Butterflies - Species, Pictures & Information

Butterflies from around the world

Indian Leaf Butterfly: Kallima inachus
Indian Leaf Butterfly: Kallima inachus | Source
Isabella Butterfly:  Euides isabella, from Mexico through Brazil
Isabella Butterfly: Euides isabella, from Mexico through Brazil | Source
The Paper Kite Butterfly: Idea lueconoe, from Malaysia, & Philippines
The Paper Kite Butterfly: Idea lueconoe, from Malaysia, & Philippines | Source
Emerald Swallowtail or Banded Peacock
Emerald Swallowtail or Banded Peacock | Source
Common Blue Morpho, or Blue Morpho : Morpho menelaus, from Costa Rica
Common Blue Morpho, or Blue Morpho : Morpho menelaus, from Costa Rica | Source
Clipper Butterfly:  Parthenos sylvia, from Southeast Asia
Clipper Butterfly: Parthenos sylvia, from Southeast Asia | Source
Source
The Malachite:  Siproeta stelenes, found in Costa Rica
The Malachite: Siproeta stelenes, found in Costa Rica | Source
Clipper Butterfly: Parthenos sylvia.  This is the more tiger colored variety of Clipper.
Clipper Butterfly: Parthenos sylvia. This is the more tiger colored variety of Clipper. | Source
Owl Butterfly:  Cailigo memnon, from Central and South America
Owl Butterfly: Cailigo memnon, from Central and South America | Source
Source
Source
Green Jay:  Graphium agamemnon, from the Philippines
Green Jay: Graphium agamemnon, from the Philippines | Source
Orange Shoemaker:  Catonephele orites, from Surinam
Orange Shoemaker: Catonephele orites, from Surinam | Source
I believe this is an Orange Tiger Butterfly:  Dryadula phaetusa, from El Salvador.  If not it may be an Orange Julia:  Dryas Julia, from Costa Rica.
I believe this is an Orange Tiger Butterfly: Dryadula phaetusa, from El Salvador. If not it may be an Orange Julia: Dryas Julia, from Costa Rica. | Source
Common Mormon Butterfly:  Papilio polytes, from Southeast Asia
Common Mormon Butterfly: Papilio polytes, from Southeast Asia | Source
Atlas Moth:  Attacus atlas, from Malaysia
Atlas Moth: Attacus atlas, from Malaysia | Source
Thoas Swallowtail:  Papilio thoas, from Central and South America
Thoas Swallowtail: Papilio thoas, from Central and South America | Source
The Great Mormon Butterfly:  Papillo memnon, from Southeast Asia (Need to double check this, and verify for sure.)
The Great Mormon Butterfly: Papillo memnon, from Southeast Asia (Need to double check this, and verify for sure.) | Source
The Great Egg Fly Butterfly:  Hypolimnas bolina, from Malaysia
The Great Egg Fly Butterfly: Hypolimnas bolina, from Malaysia | Source
Common Crow Butterfly:  Euploea modesta, from Asia
Common Crow Butterfly: Euploea modesta, from Asia | Source

Butterflies from around the world

Over the last few years, I have really enjoyed learning more about butterflies from around the world. One of the greatest ways to do this is to read of course, but if you don't have the opportunity to travel to different countries, you can visit a butterfly house. When I travel around, I keep an eye out if there is a local butterfly exhibit, or butterfly conservatory, garden, etc. I am sharing some of the pictures I have captured at these times. I hope you can get a glimpse of what I have seen and learned.

First picture is of an Indian Leaf Butterfly, and it is called that in part because when the butterfly is closed, you see what looks like a dead leaf. It's a great camouflage for such a brightly colored butterfly. A master of disguise, I wish I had the other side of the butterfly to show you. but it literally looks like a dead leaf. Down to the leaf like veins and smudges, its an incredible creation. Indian leaf butterflies live in a hostile environment. They can escape detection by disappearing into the scenery. They like tropical forests, in Pakistan, India, and are also found in southern China and Taiwan.

