Brain Freezes, Knuckle Cracking and Ear Wiggles: Strange Biology

Very cold ice cream can cause a brain freeze or ice cream headache.
Very cold ice cream can cause a brain freeze or ice cream headache. | Source

Strange and Interesting Behavior

The human body is complex and awe-inspiring. It also exhibits some strange behaviors that make some of us scratch our head and wonder what the heck is going on.

One of these weird activities is the creation of a "brain freeze", a sudden, sharp headache that some people experience as they eat very cold food, such as ice cream. Others are the knuckle cracking and ear wiggling that some folks perform either for their own enjoyment or to impress people who lack the ability.

I experience brain freezes myself and admire the knuckle cracks and ear wiggles of others. Strange as it may seem to people who consider these to be interesting but unimportant phenomena, they may be valuable. Learning more about strange activities in the body may help scientists understand related behaviors that are more serious in nature.

Drinking an ice-cold cola on a hot day can trigger a brain freeze.
Drinking an ice-cold cola on a hot day can trigger a brain freeze. | Source

Cold Food and Drinks and Brain Freezes

A brain freeze occurs when a person eats or drinks something very cold very quickly. Common triggers are ice cream and ice-cold beverages. The disorder is sometimes known as an ice cream headache.

The technical name for a brain freeze is sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia, which somehow lacks the impact of the common name. The sharp, stabbing headache develops almost immediately after taking a cold substance into the mouth. The pain lasts from as little as ten seconds to as long as five minutes.

Many people experience brain freezes, but they occur more commonly in migraine sufferers than in people who don't experience migraines. Discovering the cause or causes of brain freezes may enable researchers to discover new treatments for headache disorders.

A brain freeze is believed to be triggered when something very cold touches the palate, or roof of the mouth.
A brain freeze is believed to be triggered when something very cold touches the palate, or roof of the mouth. | Source

Relieving or Avoiding the Pain

My brain freezes don't last long, so I just endure the headaches until they disappear. People who experience a brain freeze headache for a longer time might want to try one of the suggested treatments. I have no experience with these, but some sufferers say they work. Eating warm food to heat up the palate or placing the tongue against the palate reportedly work for some people. Eating cold food slowly and in very small mouthfuls may prevent a brain freeze in susceptible people who simply can't resist an icy treat.

The Circle of Willis

The anterior cerebral arteries form part a structure known as the Circle of Willis on the undersurface of the brain. (The vessels at the top of the diagram are positioned closer to the front of the brain's undersurface.)
The anterior cerebral arteries form part a structure known as the Circle of Willis on the undersurface of the brain. (The vessels at the top of the diagram are positioned closer to the front of the brain's undersurface.) | Source

The circle of Willis is named after Thomas Willis, an English physician who lived from 1621 to 1675. He is officially recognized as the first person to notice the circle of arteries on the undersurface of the brain.

The Anterior Cerebral Arteries

There are two main theories to explain the production of a brain freeze. Either one may be correct, or alternatively they may both be correct. The most recent theory involves changes in blood flow in a brain artery, which in turn affects nerves and causes pain.

The artery that is believed to be affected by the cold temperature is the anterior cerebral artery. This artery begins on the undersurface of the brain as a branch from another artery and then enters the brain to supply it with blood.

Although the term "anterior cerebral artery" is often used in the singular, there are actually two of these arteries, as shown in the diagram below. One originates on each side of the brain. The two arteries enter the brain together through the fissure, or groove, that separates the right side of the brain from the left side.

What Causes a Brain Freeze?

The Anterior Cerebral Artery and Brain Freezes

When cold food or drink reaches the palate on the roof of the mouth, the sudden decrease in temperature is thought to affect blood flow in the anterior cerebral artery. The artery rapidly dilates, or expands, presumably enabling more warm blood to enter the brain to protect it from the cold. The dilated artery likely puts pressure on nerves present on the surface of the brain, causing pain. (The brain itself doesn't feel pain.)

The flow of extra blood into the relatively closed structure of the brain could raise blood pressure. The dilation of the anterior cerebral artery is quickly followed by its constriction, which presumably protects the brain from continued high blood pressure and eliminates the pain.

One group of researchers has found some interesting evidence suggesting that the above theory may be correct. The scientists have shown that the dilation of the anterior cerebral artery in human volunteers coincides with the pain of a brain freeze headache. The constriction of the artery that follows the dilation corresponds with the disappearance of the headache. More research is needed to prove that the arterial changes are the cause of the brain freeze headache instead of the result, however.

