Botticelli- Renaissance Art

BOTTICELLI AS A YOUNG MAN (SELF PORTRAIT)
BOTTICELLI AS A YOUNG MAN (SELF PORTRAIT)
PROABALE SELF-PORTRAIT FOUND IN THE "ADORATION OF THE MAGI." (1475-1476)
PROABALE SELF-PORTRAIT FOUND IN THE "ADORATION OF THE MAGI." (1475-1476)

Sandro Botticelli

Alessandro Filipepi was born in 1445; the perfect time to be an artist. For the first time in hundreds of years, writers, poets, sculptors and painters were once again admired and respected. Culture was returning, and young Allessandro had the opportunity to spend an inordinate amount of time with the artists who frequented his brother's workshop. Botticello, Allessandro's older brother was a gold pounder. He "pounded" gold onto picture frames, and he added gold to the paintings of others (halos and angel wings). His younger brother watched, learned, and then began his own experimentation in the world of art.

As a young teenager, Allesandro was sent to apprentice in the workshop of the master painter, Filippo Lippi. It was there that he assisted Florence's greatest artist, and in turn, learned to mix colors, clean brushes, and prepare walls (frescos) for painting. He learned to draw; he learned to paint, and through the imitation of his teacher he found his own niche. His paintings evolved from looking very similar to Lippi's own, to becoming the paintings of someone who'd earned both his own name and his own glory; Allessandro Filipepi became Sandro Botticelli.

Botticelli's Fortitude

ONE OF THE FIRST PAINTINGS BOTTICELLI WAS ACTUALLY PAID FOR
ONE OF THE FIRST PAINTINGS BOTTICELLI WAS ACTUALLY PAID FOR

THE PAINTINGS OF SANDRO BOTTICELLI

The Virgin and Child with Five Angels
The Virgin and Child with Five Angels
Inferno XVIII
Inferno XVIII
Young Girl
Young Girl
Venus
Venus

THE YOUNG ARTIST

The Renaissance was a time of discovery and exploration, and Botticelli's time in the Lippi's workshop allowed him the chance to do both; he explored, and through that exploration he discovered. Influenced greatly by his teacher, Botticelli's initial artwork mirrored his master's. The colors, pale and muted; the meticulous flow of a garment; the faces full of life and beauty. All of these techniques were similar to Lippi's, but as time went on they became his own; he became an individual, and he became a true artist.

There were many artists in Florence, and Botticelli studied and learned from each of them. He was surrounded by greatness, and he spent hours earning his own. At the age of twenty-five Botticelli completed one of the first paintings that he was actually paid for, a panel that would reside in a meeting room frequented by the most important men in Florence; the painting was called Fortitude. Before long, Botticelli became Florence's favorite artist; he had no equal in his talent for mixing colors; he is in fact, one of the greatest colorists of all time. He was also a master of the rythmic line, using his paintbrush to outline the figures in his paintings. In doing this he used his paintbrush in the way we would use a pen or a pencil, and he believed these lines added a feeling of fluidity and movement.

Lorenzo de Medici was one of Botticelli's most famous and wealthiest patrons. Medici showed great interest in the artist and encouraged his friends to do the same. Because of Medici's patronage Botticelli had more work than he could handle, and it wasn't long before he found himself hiring other artists to help him keep up with the demand. His assistants not only helped put on the finishing touches, but would sometimes make copies of them as well. Unfortunately, some of his assistants took their copying a bit further than they should have by copying and selling Botticelli's work without his permission. Today, even experts find it hard to tell Botticelli's originals from the forgeries; he must have been an excellent teacher.

Botticelli separated himself from his peers in that his art took on what he imagined to be "ideal." Other painters of the Renaissance looked to the ancient Greek and Romans for inspiration. They studied science, nature, and the human body so that their paintings and sculptures would be as realistic as possible. Rafael, Leonardo, and Michelangelo used perspective in their paintings, something that gave their artwork a three dimensional feel. Botticelli had no use for perspective, and he placed his own focus on that special kind of beauty seen through the imagination; it was the beauty of fantasy. His work may at times seem flat, and his portrayals may sometimes not seem quite as realistic as the next master, but a master he was, and his paintings are indeed beautiful.




