Ancient Rome in vintage postcards

All roads lead to Rome

Ancient Rome is a subject of seemingly endless fascination to modern humanity, perhaps because it, more than other empires, represents some ideal of strength and stability, which contrasts starkly with our age of rapid, discontinuous change and the neuroses and fears that accompany our experience of the world.

Rome, was founded, according to legend, in about the 9th Century BCE, though in fact the area where Rome now stands was inhabited possibly some 14000 years ago. The Eternal City, as it came to be known, grew into a formidable empire situated around the Mediterranean and extending beyond, connected with a spider's web of roads which indeed, all led to Rome.

Another reason why we are so fascinated with Rome is that its experience of the end of empire is also ours. In the last century the once-great British Empire crumbled and fell, the Russian Empire of communism rose and fell, the United States Empire (though of course these latter two would deny the appellation “Empire”) became almost all powerful and in this century a new imperialism is at work – the imperialism of China, which is starting to challenge the hegemony of the United States.

The fact is that human history is full of the expansion and contraction of human societies – we have seen them all, faith-based entities like the Christian and the Muslim, politically-based like the Russian Communist Empire, economically-based like the US Empire, and even attempts, which fortunately failed, at racially-based empires. Of course, all Empires contained elements of all of these characteristics, and I am using the term “empire” rather loosely here.

The myth of Rome

The seeming stability and strength of ancient Rome is, of course, an illusion. The people of Rome faced the same fears, the same disruptions, that we face today, perhaps at a slightly slower pace, but very real and angst-ridden for all that.

These musings on Rome and empire were prompted by some old postcards of Rome that my Great-Aunt Hetty McGregor had collected at the beginning of the 20th Century and which I have recently re-discovered.

These postcards show, rather romantically, the ruins of the splendour that was Rome. They are reminders that the Eternal City is not really so Eternal, but is, like all human constructs, liable to decay.

The Romans must have had a sense of the fragility of their society and built monumental structures to distract their minds and give themselves a sense of permanence. It is those structures that these postcards show.

While in Rome some years back I bought a little book called Rome Past and Present , put together by Professor R.A. Staccioli and published by Vision Publications in 1993.

The beauty of this book is that it shows reconstructions of how the buildings might have looked at the time when they were built. These reconstructions are printed on clear plastic overlays which fit over photos of the ruins. A brilliant idea and this helps one to understand the past.

The Forum Romanum

I have visited Rome but once, and on that occasion I was intensely moved by a visit to the Forum Romanum . The guide (not a professional guide, but a professor of history who had made a study of the Forum) pointed to the place where Julius Caesar and the Ides of March had their fatal encounter: “Et tu, Brute ? Then fall, Caesar!”

These two postcards illustrate the Forum Square with the remains of the Temple of Saturn and the Triumphal Arch of Septimius Severus in the centre and the three remaining pillars of the Temple of Concord to the left.

The Temple of Saturn is regarded as one of the oldest in Rome, although the parts of it left standing now are part of restorations done in 42 BCE and during the 4th Century CE. The inscription on the pediment reads Senatus Populusque Romanus incendio consumptum restituit , meaning "The Senate and People of Rome restored what fire had consumed".

The Temple of Concord was built by the dictator Marcus Furius Camillus (ca. 446 – 365 BC) to celebrate the reconciliation he helped to facilitate between the plebeians and the patricians in 367 BCE.

Septimius Severus, also known as the “African Emperor” because he was born in what is today Libya, erected the Triumphal Arch in 203 to celebrate his victory over the Parthians. Severus was also known for his persecution of Jews and Christians, whom he seems to have pursued with some vigour.

The Circus Maximus: "panem et circenses"

[...] iam pridem, ex quo suffragia nulli / uendimus, effudit curas; nam qui dabat olim / imperium, fasces, legiones, omnia, nunc se / continet atque duas tantum res anxius optat, / panem et circenses . […] - Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis (Juvenal), Satire 10.77–81 (… Already long ago, from when we sold our vote to no man, the People have abdicated our duties; for the People who once upon a time handed out military command, high civil office, legions — everything, now restrains itself and anxiously hopes for just two things: bread and circuses.)

