Ask DJ Lyons about Middle School Anger Management Lesson about Blake

Angry Blake

Middle school student Blake is dealing with all kinds of anger issues mostly due to the conflict between his parents at home. The best way he knows to relieve the tension is to take it out on several of the kids at school. Find out what techniques he finally learned to deal with those conflictual feelings. Also, find out some of the tricks two clever students used to keep from being a victim of his bullying.

Angry Blake
Angry Blake | Source
Solving Conflict for Middle School Students
Solving Conflict for Middle School Students | Source

Solving Conflict for Middle School Students

Solving Conflict for Middle School students is a real challenge. Teaching about these techniques can be a lot easier if you have some field-tested lesson plans to use in the classroom.

From the fall of 1998 through the spring of 2003, Debbie Dunn taught over 500 middle school students a year conflict resolution techniques and strategies until a budget-cut in her school eliminated most of the special programs.

During that 5-year period, Debbie created over 3000 pages of curriculum for this class. When the class came to an end, she had thoughts of someday trying to get that curriculum published. In the meantime, she set it aside to gather dust in her storage room until ...

In the spring of 2008, she heard that two eleven-year-old boys committed suicide due to bullying. She thought, "Debbie, you do not have the right to have that material gather dust if it can help even one kid out there to feel more stable." She decided to offer all that material for free to anybody who could make use of it.

In the fall of 2008, she gained the title of being School Conflict Resolution Examiner for Examiner.com at the national level. She began posting that material on that site. Now that she is a part of HubPages, she wants to give HubPage readers easy access to those very pages. Hopefully, it will be helpful to the middle school kids in your lives.

At the end of this hub is a lesson plan link you can click on that will give you everything you need to print off and use in your home school, private school, or public school classroom. The lesson is appropriate for grades 5 through 8.

Here is what you will get.

Lesson Objectives for Anger Management Lesson Plan
Lesson Objectives for Anger Management Lesson Plan | Source

Lesson Objectives for Anger Management Lesson Plan

You will be able to read about the Lesson Objectives for teaching this Anger Management Lesson.

K-W-L MODEL discussion for Anger Management Lesson Plan
K-W-L MODEL discussion for Anger Management Lesson Plan | Source

K-W-L MODEL discussion for Anger Management Lesson Plan

You will get a K-W-L Model discussion procedure to use with your students. A teaching poster is included along with the lesson plan.

Vocabulary lesson for Anger Management Lesson Plan
Vocabulary lesson for Anger Management Lesson Plan | Source

Vocabulary lesson for Anger Management Lesson Plan

There is a Vocabulary lesson to use with this particular Anger Management Lesson Plan. Students will learn about Anger Triggers, Anger Cues, Anger Styles, and several Relaxation techniques.

Story for Anger Management Lesson Plan
Story for Anger Management Lesson Plan | Source

Story for Anger Management Lesson Plan

The story about Blake is included in this lesson. It is based on the kinds of issues middle school students had to face at the school where Debbie used to teach. These are similar issues that middle school students have to face all over this country.

Popcorn Review
Popcorn Review | Source

Popcorn Review

Here is a fun technique you can use at the end of any lesson to check how much the students learned. It only takes a minute or two. It's called a Popcorn Review.

Role-Play for Anger Management Lesson Plan
Role-Play for Anger Management Lesson Plan | Source

Role-Play for Anger Management Lesson Plan

Students learn best by trying on concepts for size, so to speak. After hearing the teacher read the story, they can assimilate those concepts even better by acting the story out.

Choose eager volunteers to play the actor parts. Then have the rest of the class take turns reading the narrator parts. The students find this process to be lots of fun.

You will get a scripted role-play as a PDF file that you can print off and use in your classroom. To save on paper, you might only want to print off ten copies that the students can pass around and share. If you have a large screen projector, perhaps you could post the role-play on that and save on paper altogether.

You will also get directions how to introduce the role-play. It is a scripted version of the story.