The Adoration of the Magi

Religion

During the Renaissance, rulers and families of importance like to show off their wealth through their possessions, their homes, their clothes and the people they chose to associate with. Sometimes, families even competed with each other to be the patrons of the best painters, architects, and sculptors of the time. Ironically, it seems that some things never change.

Most Renaissance art depicts religious scenes, stories from the Bible, and other Christian ideas. Botticelli created many religious paintings for the churches in Florence, and for other Italian cities as well. Ironically, the paintings are sometimes as much about the patrons of the artist, as they are the scene they depict. Look closely at the Adoration of the Magi; the painting's focus is the newborn baby Jesus, and we can see that he and his mother Mary are surrounded by visitors, but what we wouldn't know is that most of all of the visitors are in fact Lorenzo di Medici's family members. The importance and power of the family are shown in the midst of a religious theme, and anyone who'd seen the painting at that time would see that power and know it for what it was. Botticelli, he finds his way into the far right hand corner; we glimpse the man while he gazes at us..........


PRIMAVERA
PRIMAVERA
BIRTH OF VENUS
BIRTH OF VENUS

Mythology

Botticelli was also well known for his paintings of mythological creatures, gods from the ancient Roman and Greek cultures; he loved depicting the fantastical images of the otherworld, and the people of the Renaissance were interested in the stories he had to tell. The paintings Primavera and the Birth of Venus are the perfect example his lighter side; they're like poetry, just sit back and enjoy.......... Primavera belongs to Venus, the goddess of love as she celebrates the coming of spring with Cupid and the host of nymphs and gods that surround them. The Birth of Venus once again finds what seem to be Botticelli's favorite goddess balanced on the tip of a seashell as she's blown towards the shore; the other characters in the painting seem to be floating as they help her along on her way, seeing her safely to wherever it is she wants to be.

THE YOUTH OF MOSES
THE YOUTH OF MOSES
TEMPTATION OF CHRIST
TEMPTATION OF CHRIST

The Sistine Chapel

Botticelli was a Florentine, and the love he had for his home can be seen in the fact that in all of his life he only left the city of Florence once to visit Rome. His stay was brief, but what he accomplished while there was history.

In 1481, Botticelli traveled to Rome at the request of Pope Sixtus IV, and it was there he joined a number of other Florentine and Umbrian artists who'd been summoned to fresco the walls of the Sistine Chapel. Botticelli was denied any input as to the content of his artwork, but before leaving the Vatican a year later he had completed three major frescoes; The Youth of Moses, the Punishment of the Sons of Corah, and the Temptation of Christ. Aside from these three very important works, Botticelli also completed at least seven papal portraits which were hung in what was called the "window zone."

Dominican Priest Savonarola
Dominican Priest Savonarola

THE LATER YEARS

During Botticelli's lifetime he created a multitude of religious paintings, but as I've already stated, there was a part of his artistry that leaned towards tales of mythology, and the mysteries of the imagination. In the 1490's, things in Florence changed and so did Botticelli.

In his later years, Botticelli became a follower of the Dominican Priest Savonarola, and the priest's influence transformed his life. Savonarola vehemently preached against the corruption of the clergy, encouraged book burning, and destroyed what he considered immoral paintings. He became a leader in Florence, preaching against worldliness and excess. Botticelli embraced Savonarola, his teachings, and his beliefs to the extent that the burned many of his own paintings disgusted by their pagan themes. For awhile, he focused only on religion and the way he could glorify the creator through his art, but unfortunately, the time would come when he deserted his painting altogether.

Botticelli died in 1510, at the age of 65, but he lives on through the legacy he left behind; it's quite a legacy.