Branches of the Trigeminal Nerve

The trigeminal nerve and its branches through the face
The trigeminal nerve and its branches through the face | Source

Brain Freezes and the Trigeminal Nerve

An older theory for the cause of a brain freeze says that the trigeminal nerve is responsible for the pain. The trigeminal nerve is one of the cranial nerves transferring information to and from the brain. The nerve has branches that extend into the face, as shown by the yellow lines in the diagram on the above. Like the anterior cerebral arteries, the cranial nerves are paired, so there is a trigeminal nerve on each side of the body.

According to the trigeminal nerve theory for brain freezes, the initial stimulus for the headache is the cold food or drink touching the palate. The low temperature triggers nerves in the area to stimulate blood vessels to dilate. The dilation enables the vessels to provide lots of warm blood to the palate to increase its temperature. Unfortunately, the dilated blood vessels also stimulate pain receptors, which send a message to the brain through a nearby branch of the trigeminal nerve.

The trigeminal nerve has branches that travel to other parts of the face besides the mouth. It's thought that the brain mistakenly "believes" that the pain stimulus is coming from a branch serving the forehead and therefore creates the sensation of a headache in this area. The phenomenon in which pain created by a stimulus in one part of the body appears to come from another part of the body is known as referred pain.

Some other examples of referred pain in the body include pain in the left arm accompanying a heart attack and pain in the right shoulder accompanying a gall bladder attack.

A Brain Freeze Poll

Do you experience brain freezes when you eat or drink something cold?

See results without voting

Demonstration of a Knuckle Crack

Knuckle Cracking

Some people crack their knuckles to impress others, but for other people stretching the fingers to produce a popping sound can be a pleasurable or even a relaxing experience. Listeners may think that the popping sound is funny and even enviable, but some listeners wince as they hear the sound and think about what the person is doing to their joints.

Knuckle crackers have various techniques to make the cracking sound in their finger joints. Some pull the tip of each finger until they hear a pop. Others stretch all their fingers backwards at the same time.

Structure of a synovial joint; the bones are held together by fibrous ligaments outside the joint capsule
Structure of a synovial joint; the bones are held together by fibrous ligaments outside the joint capsule | Source

Cause of a Knuckle Crack or Pop

A joint is a region where the end of one bone lies close to the start of another one. The bones are held together by fibrous ligaments, which are omitted in the above diagram. In a synovial joint, such as the ones that occur in the knuckles, the space between the bones is filled with a liquid known as synovial fluid. This fluid acts as a lubricant during joint movement.

When a joint is stretched, the space between the bones increases and the pressure in the synovial fluid decreases. The reduced pressure causes tiny bubbles of gas to develop in the fluid. These bubbles fuse to form larger ones. As new fluid is released into the space from the joint lining, the bubbles burst, producing the popping sound.

There is a common belief that frequent knuckle cracking will cause arthritis, but researchers say that this isn't true. They say that the activity won't damage the inside of the joint and is mostly harmless. However, there is a slight chance that frequent knuckle cracking may damage the ligaments that hold the bones together or the tendons that attach muscles to the joint.

A Knuckle Cracking Poll

Do you crack your knuckles deliberately?

See results without voting

Demonstration of Ear Wiggling

Ear Wiggling in Humans

In other mammals, such as cats and dogs, ear wiggling is used to point the ears in the direction of a sound and enhance hearing. Each ear is capable of moving in a different direction from the other one.

Only about 10% to 20% of humans can wiggle their ears, and even then the movement isn't as impressive as that of other mammals. The fact that some of us can wiggle our ears and some of us can't is due to genetic differences.

Ear wiggling is said to be a vestigial feature—one that was beneficial for our ancestors but is no longer necessary for us. Vision is a more important sense than hearing for humans. Being able to wiggle the ears does have one advantage, however. It has great entertainment value.

A Young Kitten Wiggles Its Ears

The superior auricular muscle is coloured red in this diagram. The anterior auricular muscle is in front of the ear flap, or auricle, and the posterior auricular muscle is behind it.
The superior auricular muscle is coloured red in this diagram. The anterior auricular muscle is in front of the ear flap, or auricle, and the posterior auricular muscle is behind it. | Source

How Do Our Ears Move?

The ear is made of several sections and is mostly located inside a bone of the skull. The external ear flap that we can see is called the pinna or the auricle. The three auricular muscles around the pinna are responsible for ear wiggling. The functions of these muscles are as follows.

