The Chisholm Trail

Jesse Chisholm

Jesse Chisholm, for whom the Chisholm Trail was eventually named.
Jesse Chisholm, for whom the Chisholm Trail was eventually named. | Source
Descendants of Jesse Chisholm
Descendants of Jesse Chisholm | Source

The Chisholm Trail and Jesse Chisholm

Jesse Chisholm was born in the Hiwassee region of Tennessee sometime between 1805 and 1806. His father, Ignatius Chisolm, was a merchant and slave trader during the 1790s around Knoxville. His mother was a Cherokee woman Hiwassee area. They had three sons before Chisholm left her and moved to Arkansas Territory. Jesse was the oldest of the three sons born to this union. His mother took him to Arkansas after the separation where he lived with Tahlonteskee's group in 1810. Jesse Chisolm moved around the region where he became Indian trader, guide, and interpreter, having learned five or six languages. He was based south of what is now modern Witchita and made the original tracks of the Chisolm trail during his establishment of trading posts. During the war with Mexico he was used by General Sam Houston as a guide and interpreter and during the Civil War he was on the side of the Confederates but by the end of the war he worked with Union Armies. Chisolm was of Scottish Cherokee ancestry and eventually resided in Oklahome with his wife Eliza Edwards who was the daughter of a trading post owner. Chisholm was active in Texas for twenty years before settling in Oklahoma. You can read the whole story about Jesse Chisholm online at the Texas State Historical Association site.

Round Rock

Round Rock Copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Round Rock Copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles

Brushy Creek

The water is up this year on Brushy Creek in Round Rock, Texas. Two years ago during the drought the entire creek bed was visible from the bridge with tiny pools of water here and there. Formerly known as Brushy Creek in 1854, the name of the town was changed when it was moved closer to the railroad that was built farther out from the round rock in 1877. Names were originally derived from the location of the post office so this would have been the Brushy Creek Post Office at the time. During the early migration period, this big round rock was a major landmark that guided many a settler and early native Americans on their travels.

Brushy Creek Waterfall

Copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles

Brushy Creek Falls

This is a lovely shaded area in Old Settlers Park about 300 feet from the famous round rock and The Chisholm Trail crossing. Visitors were swimming in the shallow water. Extended rains offered families the opportunity to enjoy this peaceful bit of water that takes one back in time.

Cattle Drives on the Chisholm Trail

show route and directions
A markerChisholm Trail, Round Rock, Texas -
Chisholm Trail, Round Rock, TX 78681, USA
[get directions]

B markerChisholm Trail, Witchita -
North Chisholm Trail, Clearwater, KS 67026, USA
[get directions]

C markerChisholm Trail New Canadian Oklahoma -
Canadian, OK 74425, USA
[get directions]

The Chisholm Trail

Copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles

Chisholm Trail Park

Harriet"Hattie" Cluck with her son. The man is the picture is 6'7". The figure is large. Copyright July 2010
Harriet"Hattie" Cluck with her son. The man is the picture is 6'7". The figure is large. Copyright July 2010
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
The Bell Steer. copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
The Bell Steer. copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Going To Water.  copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Going To Water. copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles

Chisholm Trail Park Sculptures: Hattie Cluck

Old Settlers Park is a monument to early immigrants who came to Texas on the Chisholm Trail. Harriet Cluck was the first woman to travel to the cattle markets in Kansas the Chisholm Trail. She came with her husband, George Cluck and her three children; seven-year old Allie Annie, five-year-old Emmett, and two-year old Harriett Minnie, who walked and rode the long journey to Abilene, Kansas. Hattie was three months pregnant when she started that long hard journey and she exhibited her courage by loading rifles and supporting the men against attackers. She gave birth to her son, Euell Standifer in Abilene where the family stayed for the winter of 1878-79. The family returned to Williamson County in Running Brushy a name that was later changed to Brushy Creek. Hattie was the postmaster there from 1874 to 1882. Hattie remained in the county until her death in 1938 and is buried on the family farm in Cedar Park.