Dating from the time of the Etruscan kings, the Circus Maximus was both the oldest and the largest of the several chariot racing stadiums in Rome.

It also has the rather unenviable distinction of being the site of what is still the sports-related disaster with the largest death toll: in 140 CE 1112 punters were killed when the top level of the stadium collapsed.

It was part of the deliberate policy of the rulers of Rome to keep the populace quiescent by distracting them with entertainment and providing at least some food in the form of the grain dole, which was started by politician Gaius Sempronius Gracchus in 123 BCE.

The Circus Maximus could hold around 250000 people, and they came from all walks of life. As historian Robert B. Kebric writes in his book Roman People (McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Langua; 3 Sub edition, 2000): "Inside its four-story facade, the Circus was a maze of shops, rooms, stairways, and arcades. Throngs of people moved about the great interior corridor that provided access to any part of the structure. Vendors hawked their wares and sold refreshments and souvenirs; and, of course, there were always prostitutes, gamblers, pickpockets, girl watchers, and drunks."

Successive Emperors were interested in the chariot races and Nero actually took part. In spite of, on one occasion, being thrown off his chariot and having to be remounted, was declared winner! Guess it was a little risky for the other racers for him not to win.

The interest of the Emperors in the races is symbolised by the fact that the Circus Maximus is right alongside the Imperial Palace.

By the time the last race was run at the Circus Maximus in 550 CE the races had been going on for 1000 years. Will Newmarket one day top that?

The Arch of Constantine seen from the Colosseum
The Arch of Constantine seen from the Colosseum
The Arch of Constantine seen from Via Triumphalis
The Arch of Constantine seen from Via Triumphalis

The Arch of Constantine

In October 312 CE the Emperor Constantine I won a battle against Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius (c. 278 – 28 October 312) at the Milvian Bridge which, in the words of historian Paul K. Davis (100 Decisive Battles from Ancient Times to the Present: The World’s Major Battles and How They Shaped History, Oxford University Press, 1999) , “... gave him total control of the western Roman Empire, paving the way for Christianity as the dominant religion for the Roman Empire and ultimately for Europe."

It was in the prelude to this battle that, according to early historians Eusebius of Caesarea and Lactantius, the Emperor saw a vision of a cross, and the words (originally in Greek) in hoc signo vinces ("In this sign, you shall conquer"). This alleged vision led to profound changes in the Roman world, including the gradual establishment of the Roman Church, which in turn had profound consequences for the western world.

Constantine had the Arch built and dedicated in 315, making it the last in the series of triumphal arches in Rome, of which there are five.

Above the main archway is the inscription:

IMP · CAES · FL · CONSTANTINO · MAXIMO · P · F · AVGUSTO · S · P · Q · R · QVOD · INSTINCTV · DIVINITATIS · MENTIS · MAGNITVDINE · CVM · EXERCITV · SVO · TAM · DE · TYRANNO · QVAM · DE · OMNI · EIVS · FACTIONE · VNO · TEMPORE · IVSTIS · REM-PVBLICAM · VLTVS · EST · ARMIS · ARCVM · TRIVMPHIS · INSIGNEM · DICAVIT (To the Emperor Caesar Flavius Constantinus, the greatest, pious, and blessed Augustus: because he, inspired by the divine, and by the greatness of his mind, has delivered the state from the tyrant and all of his followers at the same time, with his army and just force of arms, the Senate and People of Rome have dedicated this arch, decorated with triumphs.)

Click thumbnail to view full-size
The first postcard picture of the mausoleumThe second postcard picture of the mausoleumA reconstruction by Prof Staccioli of what the mausoleum and bridge might have looked like originallyBust of the emperor Hadrian (AD 117-138) showing the famous beard. National Archaeological Museum in Athens, Room 32. Heavily processed with photoshop. WikipediaPart of the portico and rotunda of the Pantheon. Photo Tony McGregor
The first postcard picture of the mausoleum
The first postcard picture of the mausoleum
The second postcard picture of the mausoleum
The second postcard picture of the mausoleum
A reconstruction by Prof Staccioli of what the mausoleum and bridge might have looked like originally
A reconstruction by Prof Staccioli of what the mausoleum and bridge might have looked like originally
Bust of the emperor Hadrian (AD 117-138) showing the famous beard. National Archaeological Museum in Athens, Room 32. Heavily processed with photoshop. Wikipedia
Bust of the emperor Hadrian (AD 117-138) showing the famous beard. National Archaeological Museum in Athens, Room 32. Heavily processed with photoshop. Wikipedia
Part of the portico and rotunda of the Pantheon. Photo Tony McGregor
Part of the portico and rotunda of the Pantheon. Photo Tony McGregor