THE CRUCIFIXION

Re-Discovery

Botticelli's paintings were forgotten for hundreds of years before they were re-discovered during the late 1800's. Today, the newfound interest in his work has given us a beauty we'd never have seen without the intricate removal of dirt and extensive cleaning that his paintings have endured. How many artists have been forgotten, and how many have never been heard of? Botticelli, he may have been forgotten once, but I doubt he'll ever be forgotten again. I, for one, am glad he's back!

More by this Author

  • Francisco Goya
    30

    Francisco Goya - Self Portrait Francisco de Goya was born in Fuendetodos, a small village in Northern Spain on March 30, 1746. At the time of his birth, Spain was not the wealthy country it had been in the past; its...

  • Leonardo da Vinci- The Genius
    55

    Leonardo da Vinci was born April 15,1452. Although, he was the illegitimate son of a rich lawyer, Leonardo spent the first five years of his life living with his mother....... a peasant. Leonardo's talents were many,...

  • Jack London- A Piece of Steak- Summary
    36

    This isn't the first time Jack London has been the "featured author" at our book club; he's been here before, and because the students appreciate his work........... he's back again. A Piece of Steak, was...


Comments 28 comments

habee profile image

habee 6 years ago from Georgia

I love his Birth of Venus! Thank goodness for the Medicis of the art world!


breakfastpop profile image

breakfastpop 6 years ago

His work is magnificent and so is your beautiful hub.


Kaie Arwen profile image

Kaie Arwen 6 years ago Author

habee- You can say that again......... people may not always have appreciated the family's politics, but their contribution to the arts is unquestionable. Think of all the masters they supported through their patronage; it's ineffable!

Thank you!

Kaie


Kaie Arwen profile image

Kaie Arwen 6 years ago Author

breakfastpop--- His work is magnificent; I had a lot of fun with this hub! Happy you stopped by........... as always! :-D

Kaie


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 6 years ago from Chicago

This article—and the gallery—is fantastic. I learned many new things by reading it. I must thank you profusely for providing your own piece of art for the world to behold.


Kaie Arwen profile image

Kaie Arwen 6 years ago Author

James- There's nothing I enjoy more than adding to the information you already have stored and filed in that amazing brain of yours! ;-) Thank you, and may I say that you are very welcome............

Kaie


katyzzz profile image

katyzzz 6 years ago from Sydney, Australia

What great art is born from religion and mythology, this is a great hub, an interesting lesson, with some great art pictures.

Well done.


Kaie Arwen profile image

Kaie Arwen 6 years ago Author

katyzzz- Thank you. I think Botticelli gained immense inspiration from both religion and mythology, but think it sad that he later thought it necessary to burn many of the paintings he came to believe promoted paganism.

It was nice to see you here, and thanks again,

Kaie


"Quill" 6 years ago

A piece of artwork in itself this hub is... well done and a new appreciation for the incredible collection of masters you have brought here for us all.

Blessings


Kaie Arwen profile image

Kaie Arwen 6 years ago Author

Quill- If you've discovered a new appreciation for the artists of the Renaissance; I have indeed accomplished what I set out to accomplish. Beauty is everywhere, but you already know that :-D

I always find s feeling of serenity after reading your Hubs. and I have to say I'm honored that you enjoy mine..........

Thank you,

Kaie


sarovai profile image

sarovai 6 years ago

Realistic look in these painting. Thank u for reminding the great painter.


Kaie Arwen profile image

Kaie Arwen 6 years ago Author

sarovai- They are realistic, and I am happy to have reminded you. Glad you stopped by!

Kaie


PaulieWalnuts profile image

PaulieWalnuts 6 years ago from Chicago

Beautiful Hub! Wouldn't it be grand if today artists of all kind were treated with respect as they were in the Renaissance? Ahhh, a romantic notion I guess. "The Birth of Venus" is so beautiful, the city of Venice, also beautiful, (Venezia) means Venus in Italian. I was there in Florence posing under that painting for a photo, it was a dream come true.


