Being a Boy Scout

Oath and Law

Scout Oath (or Promise)

On my honor I will do my best To do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; To help other people at all times; To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight.

Scout Law

A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty,brave, clean, and reverent.

Great Program

Believe it or not, Froggy was a Boy Scout.

I have been suffering from writer's block and then I remembered my days in the Boy Scouts of America. One of the greatest,most memorable programs that I have been a part of.

In my days with the Scouts, I moved from the bottom up. I became Senior patrol leader of our Troop. I was a member of Order of the Arrow {an elite group with-in the Boy Scouts}. I also had the opportunity to carry the United States Flag for an engagement that then Governor of California, Ronald Reagan had in our town. I even shook his hand and didn't wash it for at least a week.

In this hub, I will explain the levels in the B.S.A. I will also give my reasoning behind why I believe it IS such a great program.

Scroll down and learn about the Boy Scouts of America.

Ranks

I will go through every rank in the Scouts. The pictures at the right will be the badges in order top to bottom.

Of course, before the Boy Scouts are the Cub Scouts--I may do a hub later on them.Scouting is about gaining achievements. As you complete these you move up the ladder. Children gain self-confidence by completing these achievements.

The first step is Tenderfoot-that is what you are when you join. To be a Tenderfoot, you must do all these steps:

1. Present yourself to your leader, properly dressed, before going on an overnight camping trip. Show the camping gear you will use. Show the right way to pack and carry it. 2. Spend at least one night on a patrol or troop camp out. Sleep in a tent you have helped pitch. 3. On the camp out, assist in preparing and cooking one of your patrol's meals. Tell why it is important for each patrol member to share in meal preparation and cleanup, and explain the importance of eating together. 4a. Demonstrate how to whip and fuse the ends of a rope. 4b. Demonstrate that you know how to tie the following knots and tell what their uses are: two half hitches and the taut-line hitch. 5. Explain the rules of safe hiking, both on the highway and cross-country, during the day and at night. Explain what to do if you are lost. 6. Demonstrate how to display, raise, lower, and fold the American flag. 7. Repeat from memory and explain in your own words the Scout Oath, Law, motto, and slogan. 8. Know your patrol name, give the patrol yell, and describe your patrol flag. 9. Explain why we use the buddy system in Scouting. 10a. Record your best in the following tests: Push-ups, Pull-ups, Sit-ups, Standing long jump, 1/4-mile walk/run. Record them again 30 days later. 10b. Show improvement in the activities listed in requirement 10a after practicing for 30 days. 11. Identify local poisonous plants; tell how to treat for exposure to them. 12a. Demonstrate the Heimlich maneuver and tell when it is used. 12b. Show first aid for the following:

  • Simple cuts and scratches
  • Blisters on the hand and foot
  • Minor burns or scalds (first-degree)
  • Bites or stings of insects and ticks
  • Venomous snakebite
  • Nosebleed
  • Frostbite and sunburn

13. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath (Promise) and Scout Law in your everyday life. 14. Participate in a Scoutmaster conference. 15. Complete your board of review.

Next is Second-Class. These are requirements for being a Second-Class scout:

1a. Demonstrate how a compass works and how to orient a map. Explain what map symbols mean. 1b. Using a compass and a map together, take a five-mile hike (or 10 miles by bike) approved by your adult leader and your parent or guardian. (Note: If you use a wheelchair or crutches, or if it is difficult for you to get around, you may substitute "trip" for "hike.") 2a. Since joining, have participated in five separate troop/patrol activities (other than troop/patrol meetings), two of which included camping overnight. 2b. On one of these campouts, select your patrol site and sleep in a tent that you pitched. 2c. On one campout, demonstrate proper care, sharpening, and use of the knife, saw, and ax, and describe when they should be used. 2d. Use the tools listed in requirement 2c to prepare tinder, kindling, and fuel for a cooking fire. 2e. Discuss when it is appropriate to use a cooking fire and a lightweight stove. Discuss the safety procedures for using both. 2f. Demonstrate how to light a fire and a lightweight stove. 2g. On one camp out, plan and cook over an open fire one hot breakfast or lunch for yourself, selecting foods from the food pyramid. Explain the importance of good nutrition. Tell how to transport, store, and prepare the foods you selected. 3. Participate in a flag ceremony for your school, religious institution, chartered organization, community, or troop activity. 4. Participate in an approved (minimum of one hour) service project. 5. Identify or show evidence of at least 10 kinds of wild animals (birds, mammals, reptiles, fish, mollusks) found in your community. 6a. Show what to do for "hurry" cases of stopped breathing, serious bleeding, and internal poisoning. 6b. Prepare a personal first-aid kit to take with you on a hike. 6c. Demonstrate first aid for the following:

  • Object in the eye
  • Bite of a suspected rabid animal
  • Puncture wounds from a splinter, nail, and fishhook
  • Serious burns (second-degree)
  • Heat exhaustion
  • Shock
  • Heatstroke, dehydration, hypothermia, and hyperventilation

7a. Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe swim. 7b. Demonstrate your ability to jump feet first into water over your head in depth, level off and swim 25 feet on the surface, stop, turn sharply, resume swimming, then return to your starting place. 7c. Demonstrate water rescue methods by reaching with your arm or leg, by reaching with a suitable object, and by throwing lines and objects. Explain why swimming rescues should not be attempted when a reaching or throwing rescue is possible, and explain why and how a rescue swimmer should avoid contact with the victim. 8. Participate in a school, community, or troop program on the dangers of using drugs, alcohol, and tobacco and other practices that could be harmful to your health. Discuss your participation in the program with your family. 9. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath (Promise) and Scout Law in your everyday life. 10. Participate in a Scoutmaster conference. 11.

Complete your board of review.

The next position is First-Class. These are the requirements for that:

1. Demonstrate how to find directions during the day and at night without using a compass. 2. Using a compass, complete an orienteering course that covers at least one mile and requires measuring the height and/or width of designated items (tree, tower, canyon, ditch, etc.). 3. Since joining, have participated in 10 separate troop/patrol activities (other than troop/patrol meetings), three of which included camping overnight. 4a. Help plan a patrol menu for one camp out that includes at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner, and that requires cooking at least two of the meals. Tell how the menu includes the foods from the food pyramid and meets nutritional needs. 4b. Using the menu planned in requirement 4a, make a list showing the cost and food amounts needed to feed three or more boys and secure the ingredients. 4c. Tell which pans, utensils, and other gear will be needed to cook and serve these meals. 4d. Explain the procedures to follow in the safe handling and storage of fresh meats, dairy products, eggs, vegetables, and other perishable food products. Tell how to properly dispose of camp garbage, cans, plastic containers, and other rubbish. 4e. On one camp out, serve as your patrol's cook. Supervise your assistant(s) in using a stove or building a cooking fire. Prepare the breakfast, lunch, and dinner planned in requirement 4a. Lead your patrol in saying grace at the meals and supervise cleanup. 5. Visit and discuss with a selected individual approved by your leader (elected official, judge, attorney, civil servant,principal, teacher) your constitutional rights and obligations as a U.S. citizen. 6. Identify or show evidence of at least 10 kinds of native plants found in your community. 7a. Discuss when you should and should not use lashings. 7b. Demonstrate tying the timber hitch and clove hitch and their use in square, shear, and diagonal lashings by joining two or more poles or stave's together. 7c. Use lashing to make a useful camp gadget. 8a. Demonstrate tying the bowline knot and describe several ways it can be used. 8b. Demonstrate bandages for a sprained ankle and for injuries on the head, the upper arm, and the collarbone. 8c. Show how to transport by yourself, and with one other person, a person

  • From a smoke-filled room
  • With a sprained ankle, for at least 25 yards

8d. Tell the five most common signs of a heart attack. Explain the steps (procedures) in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). 9a. Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe trip afloat. 9b. Successfully complete the BSA swimmer test. 9c. With a helper and a practice victim, show a line rescue both as tender and as rescuer. (The practice victim should be approximately 30 feet from shore in deep water.) 10. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath (Promise) and Scout Law in your everyday life. 11. Tell someone who is eligible to join Boy Scouts, or an inactive Boy Scout, about your troop's activities. Invite him to a troop outing, activity, service project, or meeting. Tell him how to join, or encourage the inactive Boy Scout to become active. 12. Participate in a Scoutmaster conference. 13.

Complete your board of review.

Alternate

For those children not able because of disabilities or other problem who cannot complete the steps for Tenderfoot up to First-Class there is an alternate way. These are the steps for them:

  1. The physical or mental disability must be of a permanent rather than a temporary nature.
  2. A clear and concise medical statement concerning the Scout's disabilities must be submitted by a physician licensed to practice medicine. In the alternative, an evaluation statement certified by an educational administrator may be submitted. The medical statement must state the doctor's opinion that the Scout cannot complete the requirement(s) because of a permanent disability.
  3. The Scout, his parents, or leaders must submit to the council advancement committee, a written request that the Scout be allowed to complete alternate requirements for Tenderfoot, Second Class, or First Class rank. The request must explain the suggested alternate requirements in sufficient detail so as to allow the advancement committee to make a decision. The request must also include the medical statement required in paragraph two above. The written request for alternate requirements must be submitted to and approved by the local council prior to completing alternate requirements.
  4. The Scout must complete as many of the regular requirements as his ability permits before applying for alternate requirements.
  5. The alternate requirements must be of such a nature that they are as demanding of effort as the regular requirements.
  6. When alternate requirements involve physical activity, they must be approved by the physician.
  7. The unit leader and any board of review must explain that to attain Tenderfoot, Second Class, or First Class rank a candidate is expected to do his best in developing himself to the limit of his resources.
  8. The written request must be approved by the council advancement committee, utilizing the expertise of professional persons involved in Scouting for disabled youth. The decision of the council advancement committee should be recorded and delivered to the Scout and his leader.

After First-Class you then have Star Scout. Here are the requirements for being a Star Scout:

1. Be active in your troop and patrol for at least four months as a First Class Scout. 2. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath (Promise) and Scout Law in your everyday life. 3. Earn six merit badges, including any four from the required list for Eagle. (See the Eagle Rank Requirements, number 3, for this list.) A Scout may choose any of the 15 required merit badges in the 12 categories to fulfill this requirement. 4. While a First Class Scout, take part in service projects totaling at least six hours of work. These projects must be approved by your Scoutmaster. 5. While a First Class Scout, serve actively for four months in one or more of the following positions of responsibility (or carry out a Scoutmaster-assigned leadership project to help the troop):

  • Boy Scout troop. Patrol leader, assistant senior patrol leader, senior patrol leader, troop guide, Order of the Arrow troop representative, den chief, scribe, librarian, historian, quartermaster, bugler, junior assistant Scoutmaster, chaplain aide, or instructor.
  • Varsity Scout team. Captain, cocaptain, program manager, squad leader, team secretary, Order of the Arrow troop representative, librarian, historian, quartermaster, chaplain aide, instructor, or den chief.
  • Venturing crew/ship. President, vice president, secretary, treasurer, boatswain, boatswain's mate, yeoman, purser, or storekeeper.

6. Take part in a Scoutmaster conference. 7. Complete your board of review.

After Star is Life Scout. Here is how you become a Life Scout:

1. Be active in your troop and patrol for at least six months as a Star Scout. 2. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath (Promise) and Scout Law in your everyday life. 3. Earn five more merit badges (so that you have 11 in all), including any three more from the required list for Eagle. (See the Eagle Rank Requirements, number 3, for this list.) A Scout may choose any of the 15 required merit badges in the 12 categories to fulfill this requirement. 4. While a Star Scout, take part in service projects totaling at least six hours of work. These projects must be approved by your Scoutmaster. 5. While a Star Scout, serve actively for six months in one or more of the troop positions of responsibility listed in requirement 5 for Star Scout (or carry out a Scoutmaster-assigned leadership project to help the troop). 6. Take part in a Scoutmaster conference. 7. Complete your board of review.

Last and highest rank is Eagle Scout. A great feat for any boy to reach. I will put the requirements and below the alternate requirements:

Eagle Rank Requirements

1. Be active in your troop, team, crew, or ship for a period of at least six months after you have achieved the rank of Life Scout. 2. Demonstrate that you live by the principles of the Scout Oath and Law in your daily life. List the names of individuals who know you personally and would be willing to provide a recommendation on your behalf, including parents/guardians, religious, educational, and employer references. 3. Earn a total of 21 merit badges (10 more than you already have), including the following:

  1. First Aid
  2. Citizenship in the Community
  3. Citizenship in the Nation
  4. Citizenship in the World
  5. Communications
  6. Personal Fitness
  7. Emergency Preparedness OR Lifesaving
  8. Environmental Science
  9. Personal Management
  10. Swimming OR Hiking OR Cycling
  11. Camping
  12. Family Life

You must choose only one merit badge listed in items g and j. If you have earned more than one of the badges listed in items g and j, choose one and list the remaining badges to make your total of 21. 4. While a Life Scout, serve actively for a period of six months in one or more of the following positions of responsibility:

  • Boy Scout troop. Patrol leader, assistant senior patrol leader, �senior patrol leader, troop guide, Order of the Arrow troop representative, den chief, scribe, librarian, historian, quartermaster, junior assistant Scoutmaster, chaplain aide, or instructor.
  • Varsity Scout team. Captain, cocaptain, program manager, squad leader, team secretary, Order of the Arrow team representative, librarian, quartermaster, chaplain aide, instructor, or den chief.
  • Venturing crew/ship. President, vice president, secretary, treasurer, boatswain, boatswain's mate, yeoman, purser, or storekeeper.