Isabella, is the name of the second butterfly you see there. It also goes by Euiedes isabella. It has long and fairly narrow wings, with black, orange, yellow and sometimes a white coloring. The Isabella loves passionflowers. After the can shaped eggs change colors from cream to black and hatch, the caterpillar also goes through some color changes. It begins with a spiny, black and white head, and some orange. From there it changes a couple more times, and does something very interesting when it goes to the chrysalis stage. It seems to have tentacles that are ivory colored, that happen to look just like the passion flower tendrils, the favorite host plant. I saw a picture of that, and it is just incredible to me. If I can find one to share here, I will. It looks like something from out of this world. Once the butterfly emerges from the chrysalis, its easy to tell if its a male or a female. If the antennae are yellow, its a female. If they are black, its a male. Something that is neat to know when you are observing them. They are active in the daylight hours and love tropical forests from Mexico through Brazil. The wingspan is anywhere from 2 1/4 inches to 3 inches.

The butterfly with the bright blue colors in it, is the Blue Morpho butterfly. They are truly spectacular in their coloring. Its a metallic blue that seems to sparkle and glisten in the sunlight. There have been some amazon tribe that thought that they were a part of the sky, that had fallen to earth. For this particular butterfly, the colors are not from the scales on their wings, as much as from reflected light. The scales on blue morphos are covered with tiny bumps and crevices that then act as prisms, which refracts the sunlight and gives off an electric blue sheen. How beautiful! When a bird or predator comes close, blue morphos can flash their wings and startle the bird long enough to get away usually. The sudden flash of color seems to startle the predator. Naturalists have found that if they go to a jungle clearing and wave around a blue piece of cloth, that soon after male blue morphos will come around to investigate. Females of this species sometimes have more colors, including shades of yellow, orange and brown. They can be found in tropical forests in Central and South America. Their wing span is fairly large, 5-6 inches across. These are an incredible butterfly to watch, and are among my favorite.

The black and white butterfly, is called The Paper Kite, or Large Tree Nymph. The other name for it is Idea leuconoe. This butterfly likes the seashore and mangrove swamps. It likes to fly during the day in tropical forests . Locations you can find this butterfly are Thailand to Malaysia, Philippines and Taiwan. There are about 22 recorded subspecies of this butterfly, but all look pretty similar. As they age, their white color yellows a bit, and their black markings fade to gray. Wingspan is about 3 3/4 - 4 1/2 inches long.

The Clipper butterfly, also known as Parthenos sylvia, appears to have 4 legs instead of the typical six, for a butterfly. The legs are just very tiny, but are there. Clippers have tiger like markings, but there is a variety that have a very beautiful variety with metallic blue wings. Its favorite plant is lantana. These butterflies were discovered in the Solomon Islands of the South Pacific. Being a very strong flier, Clippers have a wider range that extends from India to Sri Lanka, to Malaysia, and from Papau New Guinea to Australia. They love tropical forests, and their wings span 4 to 4 1/2 inches across.

The Tailed Jay, also known as the Green Jay has very beautiful colored bright green spots. It also goes by Graphium agamemnon, and is found in the Philippines. This butterfly is a fast flying one and is a favorite among butterfly lovers. The wings are solid black, with an interesting pattern of green spots. Its a more dramatic form of camouflage. In the jungle, predators can mistake the spots for sunlight shining through leaves. The spots fade to yellow after the butterfly dies. The eggs are laid by females, one at a time on custard apple family of plants, Annonaceae. Since the time between hatching and chrysalis is longer, there is a built in defense mechanism so that the Green Jay doesn't get eaten while in caterpillar stage. It has a built in organ behind its head that can produce an odor that is very unpleasant to would be predators. It is called an osmeterium, and looks similar to the tongue of a snake. If in danger, the caterpillar extends organ, and it drives off the predator. They love custard apple, which grows well in the tropics. They love tropical forests and lowlands. You can find them in Malaysia and Southeast Asia. Their wing span is about 4 inches across.

The Emerald Swallowtail or Papilio palinurus, can often go by a few other names as well. It might be called the Banded Peacock, Burmese Banded Peacock, moss peacock, green moss peacock or Princeps palinurus. They are from southeast Asia area. I think the green colors that seem to have an inner light and glitter effect are so beautiful.

The Malachite Butterfly, or Siproeta Stelenes can also go by the name Pearly Malachite. It can be found in Costa Rica, Brazil, and some southern parts of Florida and Texas in the United States. This green is equally beautiful in color, just different and more matte colored than the Emerald Swallowtail.

The Owl, or Banded Owl Butterfly are so amazing in that they have that built in defense mechanism of the appearance of a large eyeball on its wings. This is extremely startling to predators that think the owner of such an eye must be a much larger creature than just a fragile butterfly! These beauties are from Central and South America, and are officially called Caligo Eurilochus.