Blooms Taxonomy Discussion for Anger Management Lesson Plan
Blooms Taxonomy Discussion for Anger Management Lesson Plan | Source

Blooms Taxonomy Discussion for Anger Management Lesson Plan

There is a Bloom's Taxonomy Discussion that you can lead your students through complete with questions and suggested answers. This will further reinforce all concepts taughts and also get the students thinking and processing.

Writing assignment for Anger Management Lesson Plan
Writing assignment for Anger Management Lesson Plan | Source

Writing assignment for Anger Management Lesson Plan

If you need a writing assignment to use with your students, you can use this activity. After discussing the Bloom's Taxonomy discussion questions as a class, you could get each student to write out their own individual answers. You can use this activity as a kind of test of their new knowledge gained.

Lesson Plan for teaching Anger Management
Lesson Plan for teaching Anger Management | Source

Lesson Plan for teaching Anger Management

Drum roll please!

Here it is at last - the Anger Management Lesson Plan about Blake.

Children and Arguing or Divorcing Parents

Putting Children First: Proven Parenting Strategies for Helping Children Thrive Through Divorce
Putting Children First: Proven Parenting Strategies for Helping Children Thrive Through Divorce

An internationally renowned authority on children and divorce reveals the latest research-based strategies for helping children survive and thrive before, during, and long after their parents divorce.

The breakup of a family can have an enduring impact on children. But as Dr. JoAnne Pedro-Carroll explains with clarity and compassion in this powerful book, parents can positively alter the immediate and long-term effects of divorce on their children. The key is proven, emotionally intelligent parenting strategies that promote children's emotional health, resilience, and ability to lead satisfying lives.

Over the past three decades, Pedro-Carroll has worked with families in transition, conducted research, and developed and directed award- winning, court-endorsed programs that have helped thousands of families navigate divorce and its aftermath. Now she shares practical, research- based advice that helps parents:

•gain a deeper understanding of what their children are experiencing

•develop emotionally intelligent parenting strategies with the critical combination of boundless love and appropriate limits on behavior

•reduce conflict with a former spouse and protect children from conflict's damaging effects

•learn what recent brain research reveals about stress and children's developing capabilities

Filled with the voices and drawings of children and the stories of families, Putting Children First delivers a positive vision for a future of hope and healing.

 
Divorce Is Not the End of the World: Zoe's and Evan's Coping Guide for Kids
Divorce Is Not the End of the World: Zoe's and Evan's Coping Guide for Kids

Zoe and Evan Stern know firsthand how it feels when your parents divorce. When their parents split they knew their lives would change but they didn't know how. A few years later, when they were 15 and 13 years old, they decided to share their experience in this positive and practical guide for kids. With some help from their mom, Zoe and Evan write about topics like guilt, anger, fear, adjusting to different rules in different houses, dealing with special occasions like birthdays, adapting to stepparents and blended families, and much more. Including updates from grown-up Zoe and Evan 10 years later, this honest guide will reassure children of divorce that, though it may seem it sometimes, it's not the end of the world.

"Here is a great resource for tweens and teens...from two of their own. Zoe and Evan give a helpful perspective to other kids that will aid them with their own divorce experiences. Their words and advice ring true.

--VICKI LANSKY, author of Vicki Lansky's Divorce Book for Parents: Helping Kids Cope with Divorce and Its Aftermath

 
What About the Kids?: Raising Your Children Before, During, and After Divorce
What About the Kids?: Raising Your Children Before, During, and After Divorce

The founder and executive director for the Center for the Family in Transition, Wallerstein taught at UC Berkeley for more than 25 years, but is best known as the author of The Unexpected Legacy of Divorce, which taught adult children of divorce how to recognize reactive divorce-based behavior patterns. Here with New York Times science writer Blakeslee, Wallerstein explicitly hopes to complement Dr. Spock and Dr. T. Berry Brazelton’s child rearing how-tos by showing parents how to guide children through the dissolution of a marriage. She does an excellent job. After a chapter that advises parents to get their own heads straight before dealing with the kids ("I wish I could tell you that it’s ok to lie down and pull the covers over your head, but that’s not possible"), Wallerstein addresses the developmental problems that infants and toddlers might face and ways of easing them into differing options for care. She’s forthright in talking about the reactions of older children ("Teenagers can be excellent manipulators. All of them do it, but children of divorce have much more to work with"), and talks about their needs with empathy, insight and rigor, but never loses sight of what parents need and feel, too. Chapters cover "The Breakup," "Parent to Parent" advice on custody and avoiding disputes, "The Post-Divorce Family," "Second Marriage" and "Conversations for a Lifetime," or talks that help kids not to be afraid of love and commitment. Addressing everything from parent-to-parent blame to the many forms of child-to-parent resentment, Wallerstein offers firm honesty and supportive encouragement. Divorcing parents will be grateful for it, and a confirmed Today show appearance and satellite TV tour should help spread the word.

Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

 
Between Two Worlds: The Inner Lives of Children of Divorce
Between Two Worlds: The Inner Lives of Children of Divorce

Is there really such a thing as a good divorce ? Determined to uncover the truth, Elizabeth Marquardt herself a child of divorce conducted, with Professor Norval Glenn, a pioneering national study of children of divorce, surveying 1,500 young adults from both divorced and intact families between 2001 and 2003. In Between Two Worlds, she weaves the findings of that study together with powerful, unsentimental stories of the childhoods of young people from divorced families.

The hard truth, she says, is that while divorce is sometimes necessary, even amicable divorces sow lasting inner conflict in the lives of children. When a family breaks in two, children who stay in touch with both parents must travel between two worlds, trying alone to reconcile their parents often strikingly different beliefs, values, and ways of living. Authoritative, beautifully written, and alive with the voices of men and women whose lives were changed by divorce, Marquardt s book is essential reading for anyone who grew up between two worlds.

Makes a persuasive case against the culture of casual divorce. Washington Post

 
The Co-Parenting Survival Guide: Letting Go of Conflict After a Difficult Divorce
The Co-Parenting Survival Guide: Letting Go of Conflict After a Difficult Divorce

When couples have children, an acrimonious divorce can be painful for everyone involved. Couples can bear enormous resentment, anger and disappointment toward each other yet they still have to collaborate on one of the most complicated and difficult jobs in the world: child-rearing. Too often the intricacies of visitation, holiday plans and differences over discipline are left to lawyers, escalating the antagonism. Psychologists Elizabeth S. Thayer and Jeffrey Zimmerman argue that it doesn't have to be that way, and in The Co-Parenting Survival Guide: Letting Go of Conflict After a Difficult Divorce they help parents work harmoniously with their exes. Founders of Parents Allied to Co-Parent Effectively (PEACE), a service for high-conflict divorced or divorcing parents, the authors offer advice from conflict resolution to dealing with stepparents that could save parents thousands of dollars in legal fees and protect kids from needless misery and trauma. ( Aug.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

 
Joint Custody with a Jerk: Raising a Child with an Uncooperative Ex
Joint Custody with a Jerk: Raising a Child with an Uncooperative Ex

arenting is difficult enough in a family where the two parents love and respect each other. In divorce, where the respect has diminished and the love has often turned into intense dislike, co-parenting cane drive on or both parents to the brink of insanity. Joint Custody with a Jerk offers many proven communication techniques that will help you deal with your difficult ex-husband or ex-wife by describing examples of common problems and teaching you to examine your role in these sticky situations. These strategies for effective mediation are easy to apply, down-to-earth, and innovative.

 
Mama and Daddy Bear's Divorce (Albert Whitman Prairie Books (Paperback))
Mama and Daddy Bear's Divorce (Albert Whitman Prairie Books (Paperback))