The Bell Steer

According to Martha Deeringer who wrote, Old Blue: Top Hand on the Trail, in January 2010 in the Texas Co-Op and Power Magazine; the use of the bell steer was first used by Charles Goodnight on his lead steer "Old Blue" during the beginning of the cattle drive era right after the Civil War. Cattle were not worth much in Texas but up north they were going for forty dollars a head. Clearly men with determination and the willingness to work hard could make their living if not their fortune by gathering up the stray longhorn cattle and getting them to the market in the north. This was easier said than done. The cattle liked their lazy ways and it was really hard to get them to move as a heard until Goodnight discovered a natural leader in his heard who wanted to be at the head of the line every time. He hung a bell around his neck and the bell steer was born. Cattle rested at night but invariably moved into the same position every day. This is truly an amazing story of innovation that eased the path of the emerging cattle hands in Texas and the west. Today the bell steers are honored in bronze in Old Settlers Park in Round Rock, Texas for their part in the great cattle drives that restored Texas to financial solvency during those harsh years of Reconstruction after the Civil War.

Round Rock Sites

http://www.roundrockdonuts.com/history/copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
http://www.roundrockdonuts.com/history/copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
The Lone Star Bakery is a  bit of Round Rock history having been in business for over 75 years. People drive for miles to get a taste of the doughnuts made from scratch from the original recipe. copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
The Lone Star Bakery is a bit of Round Rock history having been in business for over 75 years. People drive for miles to get a taste of the doughnuts made from scratch from the original recipe. copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Round Rock water tower is centrally located in the historic district. copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Round Rock water tower is centrally located in the historic district. copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Friar Tuck's Pantry copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Friar Tuck's Pantry copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Louisiana Longhorn Cafe copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Louisiana Longhorn Cafe copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Garcia's Mexican Restaurant the cheapest in Round Rock. copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Garcia's Mexican Restaurant the cheapest in Round Rock. copyright July 2010 Sandra Mireles
Dell Diamond Complex (CC)License Larry D. Moore
Dell Diamond Complex (CC)License Larry D. Moore
Sam Bass tombstone located near the old "Slave Cemetery" section of the Round Rock Cemetery, 1300 block of Sam Bass Rd, Round Rock, Texas (CC)License Larry D. Moore
Sam Bass tombstone located near the old "Slave Cemetery" section of the Round Rock Cemetery, 1300 block of Sam Bass Rd, Round Rock, Texas (CC)License Larry D. Moore

Round Rock is a nice vacation spot located thirty miles from the Texas Hill Country with many lakes and beautiful views. Various lakes and water sports are nearby for the sportsmen and women and is a great spot for family vacations.


Will update this hub with more information later.

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Comments 10 comments

Smireles profile image

Smireles 4 years ago from Texas Author

Thank you KoffeeKlatch Gals and Betty Reid. Sorry it has taken me so long to get back to u. Love Round Rock and Old Settlers Park.


Betty Reid profile image

Betty Reid 5 years ago from Texas

Wow, I did not even know the Chisholm Trail park existed! Great photos. Some of those other places look familiar.


KoffeeKlatch Gals profile image

KoffeeKlatch Gals 6 years ago from Sunny Florida

Beautiful pictures and great history write up. Who could ask for more. Loved the hub.


Smireles profile image

Smireles 6 years ago from Texas Author

Mickey Dee, Sa`ge, and bayoulady, I thank you all for your kind words. My son lives in Austin and I love visiting there. The history of the area is interesting and I never get bored when I am there. Blessings!


bayoulady profile image

bayoulady 6 years ago from Northern Louisiana,USA

Great pictures! My sister has lived in Austin for 23 years. There is so much to do in the area.

Will be watching for the updates!


Sa`ge profile image

Sa`ge 6 years ago from Barefoot Island

I love this hub Smireles, the imagery is wonderful the pictures are beautiful. thank you for all that work you did to get this out to us. ~aloha~


Micky Dee profile image

Micky Dee 6 years ago

You've done a great job here Smireles! This is really beautiful!


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 6 years ago from United States

Smireless, This is a good hub with gorgeous pictures and the history is interesting as well. Thanks, I enjoyed it.


Smireles profile image

Smireles 6 years ago from Texas Author

Thank you, Tom. I am going to add more text but It took so long loading the pictures I will have to work on it again tomorrow. Thanks for reading.


Tom Whitworth profile image

Tom Whitworth 6 years ago from Moundsville, WV

Smireles,

Beautiful pictures and great history of our heritage.

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