Civil War Odyssey Leads Visitors to Shiloh, Tennessee

Engraved on the Tennessee Memorial is a statement by Confederate Brigadier General Patrick R. Cleburne, and recounted by a soldier in the 23rd Tennessee Infantry. "The Tennesseans had more to fight for. The fight was for their homes and firesides."
Engraved on the Tennessee Memorial is a statement by Confederate Brigadier General Patrick R. Cleburne, and recounted by a soldier in the 23rd Tennessee Infantry. "The Tennesseans had more to fight for. The fight was for their homes and firesides." | Source
Shiloh Battlefield was named after this peaceful, small log Methodist church, known as the Shiloh Meeting House.
Shiloh Battlefield was named after this peaceful, small log Methodist church, known as the Shiloh Meeting House. | Source
Pittsburg Landing on the Tennessee River enabled the Union to reinforce its Army for the second day of battle.
Pittsburg Landing on the Tennessee River enabled the Union to reinforce its Army for the second day of battle. | Source
U.S. Gunboats Tyler and Lexington took positions on the East side of the Tennessee River, and went into action about 5 p.m., repelling the last Confederate attack Sunday evening, and continued shelling into the enemy camps every half-hour all night.
U.S. Gunboats Tyler and Lexington took positions on the East side of the Tennessee River, and went into action about 5 p.m., repelling the last Confederate attack Sunday evening, and continued shelling into the enemy camps every half-hour all night. | Source
Over 23,746 soldiers were killed, wounded or missing at Shiloh.
Over 23,746 soldiers were killed, wounded or missing at Shiloh. | Source
Now dry, Bloody Pond was used by soldiers of the North and South alike to drink, and wash away their blood and sweat. Men and horses died here, staining the water bloody red.
Now dry, Bloody Pond was used by soldiers of the North and South alike to drink, and wash away their blood and sweat. Men and horses died here, staining the water bloody red. | Source
The Confederate Monument commemorates where Confederate troops encircled and captured about 2,100 Union defenders at the Hornets' Nest.
The Confederate Monument commemorates where Confederate troops encircled and captured about 2,100 Union defenders at the Hornets' Nest. | Source
A portrait in the Shiloh Museum displays John Clem, a 10-year-old Union drummer boy, who was reportedly one of the youngest participants in the Battle at Shiloh He later retired as an Army Major General.
A portrait in the Shiloh Museum displays John Clem, a 10-year-old Union drummer boy, who was reportedly one of the youngest participants in the Battle at Shiloh He later retired as an Army Major General. | Source
Ohio 5th Cavalry monument.
Ohio 5th Cavalry monument. | Source
The Iowa Memorial.
The Iowa Memorial. | Source
An Indiana infantry memorial.
An Indiana infantry memorial. | Source
A Michigan memorial.
A Michigan memorial. | Source
The Shiloh National Military Park is a pristine example of cherished Civil War history. The exhibits, displays, buildings, grounds, and auto tour maps are excellent.
The Shiloh National Military Park is a pristine example of cherished Civil War history. The exhibits, displays, buildings, grounds, and auto tour maps are excellent. | Source
Source
Union  and Confederate uniforms on display.
Union and Confederate uniforms on display. | Source
Pittsburg Landing Book Store
Pittsburg Landing Book Store | Source

The Battle at Pittsburg Landing

Union General Ulysses S. Grant concluded after the Battle at Shiloh on April 6 and 7, 1862, that the Union was in for a long and arduous Civil War. Likewise, Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard wired to his superiors in Richmond, "If defeated here we lose the Mississippi Valley, and probably our cause."

Since two important Southern railroads crossing through Corinth, Mississippi were at stake during the Civil War (the Memphis & Charleston, and the Mobile & Ohio), the railroad intersection made Corinth the most strategic transportation hub for the Western Confederacy.

Leaders of the Confederacy at Shiloh were Albert Sidney Johnston, P.G.T. Beauregard, Sterling Price, and Earl Van Dorn. Union leaders were Ulysses S. Grant, Henry W. Halleck, Don Carlos Buell, and William Rosecrans.

In February 1862, Union General U.S.Grant captured Forts Henry and Donelson, forcing Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston to abandon Kentucky and Middle Tennessee. In order to halt a Union advance into the Mississippi Valley, Johnston assembled his forces at the Corinth railroad hub

In mid-March 1862, Grant steamed up the Tennessee River, disembarking at Pittsburg Landing, about 22 miles northeast of Corinth. Grant awaited Don Carlos Buell's Army of the Ohio marching from Nashville, and prepared for an advance on Corinth.

Day One, Sunday, April 6, 1862

Taking the initiative, Johnston led 44,000 men against Grant at dawn on April 6, 1862. When a federal patrol spotted the confederates, fierce fighting began in the field and forest encampments of Grant's 40,000 men around the small Shiloh Meeting House. In the afternoon, General Johnston, while still mounted on his horse, was struck below the right knee by a stray minie ball, tearing open an artery, and he bled to death a few minutes later. General Beauregard then assumed the Confederate command.

At the end of the first bloody day of battle, the Confederate Army had pushed Grant's forces into retreat, and taken hundreds of Union troops captive. Grant's Army was pushed back to Pittsburg Landing. However, by sundown that first day, Union forces were reinforced by General Buell's Army of the Ohio crossing the Tennessee at Pittsburg Landing, and protecting Grant's line with gunboats and artillery. With thousands of fresh troops, Grant prepared for a Union counter-attack the following morning.

Day Two, Monday, April 7, 1862

Outnumbered Confederates resisted the Union counter-attack for six long hours on April 7, 1862 until they could no longer hold their lines. Beauregard ordered a retreat to Corinth in order to save his Army. Battered Union troops did not pursue.

Shiloh's 23,746 casualties at Shiloh foretold the Civil War would become an extremely bloody and lengthy conflict for both sides.

A marker1055 Pittsburg Landing Road, Shiloh, TN 38376 -
Pittsburg Landing Rd, Shiloh, TN 38376, USA
[get directions]

Shiloh is in Hardin County, Tennessee, 10 miles SW of Savannah on Highway 22. Entrance fees are colleted at the Visitor Center. Open 8-5 p.m. daily.

Comments 3 comments

daryl2007 profile image

daryl2007 5 years ago

this is amazing!! great story about Civil war!!! Keep writing and keep inspiring people to appreciate war stories.!!!

http://worldwar42.blogspot.com


JLPeterson profile image

JLPeterson 5 years ago from Phoenix, AZ

Great hub....I can tell you love history! Voted up and awesome


WesternHistory profile image

WesternHistory 5 years ago from California

Very good hub. There are many interesting Civil War stories and this is certainly one of them.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working