PreSchool-Grade 1-This book provides reassurance that, as painful and confusing as a divorce may be, it does not mean that both parents will no longer be part of a youngster's life. In a series of short sentences, readers learn about Dinah's favorite people (her mama, her daddy, and her big sister); her favorite activities; and her favorite things (her stuffed rabbit and her red sandals). The words used to describe the divorce and what it means are carefully chosen, and the expressions on the bear characters' faces are appropriately sad. However, the message of this book is that life goes on. And so, while Dinah misses Daddy when she is with her mother, and misses Mama when she is with her father, some things, including her stuffed animal and red sandals, remain the same. The family celebrates some special occasions together, such as Dinah's birthday, and the youngster realizes that her parents and her sister love her very much. In a note to adults, Spelman outlines children's concerns about divorce. The large, appealing colored-pencil and watercolor illustrations support both the tone and the goal of the text. Brigitte Weninger's Good-Bye, Daddy! (North-South, 1995), Laurie Krasny Brown and Marc Brown's Dinosaurs Divorce (Atlantic Monthly, 1986), Linda Walvoord Girard's At Daddy's on Saturdays (Albert Whitman, 1987), and Fred Rogers's Divorce (Putnam, 1996) are also appropriate for this audience. Add Spelman's title where needed.

Linda Greengrass, Bank Street College Library, New York City

Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

 
A Smart Girl's Guide to Her Parents' Divorce: How to Land on Your Feet When Your World Turns Upside Down (American Girl)
A Smart Girl's Guide to Her Parents' Divorce: How to Land on Your Feet When Your World Turns Upside Down (American Girl)

Grade 3–5—Short chapters illustrated with bright cartoon drawings cover many important concerns and offer explanations of the divorce process. Topics range from how to deal with negative emotions, family changes, and new living arrangements, to tougher issues such as violence and financial troubles. The text has a compassionate tone, and sprinkled throughout are answers to questions that readers might have as well as snippets of advice from girls who have found what works for them. A few write-in quizzes are included. This book promises to be a helpful guide.—Donna Atmur, Los Angeles Public Library

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

 
The Divorce Workbook for Children: Help for Kids to Overcome Difficult Family Changes and Grow up Happy
The Divorce Workbook for Children: Help for Kids to Overcome Difficult Family Changes and Grow up Happy

Divorce affects thousands of children each year, and each and every one of them will benefit from the caring, friendly activities in this book. While children may sometimes not show apparent signs of the stress of a divorce, the strain it places on them is very real and, left undealt with, can develop into serious problems in the years to come. Written by an experienced counselor, The Divorce Workbook for Children offers you simple and engaging activities that can help you help kids address and cope with issues related to parental divorce. The goal of these activities is to help kids feel "out of the middle" of the parental conflict and learn to be more resilient and self-reliant. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

 
Divorce Helpbook for Teens (Rebuilding Books)
Divorce Helpbook for Teens (Rebuilding Books)

The popular author of THE DIVORCE HELPBOOK FOR KIDS is back with an all-new resource for teenagers in divorced and divorcing families. MacGregor knows that divorce can be especially tough on teens, and her warm and friendly guide offers a helping hand to teens struggling to answer the tough questions when their parents divorce: Why do parents get divorced? How will the divorce change our lives? What can I do to feel less depressed? Whom can I talk with about my problems? What’s likely to happen next? How do you tell absent parents that they don’t visit often enough? How do you say "no" to parents who want you to carry messages to, or spy on, the other parent? What is there to talk about when you visit a parent who’s moved away?

Packed with vignettes, strategies, and solid advice, THE DIVORCE HELPBOOK FOR TEENS is a resource teens will keep in their backpacks, on their bedside tables, and in their hearts as they go through the difficult times surrounding a family breakup. As MacGregor wisely counsels her readers: "You can’t undo the divorce, but you can change some of the hassles that resulted from it."

 

Children and Arguing or Divorcing Parents

When My Parents Argue
When My Parents Argue

Do you ever wonder why parents argue? Read about what Mya has to say about when her parents argue.

 
Stop Arguing with Your Kids: How to Win the Battle of Wills by Making Your Children Feel Heard
Stop Arguing with Your Kids: How to Win the Battle of Wills by Making Your Children Feel Heard

For parents fed up with constant challenges to their authority-but who dread becoming tyrants in their own homes-this book provides a powerful new alternative to "because I said so." Trusted family therapist and author Michael P. Nichols takes on the number-one problem of parents today with the insight and humor that has made his earlier The Lost Art of Listening an enduring bestseller. Presented is a simple, easy-to-follow, yet remarkably effective way to put an end to arguments by refusing to argue back. Instead, the techniques of responsive listening help parents open up better communication in the family; create an atmosphere of respect and cooperation; and take children's feelings into account-without giving in to their demands. Loads of realistic examples help parents defuse whining and defiance and manage common conflicts with preschoolers to teens.

