By The Law: The Path Of The Lawyer

Although never having gone to law school myself (a difficult task in my case as I am still a year shy of 20), I have a fair understanding of the trials of law school and being a lawyer. As the son of an attorney/part time judge, I have sat in on many hearings, presentations, and discussions associated with this topic. Law school generally takes three years to complete after undergraduate school. Once this is completed, you need to pass the bar exam for the state you wish to practice law in. Then, you must associate yourself with a firm, or work independently. This is a very long and strenuous process, one that can only be endured by those determined to be lawyers. However, once you become a licensed attorney, the real work begins. Lawyers often have massive case loads, and spend many hours studying past cases and forming arguments for their clients' cases. Then comes the grand performance in the courtroom: defending the case. Although many are often dismissed or settled early, some cases will inevitably go to trial. As sensational as television and movies make courtroom trials seem, they are in actuality often quite technical and meticulous. That is not to say that going to trial cannot be thrilling. For some, the act of engaging in debate and strategically countering arguments can be quite fulfilling, and is one of the many reasons why one may choose to become an attorney. If long hours, large workloads, and defending the liberties of civilians in the courtroom sounds like fun, then the attorney's profession is for you.

1 comment

tanvir munim profile image

tanvir munim 8 years ago from Dhaka, Bangladesh

Short but good hub!

but dont you think that only to get admitted in the law shcools is not the great job done by a student since the law schools have nothing to offer to make a student a versatile personality like some legal professionals. The world was ruled by legal personalities and still ruling by them in many aspects. But all that were their credits. Law is a great subject by itself not that the law schools are making the law subject to its great extent.

Take Care

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