Brother against brother

Battle at stones river.
Battle at stones river.

Recently I have found that over twenty of my relatives were engaged in the Civil War. This is a history of their dealings in both Northern and Southern territories.

William Irwin Stewart Was born in Pennsylvania on the 9th of April 1827. He was a farmer and a coal miner and came to the decision to put his work aside for a short period to enter into the heated conflict. He mustered into Company C of the 79th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry on 15 October 1862 and mustered out 29 October 1862 at Nashville, TN on a medical discharge for wounds he received at Stones_Riverwhich was a decisive battle during the war and had the highest percentage of casualties on both sides. Upon his return from the war William found that all six of his children passed away. Despite this tragedy William and his wife Mary had six more children that lived.

The Armer brothers

On February 28th, 1862 Robert, Edward, and David Armour enlisted into Company I, of the Georgia 24th Infantry Regiment of the Confederacy. Two of the brothers, David and Edward, fought vigorously throughout the war. Unfortunately on the 6th of April 1865 Edward was apprehended at Farmville Virginia the day before a major battle broke out. http://www.mycivilwar.com/battles/650407a.htmEdward waited out the remainder of the war as a POW. He was shortly after released on the 22nd of June 1865 after taking the oath of allegiance to the United states. the oldest brother Robert went AWOL and never returned to service.

The Jones Brothers

Alfred D. Jones joined the Confederate side Regiment Name:1 (Fannin's) Georgia Reserves COMPANY B. Alfred enlisted along with his brother Wiley in the Confederate Army on April 27, 1864 in Company C, of The First (Fannie) Georgia Reserves State Guard, which later became The First Georgia Infantry State Guard. Alfred and his brother Wiley were both captured at The Battle of Utoy Creek http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Utoy_Creek in Atlanta, Georgia on August 7, 1864 and was taken as a POW and taken to Camp Chase http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_ChaseConfederate Prison in Columbus, Ohio. Alfred was at his brother's side when Wiley died on December 4, 1864 from a case of chronic diarrhea which is a common symptom of dehydration. Alfred remained at Camp Chase until the end of the war and was released on June 16, 1865.

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Worlys

Initially all of the Worley brothers Abraham, Henry, and John joined the rebelion in the 64th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry (Allen's) Company. All of them were in the same company, however Abraham was transfered several times and at some point was mortally wounded, although there is no documentation of this occurance. There has been a story handed down through the family that he was present at the battle of Chickamauga where it is believed that he died.

Corporal James Francis Boyd

James enlisted in the Confederacy on 14 may 1862 in Company A, 5th Batalion Cavalry Regiment North Carolina. On 3 Aug 1863 he Transferred into Company I, of the 6th Cavalry Regiment. On 22 June 1863 Corporal Boyd was captured at Wilson's Gap in the State of Virginia. the next day on the march in, he fled the scene and was counted as a deserter.

The Dockerey's at Cumberland gap

Elisha Dockery Enlisted 4 Jul 1861, 2nd regiment company H (Allan's Company) On 8 Feb 1862 he was taken prisoner by the forces of General A. E. Burnside on Roanoke Island and was released on parole at Elizabeth City on the 21st of February. Elisha Joined then the Calvary in Allen's Legion 64th regiment while on patrol where he met up with his brother Franklin. On the 7th of September 1863 the two Brothers found themselves engaged in a three day standoff at Cumberland Gap. Although many people on the confederate side escaped imprisonment, Franklin was among those who were apprehended. He was eventually released from camp Douglas in December after which he was enlisted into the Navy.

Jacob franklin

Jacob and his brother Benjamin were enlisted into the 39th North Carolina Infantry division http://hubpages.com/hub/Rebel-Soldieralthough both brothers decided to desert early on, Jacob quickly went from the ranks of deserter to patriot as he was apprehended and sent to the front lines at Chickamauga where he lost a leg from cannon fire. Benjamin ended up in the hospital but eventually recovered.

Stiles

William, charles and John Stiles all  enlisted in the 39th North Carolina Regiment company C. William's son Benjamin Joined the union.

"Benjamin was a union man and stayed in the army four years after the war. Benjamin's father, William L. "Bill" was a rebel. He kind of got forced into joining the Confederate Army. The union men captured him, and my grandfather, Benjamin was in the group that captured his own daddy. They took him to Knoxville to prison camp and there is where he died. My grandfather always said he worried about his father's soul and if he was ready to go when he died." -Mitchell Stiles, son of Benjamin.

Early on during the war John Stiles became deathly ill and was hospitalized. His Brother Chrales was given leave from his service to aid John at louden Hospital. John eventually recovered but was captured after being wounded at the battle of chickamauga on May 22nd 1863. He was later released after taking the oath of aliegance to the union.

In February of 1864 Charles was captured in Cherokee, North Carolina. After being sent to a detention camp at Ft. Deleware, Charles died from consumption while in captivity.

Union soldiers

George Henderson enlisted in the union army in the 3rd Regiment, Tennessee Mounted Infantry Company: E. and his brother James joined the 9th Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry Company: H Both were successful in their military service and quickly moved up in ranks. James was a Quarter master and a Seargent when he became ill and was hospitalized. He eventually recovered and was able to finish out his service. There is no record of any incidents which would indicate that they both kept their noses clean throughout the war.

Others

Newton C Faulkner Rank at enlistment: Private State Served: Georgia Service Record: Enlisted in Company H, Georgia 11th Cavalry Regiment Confederate

Robert M Faulkner Enlistment Date: 15 Jan 1862 Rank at enlistment: Private State Served: Georgia Service Record: Enlisted in Company I, Georgia 24th Infantry Regiment Confederate. On a hospital roll Robert was hospitalized for a severe case of rumatism.

Elisha Buis entered to the service in the 5th Calvary regiment company G of Missouri, and was discharged at Harrisonville on 23 February 1863. After a short while he became sick and was hospitalized at St. Joseph, he was then sent home and stayed there for several months before he recovered and was able to return to duty in April of 1862.

 

The Warners

Col. Andrew S Warner and his son Adelbert both enlisted in the Union out of New York. Andrew was a very prominent figure in the 139th Oswego regiment which he almost singlehandedly formed. As one of the fourty fighting brigades. Andrew was unable to finish out his service as he became violently ill.  http://hubpages.com/hub/family-history-part-3

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Comments 4 comments

kafsoa profile image

kafsoa 5 years ago

Good hub!


Onusonus profile image

Onusonus 5 years ago from washington Author

Thanks for reading!


ruffridyer 5 years ago from Dayton, ohio

I notice your family fought for both sides. Was there an epidemic that took william stewarts six children? I guess that was quite common back then. It must have been horrible to come home to such tragidy.

I wouldn't call Edward Armer capture before a major battle unfortunate. It might have spared his life.

Dying of diahria or other disease like Wily Jones did was the leading cause of death in the civil war.

I wonder if Benjamin Stiles felt remorse for his fathers death at a prison camp he helped send him to. Maybe it was his soul more than his dad william that he was really concerned about.

This is one of the better hub's I've run across, It is full of information yet is obviously quite heartfelt. A great hub.


Onusonus profile image

Onusonus 5 years ago from washington Author

Thank's again for reading, There is an old story about William Stewart and the deaths of his children that was passed down to our family, and I've found that others who are distantly realted to me know it as well. No one knows why they died though.

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