  • Anterior auricular muscle (in front of the pinna) - moves the pinna forward and upward
  • Superior auricular muscle (above the pinna) - moves the pinna upwards
  • Posterior auricular muscle (behind the pinna) - moves the pinna backwards

We all have these muscles in our body as well as nerves connected to the muscles. Only some of use can voluntarily make the muscles work, however.

An Ear Wiggling Poll

Can you wiggle your ears?

See results without voting

The Value of Understanding Weird Human Biology

Understanding how brain freezes occur may help us to understand migraines and other headache disorders better. Understanding how knuckles crack may improve our understanding of the activity inside joints. At the moment, understanding ear wiggling doesn't seem to have any practical importance. This may not always be the case, however. Maybe in the future someone studying the genetic differences between wigglers and non-wigglers will learn something new about the way in which genes or muscles operate. All knowledge about the human body is valuable.

© 2014 Linda Crampton

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Comments 66 comments

FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

I enjoyed this unusual hub. I am a knuckle cracking, ear wiggling, ice cream headache sufferer who solves the headache problem by pressing my thumb to the room of my mouth. Awesomely entertaining medical hub. Up and pinning, sharing.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you so much for the comment, the vote and the shares, Flourish! I appreciate your visit and support a great deal. I'm very impressed - I've never met anyone who experiences all three activities describe in this article before! Thanks for sharing your method for eliminating an ice cream headache.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 2 years ago from America

I hate brain freeze. I can't wiggle my ears and I don't crack my knuckles Interesting hub, enjoyed reading. Voted up and more.


CyberShelley profile image

CyberShelley 2 years ago

Great medical hub, found the ice cream headache part very interesting - as I get brain freeze. Didn't realise it went along with the migraine, which I also get. So I learnt something. Up, interesting and useful.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks for the visit, moonlake. I appreciate your comment and votes!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, CyberShelley. I experience both brain freezes and migraine, too. The potential connection is very interesting! Thank you very much for the votes.


billybuc profile image

billybuc 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

Really very interesting. I can't stand the sound of someone cracking their knuckles. It grosses me out for some reason. As for brain freezes, very cool information. :)


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Bill. Yes, I know people who can't stand the sound of knuckles cracking either! Thank you for the visit and the comment.


epbooks profile image

epbooks 2 years ago from Las Vegas, NV

Oh how I hate brain freeze! I crack my knuckles occasionally, but I do try not to as I've been brought up with that myth that it causes arthritis! I can't wiggle my ears, but...my mom can! Interesting hub. Very entertaining.


heidithorne profile image

heidithorne 2 years ago from Chicago Area

Interestingly, I crack my knuckles occasionally to help the arthritis. Loosens 'em up for me. Great info on something we don't usually think about. Voted up and interesting!


DDE profile image

DDE 2 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

You always come up with very interesting and informative hubs your ideas are so helpful and so much to think about from your hubs. Voted up, interesting and useful.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Liz. I don't like brain freeze, either. Luckily, although the headache is severe, it stops quickly for me. I try to prevent it whenever I can, though! It's interesting to hear that your mom can wiggle her ears but you can't! Thanks for the comment.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

That's a very interesting comment about knuckle cracking and your arthritis, Heidi! Thanks for the visit and the votes.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks, Devika. I always appreciate your visits and comments. Thank you for the votes as well.


WriterJanis profile image

WriterJanis 2 years ago from California

It was very interesting to read about the biology behind some of the common occurrences we observe. Now I know more about why I get brain freeze when I drink an Icy.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you for visiting and commenting, WriterJanis.


Maren Morgan M-T profile image

Maren Morgan M-T 2 years ago from Pennsylvania

I wish I could wiggle my ears...however, I am blessed with the gene for rolling my tongue into a trough. Great hub!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Rolling the tongue is an interesting ability, Maren Morgan! I wish I could do it. Thanks for the comment.


bdegiulio profile image

bdegiulio 2 years ago from Massachusetts

Hey Linda. How interesting. Three things that I have always wondered about but knew virtually nothing about. I do get brain freezes and it's usually a sign that I am eating or drinking something cold too quickly and need to slow done. I've always cracked my knuckles but always thought it was the ligaments popping. As for my ears they do very little wiggling but I've always wondered how other people do that. Great job.


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

Our bodies are truly amazing indeed! The brain freezes are so sharp and painful. Mine only last a few seconds, but those are painful seconds. I don't get migraines, thankfully. As far as knuckle cracking, I can't stand to watch someone cracking their knuckles as it just looks so painful. I wish I could wiggle my ears. My son can. LOL ...Interesting hub and I learned a lot. Up and more and away


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks, Bill. I don't crack my knuckles deliberately, but they do make a popping sound sometimes when I'm stretching my fingers. I enjoy watching videos of people cracking their knuckles on purpose, but the idea of doing that myself doesn't appeal to me!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Faith. Yes, our bodies are amazing! Your brain freezes sound like mine - stabbing and very painful but also very short lived. It's interesting to hear about another ear wiggler! Thanks for the votes.