Castello e Ponte S. Angelo (Hadrian's Tomb and bridge)

Publius Aelius Hadrianus, Emperor of Rome from 117 CE to 138 CE, perhaps best known in the English-speaking world as Hadrian, famous for the wall in northern England, had a keen interest in architecture and was responsible for the rebuilding of that beautiful construction the Pantheon after the original had been destroyed by fire in about 80 CE. He was also notable for being the first Roman Emperor to be bearded.

Apart from the Pantheon, the other building for which Hadrian is remembered in Rome, is the Castel Sant'Angelo, built between 135 and 139, and the bridge, the Pons Aelius, which links it to the right bank of the Tiber River. Hadrian had the bridge built in 134.

Hadrian's ashes were deposited in the mausoleum in 139, together with those of his widow Sabina and adopted son Lucius.

The mausoleum was converted into a fortress in 401, but by 410 the Visigoths under Alaric looted the place and all the funerary urns were scattered and lost, along with much of the decoration of the tomb.

Further despoliation came with the Christian antagonism toward the “Pagan” Roman era and bits of the mausoleum were taken to add to the finery of St Peter's Basilica, including what could be the capstone of Hadrian's funerary urn. As Vasari noted (in the Preface to the Lives of the Artists , c1550): “...in order to build churches for the use of the Christians, not only were the most honoured temples of the idols [ie pagan Roman gods] destroyed, but in order to ennoble and decorate Saint Peter's with more ornaments than it then possessed, they took away the stone columns from the tomb of Hadrian, now the castle of Sant'Angelo, as well as many other things which we now see in ruins.”

One of the most famous examples of this cultural vandalism was the use by Pope Urban VIII of the bronze from the ceiling of the portico of the Pantheon to make bombards for the fortification of Castel St'Angelo, as Hadrian's Mausoleum had been renamed. Some of this stolen bronze might also have been used in the famous baldachin by Bernini in St Peter's.

By this time the mausoleum was part of the Vatican, connected to it by a raised passageway.

The cylindrical core of the mausoleum is 64 metres in diameter and was topped by an Etruscan-style tumulus and a huge pillar carrying a gilt bronze statue of the god Helios in his chariot.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Panoramic view from the Palatine HillTrajan's ColumnThe Tomb of Cecilia Metella
Panoramic view from the Palatine Hill
Panoramic view from the Palatine Hill
Trajan's Column
Trajan's Column
The Tomb of Cecilia Metella
The Tomb of Cecilia Metella

The final three postcards

The last three postcards in this group are of a view from the Palatine Hill, Trajan's Column and the Tomb of Cecilia Metella.

The Palatine Hill, the centre one of the seven on which Rome was built, is one of the most ancient parts of the city. It looks down on the Forum on one side and the Circus Maximus on the other. The hill features many ruins of ancient and imperial buildings and is being studied constantly by archaeologists.

Trajan's Column celebrates the Emperor's victory over the Dacians in 106 CE. It features a famous spiral bas relief showing the story of the Dacian Wars.

The final postcard is of the tomb of Cecilia Metella, built at the end of the first Century BCE to commemorate the daughter of Q. Caecilius Metellus, is situated adjacent to the Appian Way. It is now part of a castle built in the Middle Ages. The massive cylinder is veneered in Travertine marble, still largely there.

show route and directions
A markerForum Romanum -
Roman Forum, 00186 Rome, Italy
[get directions]

B markerColosseum -
Colosseum, Piazza del Colosseo, 00184 Rome, Italy
[get directions]

C markerHadrian's Mausoleum -
Castel Sant'Angelo, Lungotevere Castello, 00193 Roma, Italy
[get directions]

D markerCircus Maximus -
Circus Maximus, 00153 Rome, Italy
[get directions]

E markerTrajan's Column -
Trajan's Column, Foro Traiano, 1, 00187 Roma, Italy
[get directions]

More by this Author


Comments 46 comments

cvanthul profile image

cvanthul 6 years ago from Florida

Very interesting and informative hub. Thanks for sharing.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

cvanthul - thanks for visiting and commenting. Glad you enjoyed it.

