Backyard Archaeology: How to Make Your Own Fossil

What would our stuff say about us?

Do you ever wonder what your stuff says about you, or what it would say to future generations? Have you ever wondered what it would be like to make your own fossil slab using items that are associated with the current era? It is a simple, fun project. It's even more fun when shared with a group of young scholars.

Library program inspires young scholars ~

My friend Judy is a children's librarian. She is also an artist. Her ideas and energy around developing projects for children to complete in response to literature are amazing, and very inspiring. My daughter has made a wide range of beautiful pieces with her.

The theme for this summer's reading program at our library is "Dig Into Reading." Judy has found lots of activities to do around digging in the earth. One recent gathering of children involved worm races. Another involved planting and nurturing vegetable plants. The very first one, which she presented at the program kickoff in June, was making your own fossil slab with bones, shells, figurines, sand, and Plaster of Paris.

Fossils made at home are a fun way to learn ~

Fossil slabs made by my daughter and a friend
Fossil slabs made by my daughter and a friend | Source

Materials needed for this project

Vessels
Tools
Ingredients
Big bucket for the sand
Putty knife
Beach sand
Big bucket for mixing Plaster of Paris
Thick-bristled paint brushes
Plaster of Paris carton
Measuring cup for water
Garden hose
Items to impress in sand
*Table created by Seafarer Mama for the purpose of this hub

Photo illustrations for making your own fossils ~

Items you need for your project
Items you need for your project | Source
Items used to make indentations in the sand
Items used to make indentations in the sand | Source
Wet plaster ready for pouring
Wet plaster ready for pouring | Source
Pouring plaster over the surface of the sand
Pouring plaster over the surface of the sand | Source
Brushing the sand away from the slab
Brushing the sand away from the slab
My daughter and her friend with their fossil slabs
My daughter and her friend with their fossil slabs | Source
Page 1 of my daughter's science journal entry
Page 1 of my daughter's science journal entry | Source
Page 2 of my daughter's science journal entry
Page 2 of my daughter's science journal entry | Source

Steps to making your own fossil slab ~

1. Gather items to fossilize

Do you have items around your house that reflect a past age? Are there things from the modern era? Perhaps you will make a slab with some of each.

Past:

dinosaur skeleton

dinosaur figurine

bones

shells

bug toy (such as a dragonfly)


Present:

toy cell phone

toy car

toy bicycle

plastic animal figurine

Doll house clock figurine

Doll house computer figurine


2. Make Indentations in the sand

Step one can be completed at the same time as this step, since the amount of items you can choose is related to their size.

Arrange them across the surface of the sand so that each item has enough space to make a clear impression.

Once the items are arranged on the surface of the sand, push them down as deeply as they will go, then take them out.

3. Mix the Plaster of Paris in a separate bucket

Mix the plaster in a large bowl or bucket, according to the directions provided on the Plaster of Paris carton.

The amount of plaster necessary depends on how many slabs being made at the time.

* The plaster hardens and leftover plaster cannot be reused for a future project, so careful planning is important to make sure the amount made is closely matched with the amount needed.

4. Pour plaster over indented sand

Pour the wet plaster over the surface of the indented sand. Using the putty knife, spread the plaster across the entire surface area so that all of the impressions will be captured and "recorded."

5. Wait 30 to 40 minutes

The amount of time for leaving the plaster to dry, suggested on the carton of plaster powder, was 30 to 40 minutes. You can read about great archaeological finds and enjoy a healthy snack while you wait..

6. Extract fossil slab

When your plaster has dried, carefully turn the container of sand upside down, with your hand underneath to catch the slab. Set it on a stable surface while you extract the fossils from the sand. A patch of grass is perfect for this step.

7. Dig and Brush

Gently dig the top layers of sand away from the slab with your hands. Then brush the rest of the sand away from the fossil forms.

8. Clean

Once you have removed all of the sand that will fall away using your hands and the brush, use a garden hose to wash the rest away. Some of the brown color from the sand will remain on your fossil slab. That will give it a sense of authenticity.

9. Enjoy your fossils!

It's party time! Observe the details in the fossils you have created. Draw all of the items there, and take pictures of everyone holding their treasures. The last 2 pictures reflect the entry my daughter recorded in her science learning journal.

What would you make a fossil with?

Would you make a fossil of your own using historical or modern items

See results without voting

© 2013 Karen Szklany Gault

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Comments 14 comments

MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 3 years ago from South Africa

What a brilliant idea. Can't wait to do this with my grandchildren :)


jhamann profile image

jhamann 3 years ago from Reno NV

I am going to do this with my kids. Thank you. Jamie


hawaiianodysseus profile image

hawaiianodysseus 3 years ago from Southeast Washington state

Excellent crafts and recreation idea! Great way to get the kids or grandkids away from the Play Station and outside somewhere! Thanks for sharing!

~Joe


Seafarer Mama profile image

Seafarer Mama 3 years ago from New England Author

Martie, Jamie, and Joe ~

Thanks for stopping by to let me know you enjoyed reading about this activity. I am so happy that my hub will be useful to you and that you are all excited about doing it with the young people in your lives. Enjoy!

Namaste and Aloha!

Karen


Kathryn Stratford profile image

Kathryn Stratford 3 years ago from Manchester, Connecticut

That is a cool project for kids to do! Thanks for sharing this with us.

Voted up and sharing!

I hope all is well in your world. Have a wonderful day!

~ Kathryn


rose-the planner profile image

rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

This is such a creative idea! I really enjoyed your step by step instructions. Thank you for sharing. (Voted Up) -Rose


Seafarer Mama profile image

Seafarer Mama 3 years ago from New England Author

Thank you, Kathryn! Hope the rest of your summer days are filled with warmth, fun, and walks on the beach. :0)

Karen


Seafarer Mama profile image

Seafarer Mama 3 years ago from New England Author

Thank you for your encouragement and votes, Rose. Glad you enjoyed my step-by-step guide to creating a fossil. ~:0)


Rolly A Chabot profile image

Rolly A Chabot 3 years ago from Alberta Canada

Hi Seafarer Mama... now here is an idea to have some fun with. Love the idea and will be thinking about doing something along this line... sneak one over in the neighbours flowerbed and bury it a little and sit back and watch.... lol

Hugs and Blessings


Seafarer Mama profile image

Seafarer Mama 3 years ago from New England Author

Hey Rolly ~ Thanks for dropping by for a read and for your lovely comments. Hadn't thought about the idea of burying a fossil in a neighbor's flower bed...that would add an extra dimension of fun to the project! ~:0) Thanks for the idea!

Warmest regards to you!


Vinaya Ghimire profile image

Vinaya Ghimire 3 years ago from Nepal

I loved your fossil making idea. Your step by step instructions will surely help people who want to do this.


Seafarer Mama profile image

Seafarer Mama 3 years ago from New England Author

Thank you, Vinaya, for you encouragement. Glad you liked the idea!


billybuc profile image

billybuc 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

What a great program for kids. I would have done this when I was teaching....you wrote this too late. :)

Have a great weekend!


Seafarer Mama profile image

Seafarer Mama 3 years ago from New England Author

Thanks, Bill. Sorry I wrote this too late to be of use to you as a teacher, but it seems like lots of current teachers will find it useful. So good to know when I have put together a hub that will live and breathe for a long time, and thank you for your kind thoughts about it.

Hope you have a great weekend, too.

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