Life in the Sixties - Simpler Times

The Family Car

The Family Car was a 1964 Chevy Bel Air station wagon.
The Family Car was a 1964 Chevy Bel Air station wagon.

Key West, where our childhood family grew up, was a small community where we could ride our bikes to the beach, the canal or the salt flats nearly every day of the year. The Atlantic Ocean was just a few minutes away. Weekends, we looked forward to an outing on the family's fiberglass boat where we'd head out before dawn and launch the boat at Islamorada spending the day on the water with the wind and sun on our faces.

After a storm, we would hunt for conch shells washed to shore by the turbulence of the water that washed footprints and sand castles out to sea. Having a sunburn on Monday spoke volumes about the great weekend you had. There were few worries about SPF and skin damage from the sun with TV commercials convincing us that Solarcaine stops sunburn pain. The aroma of Coppertone always brings back those memories of the tropics for me.

The Florida Keys

A markerIslamorada FL -
Islamorada, FL, USA
[get directions]

Source

The Florida Keys in the sixties was a great place to grow up. We walked to school or rode our bikes down the quiet, tree-lined streets of the small island of Key West. Most of our afternoons were spent scouting the neighborhood for discarded soda bottles tossed out from passing cars. Unlike the aluminum cans of the present, after a good scrubbing with a bottle brush and the garden hose, we'd pedal the short distance to the general store and turn in the bottles for a refund of two cents each.

Coke in a Real Glass

A ten-cent sized serving of Coke from the fountain
A ten-cent sized serving of Coke from the fountain

With the proceeds from a good day of sleuthing, we could buy one of our favorite comic books, Donald Duck, Bugs Bunny or Superman for just ten cents. If our bounty was large, we might splurge a nickel on a soda at the fountain.

If we wanted to take it along, we used the ten cent vending machine inside the store that held bottled drinks. There was nothing finer than an ice cold grape soda sliding out of the chute on a hot summer's day. A quick tip of the cap into the bottle opener and psfshew, it was ready to drink.

Little did we know that the future of glass bottles was about to change dramatically.

Transistor radios were the tech toy of the day. Mine had a black leather cover and a loose connection on the battery wire, making reception a little sketchy at times. When it did play, it had a clear and crisp sound that was even cooler when you held the little box right next to your ear. Much like the early cell phones, transistor radios put off heat that made your ear turn red, but it was cool to own one.

Afternoon hours were spent outside, playing to the crisp beat of a bouncing ball. We played box ball or four square on the street next to our house. The square was drawn in chalk on the pavement and divided into four equal sections large enough to house one player. Any kind of bouncing ball could used to play the game. Of course, we moved aside for any traffic that passed through.

Transistor Radio, the iPod of the past
Transistor Radio, the iPod of the past

The Sixties Music

Those times were filled with good food from A & W Root Beer with car hops who wore roller skates to deliver meals to their drive-in customers. Burger King was still the Home of the Whopper, Dairy Queen, the best place for a vanilla cone and Royal Castle for a Birch Beer in a frosted mug.

Dollar night at the drive-in movies featured movies with Abbott and Costello, Laurel and Hardy and The Three Stooges. The Key West Conch Train, filled with tourists, made its way around the city then returned to its station next to the church we attended on Sundays.

On rare occasions when relatives came into town, and our family went out for dinner at the A & B Lobster House next to the fishing docks. Fresh lobster salad cost less than four dollars and the Key Lime pie was the highlight of the meal.

Frosty mug of root beer
Frosty mug of root beer

The Day JFK Was Shot

Our daily ritual included reciting the Pledge of Allegiance everyday while facing the flag with our hand over our heart. We sang, "My Country 'Tis of Thee, Sweet Land of Liberty, of Thee I sing". Then my sixth grade teacher would pick someone to read a short passage from the Bible to start the day. Yes, it was a public school and no one complained a bit about this little exercise of freedom.