Kaie Arwen profile image

Kaie Arwen 6 years ago Author

PaulieWalnuts- Dream come true!?! I think it was probably even a bit better than that!

Yes, I agree............. all artists should have that kind of respect. Romantic? Maybe............ but if that kind of respect existed.......... it's still there somewhere! Thank you for stopping by!

Kaie


Kendall H. profile image

Kendall H. 6 years ago from Northern CA

Botticelli is undeniably a genius. I remember after going to an exhibit as a little girl I wanted to dress like a Botticelli girl for Halloween. So my mom and I found a lovely romantic dress and strung flowers through my hair. :) I still remember the strange looks I got from my classmates. Anyway I love your hub series on artists! You show classic examples of works and explain more than simple facts of life.


Kaie Arwen profile image

Kaie Arwen 6 years ago Author

Kendall H.- Yes, Botticelli was a genius! What a great story, and what a great Halloween costume............ I thinks those strange looks were more than likely jealousy........... what little girl doesn't dream of the romantic dress, or better yet, flowers in her hair? On the other hand........... it wouldn't just be the little girls would it? Thanks for stopping by.........

Kaie


hypnodude profile image

hypnodude 6 years ago from Italy

Another great artistic hub Kaie, with wonderful pics. Rated up and beautiful, plus stumbled. :)


Kaie Arwen profile image

Kaie Arwen 6 years ago Author

hypnodude- why thank you! I know you're not entirely crazy about the art Hubs; so I think that maybe it was Botticelli that got you! Glad you were here!

Kaie


epigramman profile image

epigramman 6 years ago

I feel like a 'werewolf' for your hubs - I am always howling for more!

And they're a feast for the eyes too - in particular this one!!!


Kaie Arwen profile image

Kaie Arwen 6 years ago Author

epigramman- Boticelli's work is indeed a feast for the eyes.............. Kaie


billyaustindillon profile image

billyaustindillon 6 years ago

This hub has reflecting his life and beautiful work superbly. Venus and her hair are one of art's treasures. This makes me want to take a trip to Venice and Florence.


Kaie Arwen profile image

Kaie Arwen 6 years ago Author

billyaustindillon- Thank you! My favorite of the photos is the close-up of Venus' face and the photo of the young girl. He truly captured the essence of Venus from the inside out! That's a trip you should take! Kaie


GmaGoldie profile image

GmaGoldie 6 years ago from Madison, Wisconsin

I have always loved Botticelli - what a great write-up for a great artist.

I had no idea his works were lost up until the 1800's - fascinating how things change. Were they simply just out of favor? So many great pieces of art need cheerleaders. The Faberge eggs had no value until Armand Hammer explained the workmanship. The colors are stated to be almost impossible to replicate and if you study the eggs and view the replicas you can see that.

Love sharing great art - so inspiring. Thank you very much!


Kaie Arwen profile image

Kaie Arwen 6 years ago Author

GmaGoldie- I too love Botticelli- he is one of the few artists that I've never found myself critiquing. I'm one of those people who often doesn't take in the painting as an entirety, you might say I appreciate one section at a time before stepping back to really look.

Maybe that's why I gravitate towards sculpture............ it's something that amazes me, and I can never find anything wrong with it! ;-)

Happy to share- Kaie


SilkThimble profile image

SilkThimble 4 years ago from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Really interesting article. I so love Botticelli's work, and I definitely learned some new things about his life.


Kaie Arwen profile image

Kaie Arwen 4 years ago Author

Silk Thimble- Thank you- I'm glad you found it interesting and learned something new. I definitely learned a few things in the writing! He was truly gifted............ Kaie


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 4 years ago from Taos, NM

I love Italian Renaissance art. This article is beautiful and so informative. And the paintings by Botticelli you included here are wonderful. Thanks for sharing you knowledge with us!


anonymous 3 years ago

Hello! baeakac interesting baeakac site! I'm really like it! Very, very baeakac good!

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working