 
Babyproofing Your Marriage: How to Laugh More, Argue Less, and Communicate Better as Your Family Grows
Babyproofing Your Marriage: How to Laugh More, Argue Less, and Communicate Better as Your Family Grows

The Babyproofers are three women who wouldn't trade their roles as mothers for anything, and they love their husbands deeply. But after living through it and hearing the stories of hundreds of other couples, they know that with young children in the house, you need to block the stairs with baby gates, put plastic covers over the outlets, AND take the necessary steps to safeguard your marriage.

Babyproofing Your Marriage is the warts-and-all truth about how having children can affect your relationship. The transition to parenthood can be a tough adjustment for any couple, but the good news is: you are not alone. Better yet, there are hundreds of simple but effective ways you can stay connected as husband and wife and still be good parents. The authors' evenhanded approach to both sides of the marital equation allows spouses to understand each other in a whole new way. With loads of humor, compassion, and practical advice, the Babyproofers will guide first-time parents and veterans alike around the rocky shores of the early parenting years.

 
You Don't Really Know Me: Why Mothers and Daughters Fight, and How Both Can Win
You Don't Really Know Me: Why Mothers and Daughters Fight, and How Both Can Win

What do teenage girls really want from their mothers? British Psychologist Terri Apter offers uncommon wisdom about the "tricky equation" between a daughter's identity and that of her mother. Challenging the idea that girls want to reject dear old mom, Apter suggests that most battles between mothers and daughters are fought to transform the relationship rather than trash it. Arguments become a daughter's way of asking two essential questions: "How can I get my mother to see me the way I am or the way I want to be?" and "How can I keep this important relationship up-to-date and useful to me?" By focusing on how daughters can remain attached to their mothers as they grow, each chapter underlines conflict as means for a daughter to define herself. Apter avoids generalities and targets smart specifics with examples, strategies and sample conversations. She offers an anatomy of a mother-daughter meltdown, nails four patterns of teen lying, and offers guidelines for dialogue about rules and risk assessment. She explains how to navigate food fights, discouraging words, harsh hyperbole ("you are ruining my life!") and the "I know that already" sex talk. Battle fatigued mothers--and the daughters who want to love them without leaving them--will welcome Apter's hopeful, insightful approach. --Barbara Mackoff

 
Argue-Negotiate With Your Children and They Will Negotiate For Their Lives
Argue-Negotiate With Your Children and They Will Negotiate For Their Lives

The funny thing about being a parent, first we take the test, and then we get the lesson! I have two sons, ages twelve and fifteen, and I wanted to get some expert advice that would help us with our "Negotiating Moments." I went looking for information on the Web and in bookstores that could help me with the fine art of negotiating with kids. However, I found very little. As my first son became a knucklehead teenager, I began to realize that our negotiating moments were getting a little more heated, and his reasons and abilities to argue negotiate were very pathetic and infantile. As a parent, I became very nervous and concerned. I knew that I was going to have a tremendous effect on my son's destiny, because as a parent, I was going to set the stage for his life.

Our experiences, family relationships, daily rituals and motivations all form the way we run our households. We teach our children how to deal (negotiate) with others by modeling this behavior during interactions with them and others. This life skill is something they will take with them throughout their entire life. I believe that their future happiness and success will be directly affected by the outcome of the negotiating moments they experience at home.

I began to look at how I negotiate in my life, both at home and at work, and a light bulb went on. That is when I decided to write a book on this topic myself. I really believe in the content of this book. In fact, I use the techniques in this book on a daily basis.

My vision for Argue Negotiate With Your Children And They Will Negotiate For Their Lives! is to provide something simple, but worth reading (and learning), a reference manual filled with illustrations, quotes and stories. It is an easy to understand guide packed with examples for parents and children to use (and reuse) together. These practical examples address specific issues (negotiating moments) that typically occur within and outside of the family unit. Ultimately, I would like to use this information to change a life, save a life or help a life become fun again.