Many of these butterflies are attracted to the nectar of many exotic flowers. Some of them, like to land on little plates of fruit that have been set out. The fruits are out in the open, warm moist air, and you can imagine they begin to get even more of a smell about them, which is very appealing to these butterflies. It like trying to recreate the scenario that would be found in a rain forest, where fruits ripen on their trees or bushes, and eventually fall off, and break open. What the butterfly then finds is a very syrupy sweet treat! They also may like sugar water, and need lots of moisture. I often see grapes put out, cut in half and just laid open there, next to the plaintains, or bananas and other fruits.

If you ever do your own butterfly garden, it has been suggested that you can do this on your own to attract butterflies to your area. If you have a way to do that doesn't attract lots of other ants and what not, why not try it?

Thank you for stopping by, and I hope you learned something new that you didn't know before. Please check back, as I hope to add more butterflies in the future. I will add to this hub, and any new information I find. If you ever get the chance to see these beautiful creatures, please do, and enjoy the wonderful beauty they bring to our world.

Comments 42 comments

nifty@50 profile image

nifty@50 6 years ago

Very nice pictures, they have a Butterfly house at Callaway Gardens where you can see many species of Butterflies outside you may be able to take pictures of some of the Humming birds! Thanks for sharing


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 6 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Nifty, that sounds just lovely. I love to go to places like that, and never ever bore of them. As for hummingbirds, I would love to get pictures of those amazing little creatures. Thank you for stopping by.


Pamela Kinnaird W profile image

Pamela Kinnaird W 6 years ago from Maui and Arizona

It's really commendable -- how much you have learned about butterflies. I love butterflies. Thanks for sharing this knowledge in one nice hub as you've done. The photographs are wonderful.

I have a book of field photos of butterflies and so I'd seen most of these before but only laid out flat -- not like this on foliage. Two of the butterflies you've shared are so exquisite and yet don't look real. The paper kite (green) and the Common Mormon with the pink on it are the ones I'm referring to. I know they are real because these are photos. It's like some sunsets. They are so beautiful, but look so artistically planned that if you were to paint them EXACTLY as they look, the painting would look unrealistic. Amazing.


awcase profile image

awcase 6 years ago

OMG I Love this. there are so many butterflies in the world and I do have to tell you they are all beautiful. I saw this hub and after reading it I am going to share it with others. Thank you so much for sharing this Ocean. =)


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 6 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Pamela, thank you very much for coming by and your comment! Yes I totally agree, its amazing that they are real, yet look too intricate to paint almost. They are like sunsets, like you said, and its like the prettiest art of all.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 6 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Awcase, thank you so much! I really appreciate it, and am always so happy to see you. There are so many more butterflies too, its like an amazing art show, with the prettiest art.


Varenya profile image

Varenya 6 years ago

Very lovable hub, I really enjoyed the reading and the amazing pictures. I definitely love all the butterfly species; once I saw a caterpillar transforming into a butterfly of many colours: really, an amazing scene!


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 5 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Varenya, thank you! I love the colors and amazing designs and colors too.


PhoenixV profile image

PhoenixV 5 years ago from USA

great hub


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 5 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Thank you Phoenix.


brightforyou profile image

brightforyou 5 years ago from Florida

What a truly beautiful hub. Thank you for all the hard work, research, fabulous photos and commitment to excellence - Wonderful!


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 5 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Brightforyou, you just made my day, thank you very much for your kind words. This is truly a joy of mine to study butterflies and moths.


timonweller profile image

timonweller 5 years ago

Congrats on the awesome hub, butterflies are definitely one of the most amazing creatures on the planet. Nice pics as well.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 5 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Timonweller, thank you very much! I totally agree with what you said about butterflies. Thanks for the comment.


merilyn 5 years ago

Great pictures! What beautiful butterflies! If you can come to Cebu City, Philippines, you can visit the Jumalon museum where Professor Julian Jumalon's children have set up a butterfly sanctuary and artworks (like pictures of distinguished persons) made with a mosaic of butterfly wings. With your talent


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 5 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Merilyn, Thank you! I would love to go to Cebu City Philippines one day to see the that butterfly sanctuary, it sounds wonderful. Thanks for your comment.


MellowDayLondon profile image

MellowDayLondon 5 years ago from South Africa

I really enjoy reading your Hubs. Well written and informative.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 5 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Thank you very much MellowDayLondon, you just made my day. :)


KLeichester 5 years ago

That's a nice hub. Thanks for sharing!


