 years ago in reply to this

        struth
        no Uees please

        1. Pearldiver profile image88
          Pearldiverposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Top Enders! roll

          Wonder if he's hav'n a do at his humpy on Origin Night.. smile

          1. janderson99 profile image85
            janderson99posted 4 years ago in reply to this

            fair suck of the sav,. You drongo

            1. Pearldiver profile image88
              Pearldiverposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Fair suck of the sav???
              Drongo???  sad

              Struth.. the Sav as well???  You return our Pav, Phar Lap and Kimbra first eh?

              Geeezz Wayne... you sheilas'd deny all seex reasons why the Dingo did et an then some! sad

  2. profile image0
    Motown2Chitownposted 4 years ago

    Honestly, Jack, I don't see that being a problem.  HP is an international community of writers and there are many folks who use British, Canadian, and Australian English while writing their hubs. 

    If you're interested in the specifics of how a hubscore is calculated, check out the FAQ.

    http://hubpages.com/faq/

    Refer specifically to number 13.

    Have a great day, and happy hubbing!

    big_smile

  3. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 4 years ago

    Australian grammar is not different enough to cause problems.

  4. jackcoburn profile image78
    jackcoburnposted 4 years ago

    Cheers!
    Greatly appreciated.

  5. WriteAngled profile image90
    WriteAngledposted 4 years ago

    I always prepare my hubs in Word. I write them in my normal style in British English, and then I switch the language to US English for a spell check. However, I do not worry about particular expressions as such being more UK than US. I never use slang when writing or speaking otherwise, so that is not a problem. Thus, while my hubs are not pure US English, all the words that might be used in a search are in conformity with US spelling. I really hate having to do this, but feel it is a compromise I have to endure until I can find a platform to produce material, which will get more visitors from the UK.

    1. jackcoburn profile image78
      jackcoburnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks for your input!
      What about for example I wrote some stories the other day where I used Aussie slang and not even real english when I was quoting what the person was saying as I thought it would ad to the story, what's your opinion on this?

      1. WriteAngled profile image90
        WriteAngledposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I think stories are a totally different category. You are unlikely to get search traffic to them, so it will be up to you to promote them where you think best and drive views. For hubs that focus on fiction, I don't think it makes any difference what dialect of English you use.

        1. Aficionada profile image95
          Aficionadaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I heartily agree!

          As a matter of fact, in fiction the use of dialect can add color and nuance that would otherwise be missing.  But if there is a great deal of it, it might be a kindness to international readers to add a vocabulary list at the bottom of the hub.

        2. jackcoburn profile image78
          jackcoburnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Oh, ok cheers for clearing that up. smile

          1. jackcoburn profile image78
            jackcoburnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            to both WriteAngled and Aficionada

      2. Marisa Wright profile image92
        Marisa Wrightposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        US grammar?  I'm trying to think of instances where British/Australian and US grammar differ significantly, and I'm struggling. Spelling, now - that's a different matter, and I do sometimes use US spelling, depending on my mood!  But a lot of the time I use British/Aussie spelling and never had any comments or problems.

        I do think it's important to avoid slang or colloquialisms, outside of dialogue.  No one outside the Antipodes understands Aussie slang and you will lose readers that way.  Dialogue is different, because it needs to be reflect your character's speech - and you can often give the reader a clue to what it means in your text. 

        However, WriteAngled is right - don't expect to get many readers for fiction stories, and certainly don't expect to earn any money. 

        If you're active in the HubPages community (commenting on Hubs, being in the forums etc), you'll get other Hubbers reading your work, but we're only a small group, really. To make money, you have to attract readers via search engines like Google and Bing.  When you're writing a story, ask yourself, "what would someone have to type into Google to find this story?".  Then ask yourself, "is anyone likely to be looking for that?".  If the answer is no, you're not going to get readers easily.

        1. jackcoburn profile image78
          jackcoburnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I've realised I worded the title and description completely wrong so sorry to everyone for that.

          Regardless thank you for your input, I do not generally write fiction I was refering to some personal stories I wrote but I understand what you are saying.

          cheers!