When rockets were scheduled to launch from Cape Canaveral, our elementary school Principal, Mr. Carey, would roll an Audio Visual cart into the cafeteria so we could watch the launch in real time. Was that just a Florida thing? Sometimes we could see the arc of the rocket in the sky as it rose across the state.

In one of his last appearances in the Florida Keys, President Kennedy, traveling down A1A in his white Lincoln Continental convertible, turned to wave to our little group standing by the roadway. Not long after that, I was sitting by the window in science class when the announcement came over the PA that JFK had been shot. I could hear a few of my classmates crying and an immediate tone of sadness prevailed, before we were dismissed from school early.

My Dad came straight from the Key West Navy Base in his khaki uniform to pick me up from school. Our family spent the evening in a state of shock glued to the news brought to us by Chet Huntley and David Brinkley reporting.

The Race for Space

Apollo Rocket Launch from Cape Canaveral
Apollo Rocket Launch from Cape Canaveral

Cosmetics and Products

Hair products were different, too. There was Prell shampoo, a green product that sometimes turned blond hair an odd color. Girls used Dippity Doo styling gel to set their hair on spongy pink rollers. Their slogan on the TV commercials sang about once-a-week hair styling.

Some who had long hair used empty orange juice containers for a smooth look, sleeping while wearing those cans on our head. Get Straight was a hair straightening product intended to remove curls and waves. Curl Free was a chemical process to straighten hair at home. In between using straighteners, girls ironed their hair on an ironing board.

Yardley Good Morning Slicker lipstick, a nearly white shade of pink, was fashionable to wear along with exaggerated eyeliner drawn with a black kohl pencil. For special effects, we painted white eyeliner around the black and some painted pretend eyelashes on the lower lid, like Twiggy, a famous model of the era.

Chevy Impala

This convertible that came with a 283, bald tires and a huge gas tank.
This convertible that came with a 283, bald tires and a huge gas tank.

My first car was a used 1959 Chevrolet Impala convertible that was a joint purchase with my older brother. Being a senior, he got more street time, than I did as a lowly sophomore. That was until he left for college then it was mine alone. At lunch time in high school, we'd pile as many of us as would fit into the car; and with the convertible top down and the radio blaring we'd cruise over to 7 Eleven where we would get freshly made French fries for a quarter. Or we might stop at Royal Castle for a hamburger and a Birch beer.

At Arby's, they hand-carved sandwich slices from a real roast beef on their slicing machine right before your eyes at the counter. They also made the best Jamocha milkshakes, a combination of chocolate ice cream, milk and a dash of coffee. Other times it would be off to Burger King where we'd order a whopper cut in half with no onions, just in case of a close encounter.

There was no super sizing back then.

Train Trip to Washington DC

HS Concert Chorus in Washington, D.C.. That's me, front row 4th from the left.
HS Concert Chorus in Washington, D.C.. That's me, front row 4th from the left. | Source
The Rotunda US Capitol Building
The Rotunda US Capitol Building

Senior Year

My senior year, our ninety-voice Concert Choir rode the train from Miami, Florida to Washington, D.C. accompanied by the high school performing band and a few parents who served as chaperones. It was a twenty-five hour ride jostling along in standard cars with no sleeping quarters, not that we did much sleeping.

Soon after arrival in the nation's capital, we performed the Battle Hymn of the Republic in the Rotunda building with those incredible acoustics, our A Capella voices ringing out young and true. Later, we headed out by tour bus to visit the National Archives and view the original documents that forged the basis of our freedom. In Arlington, Virginia we competed in the Cherry Blossom Festival of Performing Concert Choirs. Afterward, we took the much quieter train ride back home.

For our final performance of the year, the Mixed Concert Chorus performed Lerner and Lowe's 1954 musical "Brigadoon" for which we rehearsed endlessly. Naturally, we sold tickets trying to raise money for a recording system needed in our music room.

That last year of the nineteen sixties, graduation day sneaked up far too soon, setting off major changes in our lives and the way things had always been. It was the end of an era and a commencement of a new world in the seventies.

