10 Women Who Are Famous Because Of Science, Part II

Jane Goodall and chimpanzees

Where do I stop?

  1. Jane Goodall, PhD in ethology and author, has been a leader in chimpanzee research, and has devoted her life to primate advocacy.  She founded the Jane Goodall Institute, a global nonprofit that seeks to "Improve global understanding and treatment of great apes through research, public education and advocacy" (http://www.janegoodall.org).  Visit her website to give a chimpanzee guardianship.  Jane's Journey, a film by Lorenz Knauer, premieres on October 8th, 2010, at the 18th Annual Hamptons Film Festival.

 

Famous Women Scientists

Virginia Apgar, MD (Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division)
Virginia Apgar, MD (Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division)
Rachel Carson (FWS photo)
Rachel Carson (FWS photo)
Rosalind Franklin (National Library of Medicine photo)
Rosalind Franklin (National Library of Medicine photo)
Margaret Mead (Library of Congress photo)
Margaret Mead (Library of Congress photo)
Olduvai Gorge where Mary Leakey worked. (Image courtesty of http://images.world66.com/ol/du/pa/oldupai_gorge_galleryfull)
Olduvai Gorge where Mary Leakey worked. (Image courtesty of http://images.world66.com/ol/du/pa/oldupai_gorge_galleryfull)

Rachel Carson Bridge in Pittsburgh

Photographer: Jet Lowe, 1999.  U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service
Photographer: Jet Lowe, 1999. U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service

and nine more

 
  1. Virginia Apgar (1909-1974). An excellent physician who developed the Apgar score (appearance, pulse, grimace, activity and respiration) to help assess neonates or newborn babies. The Apgar score helps determine whether the baby needs immediate medical attention. It is rapid, easily administered, reproducible, and both doctors and nurses use it all the time. Probably the nurses much more often than the doctors.
  2. Wú Jiànxíong (1912-1997). A PhD in physics, she contributed to the Manhattan Project and to work which later received the Nobel Prize, for which she was not credited.
  3. Mileva Marić (1875-1948). She studied mathematics and physics at the Zurich Polytechnic (ETH) and may have contributed to Albert Einsteins theory of relativity.
  4. Rosalind Franklin (1920-1958). A biophysicist and crystallographer, she made important contributions to determining the structure of DNA.
  5. Mary Leakey (1913-1996). An anthropologist and archeologist, she discovered a Proconsul africanus skull on Rusinga island.
  6. Barbara McClintock (1902-1992). A PhD in biology, she received a Nobel Prize for her work with mobile genetic elements.
  7. Margaret Mead (1901-1978). Noted anthroplogist and author of Coming of Age in Samoa, she is a controversial figure in the 21st century.
  8. Yvonne Barr, one of the discoverers of EBV (Epstein-Barr virus or HHV-4), a virus which infects as much as 95% of humans.
  9. Rachel Carson (1907-1964). A marine biologist, she wrote the book Silent Spring bringing the spraying of DDT and other pesticides to national attention.

Part of why I was attracted to this hub is that I have been attending events sponsored by the University of Washington in conjunction with their exhibit Changing the Face of Medicine: Celebrating America's Women Physicians (http://healthlinks.washington.edu/hsl/ctfom/) which is part of a traveling exhibit currently at Suzallo Library.

 

The UW Library has been generous enough to arrange programs which include showing the following movies: The Girl in White, (1952) starring June Allyson as Emily Dunning--you won't get this one from Netflix; Wanted! Doctor on Horseback - a documentary about Dr. Mary Percy; Helen's War: Portrait of a Dissident-- about Dr. Helen Caldicott, author of The New Nuclear Danger. Admission to the exhibit and programs is free. The exhibit closes on November 21st, 2008.

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Comments 2 comments

janessecret profile image

janessecret 5 years ago from Oz

Did you forget marie Curie? the most famous female scientist of all time?

J


minnow profile image

minnow 5 years ago from Seattle Author

good catch, janessecret. I'll have to add her. thanks. m

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