Birds That Are Endangered

The Kagu

By Scott Meyer (web site of Scott Meyer) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
By Scott Meyer (web site of Scott Meyer) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons | Source

The Kagu from New Caledonia

You will only find the Kagu living in the Pacific Ocean on the island of New Caledonia. They make their home in rain forests but they will also live in drier forests. The Kagu will find a spot on the ground that is sheltered by rocks to build their home They will also use holes in dirt banks.

The Kagu has feathers that are pearl-gray and their legs and bill are bright orange. Their feathers are cleaned and waterproofed by a powder down. Their eyes are red. They have a crest on their head and stripes on their wing tips. The Kagu is large and will rarely fly.

They will look for food in the daylight hours. They will dig for food in the leaf litter or rocks. They like to eat larvae, spiders, centipedes, snails, lizards, and most kinds of worms.


By Pierre Fidenci [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
By Pierre Fidenci [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons | Source

The Kagu never had to fly because they had no natural enemies on New Caledonia. In the 18th century, Captain Cook discovered New Caledonia and everything changed for the Kagu. Settlers came from Europe and they brought dogs and pig with them. The dogs attacked the Kagu and the pigs ate the Kagu's eggs.

The Kagu almost became extinct because nickel was discovered on New Caledonia. In order to mine the nickel they had to cut down the forests and the Kagu lost their safe home.

There are sanctuaries being set ;up to save the Kagu. The Kagu is raised in captivity and then returned to the wild. The process is slow because the Kagu only lays one egg a year.



The Swan Goose

By Shizhao (Own work) [CC BY-SA 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons
By Shizhao (Own work) [CC BY-SA 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons | Source

The Swan Goose will be found living in East Asia. They spend the breeding season in Northern China and Sakhalin and they will migrate to eastern China and the Korean Peninsula for the winter.

The Swan Goose will be 87cm long and they have a 153cm wingspan. They usually weigh around 3.2kg. They have a very long neck like a swan. The back of their neck is dark brown. They have a cream color on the front of their neck.

The Swan Goose's main diet consists of grass, roots, stems, and seeds. Domesticated Swan Geese are sometimes used to weed farmland. Many people raise the Swan goose for its eggs.

The Swan Goose is endangered. At one time the Swan Goose would also spend their winters in Japan, but now they are rarely found there. They were hunted until they were all gone.

They are losing habitat because their breeding and wintering areas are being converted to farmland.

They now have very few places left where they can live.


The White-headed Duck

By Ian13 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL
By Ian13 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL

There were more than 100.000 White-headed ducks at the beginning of the 20th century and now they are on the verge of extinction. Their winter home has become polluted so they no longer have a place to spend the winter. The White-headed duck is a migratory bird and they would spend the winters on lakes and ponds in warm climates. They are losing their habitat because the lakes and ponds are being polluted and they are no longer suitable

They are more dependent on water than most duck species. The White-headed duck will molt during breeding time and in the winter. When they are molting they are ;unable to fly. They are in danger of being attacked by predators. The marshes and wetlands are being drained for agriculture and pasture land. They are in danger of becoming extinct.

The White-headed male duck is 48cm long and weigh 553 to 865g. They have a wingspan that is 62 to 70cm. The male White-headed duck has a head and back of its neck that are white. Their body is light brown.

They eat insect larvae and lug worms. They also eat aquatic plants.


Two Hawaiian geese on Pali Trail between Māʻalaea and Lāhainā

By Waimoku at en.wikipedia (Transferred from en.wikipedia by SreeBot) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
By Waimoku at en.wikipedia (Transferred from en.wikipedia by SreeBot) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons | Source

The Hawaiian Goose is also known as the Nene. They are 56 to 71cm long. The Hawaiian Goose's habitat does not have much water on it so their feet are small and webbed. Their habitat is rocky so they have long legs and their toes are large so they can walk over the rocks without having a problem. The Hawaiian Goose' face and crown are black, and their checks are cream colored. They have a gray streaked with black neck. They have gray-brown wings, and body They have black feet, legs, and bill.


Nene Gosling In Kauai

By DickDaniels (http://carolinabirds.org/) (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons
By DickDaniels (http://carolinabirds.org/) (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons | Source

You will find the Hawaiian Goose on Maui, Hawaii, Kauai, and nowhere else in the wild.

Group of Hawaiian geese on the golf course

BY-SA 4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
BY-SA 4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons | Source

The Hawaiian Goose likes to eat plant leaves and grass. They will sometimes eat fruit.



Two Hawaiian geese at the Kīlauea Point National Wildlife Refuge.

By No machine-readable author provided. Caracas1830 assumed (based on copyright claims). [CC BY-SA 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons 800px-Nene,_Kauai.JPG
By No machine-readable author provided. Caracas1830 assumed (based on copyright claims). [CC BY-SA 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons 800px-Nene,_Kauai.JPG | Source

Before the 19th century the Hawaiian Goose was plentiful. When the settlers started coming to the Hawaiian Island the Hawaiian Gooses numbers started dropping. This was because the settlers brought mongooses, and cats with them and they attacked the Hawaiian Goose. The settlers also hunted the geese for food. In 1949 it was estimated there were only 30 Hawaiian Geese left. They are considered the worlds rarest goose.




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Comments 6 comments

Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 2 months ago from The Beautiful South

Some real beauties, especially the second one! Great job well done. Sharing.


norlawrence profile image

norlawrence 2 months ago from California Author

They are beautiful. Thanks


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 2 months ago from USA

It's so sad many of these birds are losing their habitats. There are too many of us humans encroaching on their land.


norlawrence profile image

norlawrence 2 months ago from California Author

It is sad. Thanks for your comment. Appreciate it.


BlossomSB profile image

BlossomSB 2 months ago from Victoria, Australia

Lovely images and great information. I've just returned from a holiday on Phillip Island. It's spring here and we saw so many baby birds, especially when we walked to Swan Lake and sat in the hides there - Swans and cygnets, ducks and ducklings - including chestnut teal ducks. On the way in we stood stock still as we watched a swamp wallaby and a stripy Cape Barren gosling eying each other - only a couple of metres away from us. Sadly, no photos as my camera was on the blink.


norlawrence profile image

norlawrence 2 months ago from California Author

Thanks for comment and information. Sounds like you had a great holiday.

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