Love and peace

Tony


Minnetonka Twin profile image

Minnetonka Twin 6 years ago from Minnesota

Wow, what a wonderful hub full of great information. Nice job and thanks for enlightening me.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

MT - glad you enjoyed it. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

Love and peace

Tony


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 6 years ago from South Africa

Though it is necessary for empires to come to a fall, it makes me sad. Like King Solomon said: “Everything is meaningless. What is was and will be again.” Though I don’t really think anything in life is meaningless. But yes, everything dies to be replaced by new things, new empires, new leaders.... I love history. This is truly a great hub, revealing some facts I did not know. Tony, you may be interested in this hub written by jambo – (He also wrote one about 5 ancient civilizations.) Ek wens jou alles van die beste toe!

http://hubpages.com/education/ecclesia


equealla profile image

equealla 6 years ago from Pretoria, South Africa

Humans are fascinating. Listening to the stories of long, long ago, always grabs my imagination, and pulls me away into the world back then. The postcards are too precious, and we are so priviledged to see them. Thank you for sharing them. Amazing that you have them after all these years!

I was just thinking, with the fifa still fresh in mind: What will our brand new proudly displayed stadiums look like after a 1000 years!!! I doubt it will hold the same grandeur as these old and impressive, though scarred, ruins still provoke.

I wish you had been my history teacher, many years ago. I would have found much more meaning and value in it, having it presented in such good fashion. Excellent article and I enjoyed the read.


Dim Flaxenwick profile image

Dim Flaxenwick 6 years ago from Great Britain

Fascinating. ! I love history at the best of times. This was a real ´treat´for me . Thank you, Tony,

love and peace as always,

Dim


loriamoore 6 years ago

Cool. I'm visiting Rome for the first time in April 2011 and it's good to know some of the history before going there.


equealla profile image

equealla 6 years ago from Pretoria, South Africa

loriamoore- lucky you. I'm so jealous!


sligobay profile image

sligobay 6 years ago from east of the equator

Thank you for sharing your postcards and placing their images in detailed historic perspective. This article was a giant undertaking but the result was well worth the effort. The British Empire was never shy about its imperialist ambition. America is just another apple that likes to call itself an orange. The USSR was a wannabe Empire which lacked the materialistic incentives that build an empire. China has positioned itself as the next great Empire with the population, resources, technology and weaponry to accomplish the task. It is unfortunate that fascism rather than democracy and human rights is the nature of the emerging Empire. But faith in the "power of the people" of China and their yearning for liberty expressed at Tianamen Square, may yet win the day. Thanks for your hard work, Tony.


De Greek profile image

De Greek 6 years ago from UK

I have been to Rome countless times, but the last one was three years ago with my wife and it was the most fortunate one of my trips. A man outside the Coliseum sold me a postcard clearly dated 367 BCE, celebrating the completion of the Temple of Concord built by the dictator Marcus Furius Camillus. I am sure that it is genuine, because he was dressed as a roman gladiator and he could not possibly have told me a lie. I am very proud of that postcard.


Micky Dee profile image

Micky Dee 6 years ago

Beautiful Tony. I saw the alert for this and had to shoot over. Even so- I'm late! Great job! "It was part of the deliberate policy of the rulers of Rome to keep the populace quiescent by distracting them with entertainment and providing at least some food in the form of the grain dole, which was started by politician Gaius Sempronius Gracchus in 123 BCE." Things never change. Now we have Basketball, football (your pick), baseball, tractor pulls, etc. ad nauseum. If we look at all these distractions it will take our minds off the fact that voting is really just a distraction too. Thank you Sir!