Adam Lambert, sings "Come to Me" from Brigadoon

Into the Sunset

Florida Gulf Coast
Florida Gulf Coast | Source

© 2011 Peg Cole

More by this Author


Comments 96 comments

mckbirdbks profile image

mckbirdbks 5 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

Good morning Peg. Reading your Hub this morning was like a mini vacation. Soda fountains, transistor radios just great. I remember the freedom to ride my bike many miles from home and as long as I was home by dark, no one had any concern. I remember 3 cent pop bottles, must be a regional thing. Street baseball and street football were popular. Have a relaxing Sunday.


SubRon7 profile image

SubRon7 5 years ago from eastern North Dakota

After the 10th grade I quit school (spring 60) From then until spring 62 I was so happy finally being free on the farm. June 1, 1962, I joined the navy....

Good hub, Peg, truly a trip down memory lane.


Sunnie Day 5 years ago

Hi Peg,

What a great hub..I remember dippity do..lol and riding my bike for hours..no worries of strangers..I as born in 60...Remember the day dad left for Vietnam..the box ball game later became four square I think..I loved it..

Wonderful hub,

Sunnie


Cloverleaf profile image

Cloverleaf 5 years ago from Calgary, AB, Canada

Peg, I wasn't around in the 60's so thank you for taking me on this journey back in time. Long gone are the days of getting a can of coke for 10 cents! Voted up, up, up!


lmmartin profile image

lmmartin 5 years ago from Alberta and Florida

You're better than a time machine. I couldn't have been further away from the Keys back then -- Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada -- but most of what you share here is very familiar. Thanks. Lynda


John 5 years ago

1965: Yup, that's right, I got more street time in the 59 chevy convertible! I was a guy and two years older! Who cares that the car got 8 miles to the gallon when gas was 31 cents a gallon? At least before the Cuban Missile Crisis, life was quieter and more carefree. Key West life as a kid was totally blissful. It actually was a preview to the scene when I moved my family of four to an island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean in 1979 called Kwajalein for a three year adventure, but that is a story for a different time.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hi there Mckbirdbooks - And a fine Sunday to you as well. So glad you came over to share a few dusty memories of how life used to be. Hubby says the bottles were 3 cents in California too. But the large glass bottles brought 5 cents. Wa hoo! And we went everywhere on our bikes, like you said, so long as we were home by supper. You take care, now.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

SubRon7, you don't look a day older than thirty nine. So you were a Navy guy. Bet that expanded your horizons. My Dad was a lifer putting in 20 plus years. I left all that stuff out about the Navy base in Key West. Oh well, another day. Thank you for dropping in and for sharing part of your story. Peg


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hi Sunnie,

Yes! It was called 4-Square! I had forgotten. Thanks so much. Rode my bike to school and all around the neighborhood too. It seemed safer somehow. You may remember bicycle locks that were two prongs that poked through the spokes with a lock that slid onto the end.

Glad you stopped by today.

Peg


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Cloverleaf, You're great. Thanks for reading about the times when dirt was still young. I imagine you have a few stories of your own to share. Hope they were happy ones. The price of things today, oh boy. Why I remember when you could buy . . .


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hey Lynda, Thanks! It's good to know we share common things in our childhood despite our distances and locations where we grew up. So nice to see you here.


Sunnie Day 5 years ago

lol I do remember those locks and banana seats..Do you know my favorite game of all times and I was pretty good at it..JACKS! I actually bought some but now they are those big plastic weird ones ...I wanted to teach my granddaughter..she loved the game..I looked on line and you can buy the metal ones still..I just might have to buy me some..hahaha


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Sunnie, My Mom loved to play jacks with me, both of us sitting on the Terrazzo floor. We had the real metal kind of jacks that came with a little red ball that my dog Trixie liked to steal. Try looking on eBay - I sold some old toys out there some time back including an old metal telephone in red with a string cord. So nice to see you.