Suzanne Day profile image

Suzanne Day 2 years ago from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

A cute hub! A person I know really likes to crack their knuckles and it's painful to listen to. Voted awesome and +'d.


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 2 years ago from England

Oh this is great alicia! lol! well who knew? I love the words 'sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia'!! and yes I did copy and paste it! I will keep to brain freeze, its so much easier to say! voted up all the way! nell


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 2 years ago from California

Loved, loved this hub!!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Nell. I'll stay with the term brain freeze, too. It sounds much more interesting! Thank you very much for the comment and the vote.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you so much, Audrey! I appreciate your visit.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you, Suzanne! I don't know anyone who likes to crack their knuckles regularly. I'm sure I would find the frequent popping sound very hard to take if I did!


Writer Fox profile image

Writer Fox 2 years ago from the wadi near the little river

I've never heard of a brain freeze, except what my computer does sometimes. And, I never knew that cold drinks might even be harmful for some people. You've put together some very interesting phenomena. Voted up!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks, Writer Fox! I appreciate your comment and vote.


bethperry profile image

bethperry 2 years ago from Tennesee

Your information is fascinating!

When I was young all the old folks would say cracking your knuckles would make them big. But then, when I was an adult, I heard a chiropractor once say that cracking the knuckles actually good for keeping the ligaments in the fingers flexible. I don't know which is true, but I occasionally crack mine to relieve arthritic pain twinges. And it does help.


ologsinquito profile image

ologsinquito 2 years ago from USA

Very in-depth article of brain freeze. I've always wondered what that was, and if everyone else gets it.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, bethperry. You're the second commenter to say that cracking your knuckles occasionally helps your arthritis! That's interesting information. Thank you for very much for the comment.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks for the comment, ologsinquito. I appreciate your visit!


truthfornow profile image

truthfornow 2 years ago from New Orleans, LA

I can't seem to crack my knuckles or wiggle my ears - boohoo. It was very interesting to read about the brain freeze as I just had no idea where that came from or what it was all about.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, truthfornow. Don't feel bad - I can't wiggle my ears and my knuckle cracks are audible but very quiet! Thank you for the comment.


CMHypno profile image

CMHypno 2 years ago from Other Side of the Sun

Thanks for the great explanations Alicia. Our human bodies are wonderful, complicated things, so the more we know about how it works the better.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much, Cynthia. I agree - it is important to understand how the body works!


Mel Carriere profile image

Mel Carriere 2 years ago from San Diego California

Brain freezes are sweet pain, so I don't mind them. I can't crack my knuckles or wriggle my ears, but as a preschooler I could actually flip open my eyelids without touching them. It was a very freakish skill, and the other kids used to gather around to watch me do it. Unfortunately I long ago lost this skill, and there goes the one edge I had on the rest of the human race. Great hub!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

I understand what you mean about brain freezes being sweet pain, Mel! That sounds like a fascinating skill that you had as a child. I've never heard of that ability before! Thank you very much for the comment.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia

Very interesting hub Alicia. I get brain freezes all the time, but fortunately it doesn't last long (I love cold foods and drinks...give me a thick shake any day). I only crack my knuckles occasionally, but my son does it all the time and his neck as well. Ear wiggling..impossible. Thank you for the information on how all these things work. Voted up.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks for the comment and the vote, Jodah. The thought of cracking my neck makes me shudder! I do crack my knuckles occasionally, but I do it accidentally, not deliberately. Ear wiggling is impossible for me, as it is for you!


Vellur profile image

Vellur 2 years ago from Dubai

Great hub informative and useful. I used to wonder how people make their ears wiggle and have tried it myself but I just cannot!! Now I know the science behind it. Thank you for sharing this educational hub, great write.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the kind comment, Vellur!


joedolphin88 profile image

joedolphin88 2 years ago from north miami FL

Really informative I always just assumed that stuff meant you were falling apart or hurting yourself one way or another


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, joedolphin88. No, as far as researchers know at the moment, there doesn't seem to be any damage caused by these behaviors, except for a low possibility of injury from frequent knuckle cracking. Thanks for the comment!


ignugent17 profile image

ignugent17 2 years ago

Very interesting information. It is always great to know new things everyday. I can't wiggle my ears and it sure fun to see somebody can do it. :-)


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, ignugent17. It is fun to watch people wiggle their ears, especially when we can't do it! Thanks for the comment.


aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 2 years ago from Stillwater, OK

This was very well done and sure answers a lot of questions for all of us. Good work!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you, Deb! I appreciate your comment.