  6. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 4 years ago

    The question is whether it would effect hubscore, and I am pretty sure it would not.

    Whether you should choose to write in US spelling, or spelling and grammar, or full dialect, is a different question.

  7. JKenny profile image94
    JKennyposted 4 years ago

    I used to worry about this- but I asked a question about this and most of the responses were from Americans and they just told me to continue writing in British English. Yeah there are a few subtle differences but my work is still readable.

    1. jackcoburn profile image78
      jackcoburnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks for your input. smile

  8. Jeff Berndt profile image91
    Jeff Berndtposted 4 years ago

    Based on the responses here, especially those written in 'Strine, I think an article about Australian  grammar and/or slang would be well-received.

    I know I'd read it.

    1. Marisa Wright profile image92
      Marisa Wrightposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      As a Brit living in Australia, I can tell you that Australian and British grammar are identical.  I'm still trying to think of any differences with American grammar and I'd love some other Aussies or Brits to chime in and point some out.

      Of course, there's a difference in any language between proper grammar and the way the average person mangles grammar in everyday speech!

      1. Jeff Berndt profile image91
        Jeff Berndtposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Of course you're right. English grammar is the same across the English-speaking world. Usage is what's different from place to place.

  9. Kangaroo_Jase profile image81
    Kangaroo_Jaseposted 4 years ago

    Aussie, Aussie, Aussie! Oi, Oi Oi, Aussie! Oi! Aussie! Oi, Aussie Aussie Aussie, Oi Oi Oi!!!

    Heya and G'Day Jack.

    I have found in the last three years of writing on the internet it is only our style of spelling that's different to US spelling that attracts a certain amount of natural searches from the related search engines.

    Aussie words gear a higher amount of Aussie searches and vice versa with US spelling and Google searches.

    But overall - readers are not fussed and I have never had one single comment from someone as a native outside Australia ask me to change my spelling because they are American/UK/English/Canadian, etc.

    So it has never been an issue.

    1. jackcoburn profile image78
      jackcoburnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Hey mate thanks for the comment I appreciate it!
      I have a better understanding towards how search engines and hubbers react to different forms of spelling/grammar through everyones input yours included of course!

      Cheers!

      1. Kangaroo_Jase profile image81
        Kangaroo_Jaseposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Your welcome Jack.

        Its a visceral feel of a read that writing articles for your target audience has an impact. This may also be more so for poems and creative writing.

        Knowing your target audience and writing to them also makes sense to me. For example, I know 'G'day, Hows its going, I am writing today about...' is aimed at Australians other than ' Wazzup bro! Lemme tell ya somethin... is most likely from a part of North America,'

        For me I get a better feel of what target is aimed at when reading other peoples information.

        Mind you - food recipes - they are truly international writings smile

  10. Pearldiver profile image88
    Pearldiverposted 4 years ago

    Yeah Right!!!! roll

    Hopping Right Along.... Kangaroo Oi Oi Oi!!

    Not a bloody issue huh? big_smile

    How about some Aussie struths eh??? big_smile

    When are ya sending Big Red Home eh? 

    Why did it take 30 years to admit that the Dingo did it eh? sad

    What's the real story behind Greg Mathews, Shane Warne and Rolf Harris and the "...... Hair Yeah Yeah!" company adverts huh?

    Heya and G'Day Kangaroo Jase! smile

    1. Kangaroo_Jase profile image81
      Kangaroo_Jaseposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Heya PD,

      First of all, when you bloody Kiwis gonna take ya bloody pavlovas back home?

      Slingin the slang wit' a bit o Jim Jam with the tongue is wot we Kiwis and Aussies do best.

      Strewth PD (notice correct spelling, lol) Big Red is home.

      Did the dingo do it? I dunno, its what is considered 'official' now anyways.

      As for those cricketers losing hair........say no more.........

      Heya and G'day PD smile

  11. jackcoburn profile image78
    jackcoburnposted 4 years ago

    I wrote a hub on the topic for anybody who's interested.

 
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