 
The Truth About Children and Divorce: Dealing with the Emotions So You and Your Children Can Thrive
The Truth About Children and Divorce: Dealing with the Emotions So You and Your Children Can Thrive

Nationally recognized expert Robert Emery applies his twenty-five years of experience as a researcher, therapist, and mediator to offer parents a new road map to divorce. Dr. Emery shows how our powerful emotions and the way we handle them shape how we divorce—and whether our children suffer or thrive in the long run. His message is hopeful, yet realistic—divorce is invariably painful, but parents can help promote their children’s resilience. With compassion and authority, Dr. Emery explains:

• Why it is so hard to really make divorce work

• How anger and fighting can keep people from really separating

• Why legal matters should be one of the last tasks

• Why parental love—and limit setting—can be the best "therapy" for kids

• How to talk to children, create workable parenting schedules, and more

 
Helping Your Kids Cope with Divorce the Sandcastles Way
Helping Your Kids Cope with Divorce the Sandcastles Way

Kids tend to blame themselves when parents divorce. The Sandcastles workshop--now mandatory in over a dozen counties throughout the United States--is a half-day group session for children of divorce between the ages of 6 and 17. This intensive workshop helps kids open up and deal with their feelings through drawings, games, poetry, role playing, and other activities. Helping Your Kids Cope with Divorce details many of the workshop exercises, all designed to increase communication, understanding, and togetherness between parents and kids. The book is also packed full of suggestions on everything from the best way to break the divorce news to a child (it differs according to age group) to facing the holidays, visitation, custody arrangements, anger, discipline, co-parenting, single parenting, overcompensation, sorrow, custody fights, and much more.

Author Gary Neuman never patronizes or preaches, and although he is technically a child advocate, he proves himself to be an advocate of every member of the divorcing family. Neuman takes a hands-on approach and believes that children need not be permanently scarred by divorce--that with work and time, divorce can actually become a positive force for change. A powerful tool for protecting children caught amid parental struggles, Helping Your Kids Cope with Divorce should be required reading in all divorcing families. --Ericka Lutz --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

 
Making Divorce Easier on Your Child: 50 Effective Ways to Help Children Adjust
Making Divorce Easier on Your Child: 50 Effective Ways to Help Children Adjust

From the bestselling authors of Parenting the Strong-Willed Child, expert strategies and action steps for divorcing parents

While there are many trade books on children and divorce, most tend to be filled with extensive discussions of the psychological impact on children, with little effective advice. You want immediate answers and quick access to expert strategies you can use to help your kids today and in the future. Making Divorce Easier on Your Child arms you with 50 effective strategies and action steps for helping your kids cope with divorce, packaged in a convenient, quick-bite format. It is based on the authors' years of clinical experience dealing with the children of divorce, as well as their extensive research into the causes and cures of divorce-related emotional problems.

"Informative and sensible, offering realistic, clear-cut recommendations."

Robert Brooks, Ph.D., Faculty, Harvard Medical School, and coauthor of Raising Resilient Children

 
Difficult Questions Kids Ask and Are Afraid to Ask About Divorce
Difficult Questions Kids Ask and Are Afraid to Ask About Divorce

In a question-and-answer dialogue format, the authors tackle the concerns hidden behind what kids say and provide suggestions for dealing with those problems, whether they be feelings of blame, desertion, or a child's hopes for reconciliation. 15,000 first printing.

 
What in the World Do You Do When Your Parents Divorce? A Survival Guide for Kids
What in the World Do You Do When Your Parents Divorce? A Survival Guide for Kids

This companion to the Juggling Act parent's book is specially aimed at kids ages 7-12. It explains divorce, new living arrangements, and other basics to help children understand what's happening in their lives. With honesty and simplicity, the authors help kids realize that divorce isn't their fault, strong emotions are okay, and families can survive difficult changes. Written to and for kids, this book is also recommended for parents, educators, counselors, and youth workers.

 

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