Larry Rankin profile image

Larry Rankin 2 years ago from Oklahoma

I am fascinated with the diversity of human ability. Even our every day activities, like just digesting food, are amazing. This was a very fun read. Good job.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Larry. Yes, the abilities of the human body are fascinating! Thank you very much for the comment.


Torrs13 profile image

Torrs13 2 years ago from California

I typically get a brain freeze when I drink slushes. I don't get them much, if at all, when I eat ice cream or other cold treats, so it must be something with the ice that does it for me. I never realized how many theories there were as to what might cause one to occur! As for knuckle cracking, I avoid doing that. Honestly, I think it hurts! I do crack my neck though.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Torrs13. Thanks for sharing your experiences! The brain freeze is an interesting phenomenon. I hope researchers learn more about it.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

I have had brain freezes and now have some ideas of what to do when I get the next one thanks to reading this hub. The poor people who suffer with them for 5 minutes or longer! Mine are only temporary thank heavens! Up votes, pinning to my health board and sharing.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Peggy. I'm very glad that my brain freezes are temporary, too! Thank you very much for the comment, the votes, the pin and the share. I appreciate them all!


Rolly A Chabot profile image

Rolly A Chabot 2 years ago from Alberta Canada

Hi AliciaC... yet another of your professionally crafted hubs... you are amazing research writer and I always learn something from you.

It was comical and yet painful to watch two young boys at a Calgary Flames game having a slushy drinking competition on the Jumbo Screen... poor kids I felt sorry for them... Super Brain Freeze.

Hugs and Blessings


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Rolly! Thank you so much for the very kind comment. It's makes me shudder to think of the huge brain freeze that those boys may have experienced!


Kristen Howe profile image

Kristen Howe 19 months ago from Northeast Ohio

Alicia, this was real interesting to know about cracking knuckles and brain freeze and the such. What a fascinating read! Voted up!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 19 months ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much, Kristen! I appreciate your comment and the vote.


ALF 17 months ago

I find it odd, though - that when you play in the snow and your hands get freezing cold, they hurt from the cold, but is that also from nerves getting pressure from arteries dilating? I mean, heat and cold are part of the sensation we normally feel, and the variances would seem to have little to do with compensation for temperature change. Why can't brain freeze just becaused by the sensation of 'cold' but with a much lower pain threshold?


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 11 months ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

The biology of pain is a very interesting and not completely understood topic. When our skin gets cold, blood vessels in the surface of the skin constrict instead of expand, which prevents heat loss. Brain freezes seem to be a special case of pain.


ValKaras profile image

ValKaras 9 months ago from Canada

A very interesting hub, indeed. My own fascination is about what human mind can do, including in those areas of immunity to disease, healing, rejuvenation, and energy. According to Dr. Bruce Lipton, a cellular biologist, our attitudes and beliefs are playing an enormous part in our biology and physiology, oftentimes presenting the most important factor in our vitality.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 9 months ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, ValKaras. I've read about some of Bruce Lipton's ideas. They are certainly fascinating! I find his proposals very thought provoking. Thank you for the interesting comment.


DzyMsLizzy profile image

DzyMsLizzy 9 months ago from Oakley, CA

Hmmmm... very interesting, indeed!

I do suffer from brain freezes, but rarely from ice cream. It is usually caused by drinking semi-frozen 'slushy' drinks, which, on a hot day, tend to get slurped up a bit too quickly.

I have found that pressing the tongue against the roof of the mouth is a fairly quick cure. However, I don't get a real 'headache.' For me, it's more of a sinus area pain, at the bridge of my nose and radiating behind my eyes; very localized to the face, and very rarely up toward the top of my forehead.

Prevention involves holding the drink in the mouth a short time prior to swallowing, so it warms up just a tiny bit, but remains refreshingly cold.

Knuckle cracking, I'm unable to do. Ear wiggling? Well, I sort of can and sort of can't. Only in one direction; front to back, not up and down. And I really can't do it without involving facial muscles such as the jaw and/or eyebrows. LOL


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 9 months ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks for the comment and for sharing the interesting and useful information, DzyMsLizzy. Your experience with ear wiggling is especially interesting! I'll have to see if I can move my ears using your technique.

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