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 5 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Thank you, KLeichester!


suzetteboston profile image

suzetteboston 5 years ago

Wonderful article and outstanding pictures.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 5 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hello Suzetteboston, thank you so much for your kind words! I am happy you stopped by my butterfly hub! :)


Docmo profile image

Docmo 5 years ago from UK

This is a brilliant hub - learnt so much about these beauties. The pictures complemented the words nicely. Well researched and written. voted up & awesome!


NP.QUEEN profile image

NP.QUEEN 5 years ago from Dubai

Hi oceansnsunsets,

Beautiful butterflies......Thank you for sharing this hub.You are always welcome to go through my hubs also.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 5 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hello Docmo, thank you very much for your kind words! So glad you learned more about these butterflies and thank you for the visit as well.


andrebreynolds profile image

andrebreynolds 5 years ago

Very fun and interesting hub on butterflies. The photos are very clear.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas

Such lovely creatures! I have one that comes back year after year and hovers back and forth around the same area of the yard each time.


PhoenixV profile image

PhoenixV 5 years ago from USA

I was looking at this again and its just a super hub really, excellent job!


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

NP Queen, thank you for the visit and your comment. :)

Andrebreynolds, thank you very much! I appreciate that!

PegCole17, thank you for your comment. I enjoy it when they come back like that, I think its awesome. They must love your garden!

Phoenix, thank you!


Michael 4 years ago

It is the beauty of the earth-creatures with life fly around cheering people on earth. There is no robot or man made machine that cheer people and bring people to calm and satisfy comfort.Let them free as we people are also free: Amen


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 4 years ago from Houston, Texas

I wrote a hub on the Cockrell Butterfly Center in Houston which shows butterflies flying freely and also hatching...but did not identify the different types as you did in this wonderful hub. What would you think of linking our hubs together? As you say, butterfly centers introduce people to seeing many more than they would ordinarily see in their home gardens and environments. Up, useful and beautiful votes.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Michael, I totally hear you there. Nothing that has been made by humans has ever come so close to bringing such cheer and joy and beauty as nature has been able to. There is just a whole other level that man cannot begin to touch, and yet mankind can appreciate and enjoy it all. How wonderful a gift of life to us all. Thank you so much for your comment and visit here. :)

Peggy, Thanks so much for your visit, and your hub sounds great. I am not familiar (if you can believe it) with how to link link hubs together like you mentioned. Butterflies are a true passion of mine, and I am so glad you found one of my butterfly hubs. This is my biggest one I think, it has the most photos, information etc. I am so glad you liked it. I can share a link, if that is what you mean? Have a great day! :) Paula


imran 4 years ago

ofcourse there reamaining some incredible beauty into the creation of the creator


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hello Imran, There is incredible beauty in the creation, and I am so thankful to the Creator who made it all. So glad you stopped by and left a comment. I am happy there are other butterfly lovers out there. :)


scorpgirl 4 years ago

such amazing pictures. Love them flying butterflies. Bring such beauty to this world. We have Marnarchs and yellow ones here and today i seen a black and orange one. Wish i knew the name of them. Thank you for sharing. :)


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hello Scorpgirl, thank you so much. I also love flying butterflies and think they do bring such beauty to our world. I wonder where you live that you have such a display of different colors of butterflies right now to enjoy! Our season isn't to that point yet, but will be in the next several weeks and especially later on in summer time.

I hope you continue to enjoy your different butterflies that you have there. The black and orange one sounds like a type of swallowtail perhaps, and the yellow one sounds like a sulphur type of butterflies. The monarchs are always a joy to behold! I wish you the best.


Mistery 4 years ago

Hi i love the picture but on this website dont you think its a good idea to put more butterflies on it


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Thank you for your comment, and I am glad you love the pictures!


m51young 3 years ago

I have seen a pic of a black and pink butterfly on a facebook page and loved it. I don't know if it is photoshopped on the color but maybe you can identify it and clear it up for me. I have the pic in my computer file.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 3 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

To the question about the black and pink butterfly, I wonder if it is a variation on the Scarlet Mormon butterfly? If you look up images, and compare the patterns of the markings that may help as well. They have distinct patterns. I have seen the Scarlet Mormon's red markings look very pink in some photos, and even in person at times in a conservatory. Simply beautiful!


kgvyshnavi@gmail.com 2 years ago

wonderful.i love butterflies and i also love to learn more about them


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 2 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Thank you for your comment. It is always nice to hear from a fellow butterfly lover that enjoys learning more about them.

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