5. While a Life Scout, plan, develop, and give leadership to others in a service project helpful to any religious institution, any school, or your community. (The project should benefit an organization other than Boy Scouting.) The project plan must be approved by the organization benefiting from the effort, your Scoutmaster and troop committee, and the council or district before you start. You must use the Eagle Scout Leadership Service Project Workbook, BSA publication No. 18-927, in meeting this requirement. 6. Take part in a Scoutmaster conference. 7. Successfully complete an Eagle Scout board of review.

Alternate Requirements: Eagle Scout Rank

  1. The Eagle Scout rank may be achieved by a Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or qualified Venturer who has a physical or mental disability by qualifying for alternate merit badges. This does not apply to individual requirements for merit badges. Merit badges are awarded only when all requirements are met as stated.
  2. The physical or mental disability must be of a permanent rather than a temporary nature.
  3. A clear and concise medical statement concerning the Scout's disabilities must be made by a physician licensed to practice medicine, or an evaluation statement must be certified by an educational administrator.
  4. The candidate must earn as many of the required merit badges as his ability permits before applying for an alternate Eagle Scout rank merit badge.
  5. The candidate must complete as many of the requirements of the required merit badges as his ability permits.
  6. The Application for Alternate Eagle Scout Award Merit Badges, No. 58-730, must be completed prior to qualifying for alternate merit badges.
  7. The alternate merit badges chosen must be of such a nature that they are as demanding of effort as the required merit badges.
  8. When alternates chosen involve physical activity, they must be approved by the physician.
  9. The unit leader and the board of review must explain that to attain the Eagle Scout rank a candidate is expected to do his best in developing himself to the limit of his resources.
  10. The application must be approved by the council committee responsible for advancement, utilizing the expertise of professional persons involved in Scouting for the disabled.
  11. The candidate's application for Eagle must be made on the Eagle Scout Rank Application, with the Application for Alternate Eagle Scout Award Merit Badges attached.

Boy Scouting is a great program. Many of the things I learned there has helped me through life.

I would recommend the Boy Scouts for all young boys.

I ran across this you tube video--As I said earlier, I was a member of Order of the Arrow--you will see a scout dressed in an Indian outfit dancing with a torch--which is me years ago dancing at a Jamboree for the Governor of Iowa. Didn't realize I made You-Tube.

© 2008 Greg Boudonck

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Comments 11 comments

rodney southern profile image

rodney southern 8 years ago from Greensboro, NC

Great hub about a great program. Wonderful job!


Froggy213 profile image

Froggy213 8 years ago from On A Mountain In Puerto Rico Author

Thank you Rodney


Rob Jundt profile image

Rob Jundt 8 years ago from Midwest USA

Oh the Boy Scouts. Many a day were spent on hiking, canoeing, camping, and various other adventures. I loved the entire scouting program, but the Boy Scouts is the bomb. -- Summer camp, rapelling, spelunking, knots, fires, cooking over fires, building fires, thinking about fires... Oh the memories. :)


compu-smart profile image

compu-smart 8 years ago from London UK

Wow!! you put a lot of work here Froggy,

In was in the cubs for 4 weeks untill i got kicked out, but i did learn two things, and that was learning how to make excellent knots and "be prepared"!!

good job!


stephhicks68 profile image

stephhicks68 8 years ago from Bend, Oregon

Hi Froggy, I am a den leader for cub scouts (Webelos about to cross over into Boy Scouts). I give you a big thumbs up for putting this together! I will email to our Committee Chair for consideration and distribution to scouts considering Boy Scouts.


Froggy213 profile image

Froggy213 8 years ago from On A Mountain In Puerto Rico Author

Thank you stephhicks for being a part of Scouting--I was a Webelo also.It is a great program!!


rmr profile image

rmr 8 years ago from Livonia, MI

Thumbs up, Froggy! Aside from parenting, scouting was the most rewarding thing I have ever done. Many friends and memories!


goldenpath profile image

goldenpath 6 years ago from Shenandoah, Iowa, USA

Great organization on the hub! Scouting, if the one is committed, will prove a great asset and benefit in all life's endeavors.


 5 years ago

Great hub with perfect picture presentation.

http://hubpages.com/sports/Washington-Summer-Compu...


mom 5 years ago

how much does it cost to join boy scouts?


Froggy213 profile image

Froggy213 5 years ago from On A Mountain In Puerto Rico Author

As far as I know there is no cost in joining, just for equipment and uniforms. I suggest checking with your local troop.

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