BennyTheWriter profile image

BennyTheWriter 6 years ago from Northeastern U.S.A.

Awesome hub Tony! I studied Latin for about 7 years of my life (which I can hardly believe myself), and I would often daydream of what life was like in a Roman villa, or how busy it was in the Forum, or what it must have been like to watch a race at the Circus Maximus. I imagine it must have been the Daytona 500 of the Ancient world.

A neat use of the new map capsule, might I add!

Thanks for bringing back some memories and jumpstarting those daydreams again :)


ainehannah profile image

ainehannah 6 years ago from Dublin

Lovely hub Tony, erudite and inspirational.


Loves To Read profile image

Loves To Read 6 years ago

Great informative hub Tony, you have put a lot of time and research into it. The postcards are wonderful and it was wonderful of you to share them with us all. Thank you..

Blessings.


Sally's Trove profile image

Sally's Trove 6 years ago from Southeastern Pennsylvania

Your Hub is a wonderful example of the inspiration that can be found in discovering old treasures. My hat's off to you and your great aunt!


msorensson profile image

msorensson 6 years ago

I love the hub. You write it with seeming effortless ease, but I do know that writing is not that easy for anyone, Tony, so thank you for sharing.

I have not been there but I love the movie "Gladiator" so much that I have seen it many times.

Thank you. I will definitely visit it some day.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 6 years ago from TEXAS

Oh, my, Tony! I don't want to be melodramatic, but your account and the gorgeous postcards (most of which I was able to enlarge to really see the detail) - the history you weave into it all truly make me FEEL like I was there, with all senses aware of sights, sounds, smells, temperatures and aura of the places, events & ambience. I've sometimes felt that much "into" movies or book-length stories, but you managed to capture me into your account of this place, its folks, its powerhouses, the whole thing. It felt just magical. I know it may sound over-done but if anything, it's short of the feelings I had reading it. I can't quite explain it - but I'm happy to attribute it to your ability to present it that well! It definitely gets my highest votes & accolades!


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Martie - thanks so much for your great comment adn the link to Jambo's Hub which I am now reading.

Francis - it seems to me that people in all the ages of history are very similar - we have the same desires and fears, hopes and anguish. I have never been a teacher but I would love to teach this kind of history. Thanks for the kind words.

Thank you both, my South African friends!

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Dim - glad you had a treat here! And you are, as always, most welcome!

Lori - I am a little envious! I would love to go back especially as I would now be better prepared.

Gerry - thanks for the insightful addition to the Hub! I hope the people of China do achieve their liberty one day! The spirit of Tiananmen Square lives on.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Dimitris - you are one lucky man to have gotten that postcard! Of course its genuine, I mean would he have sold you a fake? Marcus would have been Furius! There's a guy around the corner of the Colosseum - Oh, sorry, the Colosseum doesn't have corners, so where the hell did I see him? What was it I was going to say - damn, forgotten again, but after 2000 years that's not too surprising, is it? I'll just have to fu- fu- fu- fugit!


amillar profile image

amillar 6 years ago from Scotland, UK

Well the Romans came to Scotland but either they didn't like what they saw or that McGregor Clan robbed them and chased them. (No doubt the Campbell's would be suckin' up to them, as usual.)

I enjoyed the hub Tony; IV I'v always liked history.


always exploring profile image

always exploring 6 years ago from Southern Illinois

Tony, I learned so much from reading your hub about Rome.I clicked on the postcards, very beautiful. You are such a great writer and you put your heart and soul into everything you write about. Thank you for sharing.

Love and Peace


Nancy's Niche profile image

Nancy's Niche 6 years ago from USA

Tony, wonderful article & picture postcards...I have some old photos that my grandfather took while in Rome. During WWI, he traveled around the world twice and visited some beautiful locations. Italy and Spain seemed to be his favorites...


Raymond 6 years ago

This is well put together Tony well done, you know that over many yrs kingdoms and empires do fall and crumble, but there is one kingdom which will never fall or crumble, the kingdom of God.

I've been to many places but still have to go to Rome.

this has given me a good vision of Rome.


