America's Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag

America's Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag

I pledge allegiance

to the flag

of the United States

of America

and to the Republic

for which it stands,

one Nation under God,

indivisible, with liberty

and justice for all.

What the symbols of the flag of the United States of America mean to me:

50 stars, one each for the 50 states in the Republic. 13 stripes for the 13 British colonies that united in revolt.  Red for the blood of patriots. White for a purity of intent. Blue for the prayed for blessings of Heaven.
50 stars, one each for the 50 states in the Republic. 13 stripes for the 13 British colonies that united in revolt. Red for the blood of patriots. White for a purity of intent. Blue for the prayed for blessings of Heaven. | Source

Some history of the pledge....

Whereas the present flag of the United States of America is the latest in a parade of similar flags dating back to the year 1777, the "Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag" was first recited by school children in 1892 and at the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus' discovery of the Americas.

Its original wording was written by Francis Bellamy who had been ordained a Baptist minister at the Baptist church of Little Falls, New York in 1879, and who, in 1892 was an associate editor of The Youth's Companion when U. S. President Benjamin Harrison urged Americans to create useful exercises for America's public schools and school children to celebrate that 400th anniversary.

Bellamy's original Pledge was "I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all." That Pledge was recited by school children at that year's National School Celebration, but added to in 1923 when the words "the flag of the United States of America" were added so as to include them. In 1942, during World War II, the Pledge was made a part of America's national flag code as part of the Pledge's 50th anniversary.

Likewise on Flag Day, June 14, 1954 President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed Joint House Resolution 243 which had been introduced in the House of Representatives by Louis C. Rabaut of Michigan and added the words "under God" to become the Pledge as it is recited today.

Representative Rabaut also requested that a song be composed about the Pledge, and a year later on Flag Day 1955 "Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag" by Irving Caesar was performed for the first time and sung by the U. S. Air Force's "Singing Sergeants" on the floor of the House of Representatives. It was then less than two years after the Cease-Fire Armistice of the Korean War and 36 years before the collapse of the Soviet Union which saw the end of the Cold War between the western powers and the Russian communists.

In countless senior citizens centers around the United States of America the Pledge is recited quite often before meals with an emotional fervor which arises from those citizens' memory of the trying challenges their generation has faced, and the special meaning that a pledge once written for school children has grown to have for those who have lived through many of the tests and trials America has survived in the 20th and 21st centuries.




The expanded words of the Pledge are still recited.

In the public school these children attend, the "Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag" is still recited every day before the start of the day's classes.
In the public school these children attend, the "Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag" is still recited every day before the start of the day's classes. | Source

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Copyright 2014 Demas W. Jasper All rights reserved.

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Comments 4 comments

Ericdierker profile image

Ericdierker 2 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

Thank you for this very interesting article on something I am proud to still know and recite.


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 2 years ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

Ericdierker - It was an interesting one to research and write, and I too am a proud reciter and always have been.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 2 years ago from Wales

This was so interesting and very well researched. Thank you for sharing .

Eddy.


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 2 years ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

Eiddwen - Thanks for finding it, reading it, commenting, and scoring. You are a true Hubber (and write great Hubs, too!)

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