AuriFin profile image

AuriFin 6 years ago

That's so different guide to a city I always wanted to visit - despite the history which meets your eyes in every corner (so I was told) never thought of looking at it from a vintage perspective :) I truly appreciated the trip! Thanks for sharing it with us :)


reddog1027 profile image

reddog1027 6 years ago from Atlanta, GA

Thanks for a tour of one of the places on my bucket list. I especially enjoyed the vintage postcards.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Micky - you are never late, my brother! Thanks for the wonderful comment.

Benny - I'm so glad you enjoyed this one, and thanks for the kind words.

Thanks to you both for stopping by and commenting.

Love and peace

Tony


culturespain 6 years ago

Great stuff - and nice to have a Hub on antiquity. I was always rather impressed by the concept of Pax Romana (if I have that right!). This was the peace that (at its best) Rome enforced...


kirstein.peter53 profile image

kirstein.peter53 6 years ago from Maseru

Very interesting hub! Especially as I learned a lot about the early history of Rome during my Latin studies at High School!


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Aine - thank you for stopping by.

LTR - thanks to you too for stopping by and the kind words.

Sally - your kind words are music to my ears! Thanks.

Melinda - thanks for your kind comment. It was quite hard work but made worthwhile by getting such a lovely comment from you!

Thanks again everyone for stopping by and commenting. Much appreciated.

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Nellieanna - thanks for your very generous response to my humble effort! I really appreciate your comment more than words can say.

Amillar - yes, we McGregors never did like to give in to the Sassenachs. Can't say anything bad about the Campbells here though - Charlie (Ralwus) would get back at me!

Ruby - thanks for your kind words. Glad you found it a useful read.

Nancy - why not write a Hub about those photos. I would certainly like to read it and see the photos. He must have had an interesting life.

Raymond - thanks for the comment. I hope you do get to visit Rome.

AuriFin - you are most welcome, and thanks for the visit and the comment.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Carol - you will not be disappointed to go to Rome, it's beautiful! Glad you liked the postcards.

Nick - thanks for the visit and the comment. Much appreciated

Pete - always glad to see you. Thanks for the comment

Love and peace

Tony


KoffeeKlatch Gals profile image

KoffeeKlatch Gals 6 years ago from Sunny Florida

I love the postcards. The information and writing is superb. I have alsways wanted to visit Rome. My daughter was there last year and fell in love with it. Great job.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

KKG - thanks so much for stopping by and commenting. I have lots and lots more postcards to share, so watch out!

Love and peace

Tony


jambo87 profile image

jambo87 6 years ago from Outer Space / Inner Space

Great hub Tony. For all of Rome's decadence, inspiration, power, and awe, these ruins are monumental for a reason. I like that you provided a contemporary spin by connecting Rome to China, Russia, England, and America. As students of history, there is always more to learn about each of these "great" empires.

@MartieCoetster - thanks for enjoying my hub enough to recommend it to others.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Jambo - yes indeed, the ruins are momumental for a reason! And the rise, decline and eventual fall of empires is always a fascinating study.

Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

Love and peace

Tony


Mentalist acer profile image

Mentalist acer 6 years ago from A Voice in your Mind!

Rome is the ultimate lesson for the U.S.,great Hub Tony;)


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Mentalist - indeed, for any country tempted into hubris!

Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

Love and peace

Tony


Dolores Monet profile image

Dolores Monet 6 years ago from East Coast, United States

Beautiful hub. I loved the old postcards. I've seen a few of those Past and Present books, about other cities, and they really paint a wonderful picture of the past.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Dolores - don't know those books but I love reading about places like Rome and Athens. Old postcards really do interest me also. I have many more that will no doubt turn up in Hubs sometime!

Love and peace

Tony


twentyfive profile image

twentyfive 5 years ago

A vibrant historic tour. Great hub! :)


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Twentyfive - thanks for your kind words. Glad you enjoyed the trip!

Love and peace

Tony


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 5 years ago from Houston, Texas

Love these old postcards and of course your writing and filling in the background makes them even more interesting. Thank you!


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa Author

Peggy - thanks so much. I know you also like postcards. This Hub was a delight to research and write. Thanks again for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


gepeTooRs 7 months ago

is only a short drive.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working