Frank Atanacio profile image

Frank Atanacio 5 years ago from Shelton

you've really highlighted that era wonderfully written :) Up and awesome


b. Malin profile image

b. Malin 5 years ago

THanks for a Wonderful Memory Tour with Music and Trivia for those of us who were "Flower children" and danced to that Music. Lots, and Lots to relate to and Enjoy and Remember... those were Fun Years! Thanks, Peg.


Rosemay50 profile image

Rosemay50 5 years ago from Hawkes Bay - NewZealand

Ah those were the days.

I remember the refunds on the bottles when you returned them. And spending summer days with friends wandering where we pleased without fear of strangers. Yes the transistor radio and my first record player. Sitting in the bath with my new jeans on until they shrunk to fit snug tight, walking a round until they dried and needing a friend to help you get out of them And bouffont hairstyles, trying to get it up as high as possible then in later years I too used to iron my hair straight on the ironing board .

I remember the Beatles and the day President Kennedy died and the whole world cried.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hi John, I would love to hear, see and read more about your adventures in Kwajalein. It sounds so much like Key West, where we had so much fun. Remember the swamps? And jumping out of the Mahogany tree?

My brother, thanks for taking time to read and comment on this hub.

Love you,

Peg


Dim Flaxenwick profile image

Dim Flaxenwick 5 years ago from Great Britain

Oh Man!!!! I´d forgotten the white lipstick....great memories , stirred up here, along with the shock and sadness I remember when J.F.K. was murdered.

Great hub. Thank you.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 5 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

Our senior trip was also to DC! Great Hub.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Frank, Thank you so much for your nice words.

b. Malin, Hey. Cool and groovy. Flower children and flower power! Doing our sixties dances like Nancy Sinatra or Goldie Hawn. Neato. I always knew you were cool. Peace.

Rosemay50, Wish I had known you then. I didn't know how to shrink my jeans other than washing them a million times. "Mini skirts, the current thing, unh hunh. Troops just keep on marchin off to war."

What a trip. Thanks for dropping in and for sharing your part.


FloraBreenRobison profile image

FloraBreenRobison 5 years ago

Mom was a teenager in the sixties. She grew up in the Okanogan (British Columbia). She feels a lot of nostalgia for the decade. She has told about being in class when she found out about JFK.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hi FloraBreen,

It seems that the sixties have a special place in the hearts of many. Nice to know that your Mom shared some of those memories with you. Some were happy times and others were sad like the passing of JFK and the toll of the war in VietNam.

Thanks for sharing about your Mom.

Peg


thebluestar profile image

thebluestar 5 years ago from Northern Ireland

Hi Peg, memories, oh so sweet. Where have those great days gone when you could ride your bike safely around the block and had no fear of accepting a sweet from a neighbour? Now you are far safer driving an armoured tank and wearing a suit of armour lol not to mention having a thick skin for the barrage of insults that fly your way. I was born in 57 but going to school in the 60s was one of the best times in my life. Thank you for the stroll down memory lane. x


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hello there Dim

Oh man, we used to say that alot too. Oh, man. White lipstick, how unflattering! But we looked cool. With our ragged jeans dragging the ground all tattered and torn. Way cool.

Hello there TheBluestar,

Bike riding is what kept us active and strong, tanned and immune; drinking out of hoses and climbing trees; mowing yards for extra money, playing outside. It is a different world now. Nice to see you today. x Peg


Aley Martin profile image

Aley Martin 5 years ago from Sumner, Washington,USA

I write of this stuff all the time! I grew up in the New England town of Derry, NH. And I loved being a child of this time.


MonetteforJack profile image

MonetteforJack 5 years ago from Tuckerton, NJ

Hello, Peg! I love your hub here. My husband Jack also tells me stories from the 50's and 60's. It truly make me wish to be born at that time. I was born in 1967, more of the disco era ;) mckbirdbks' right in writing that reading your hub is "like a mini vacation" and thebluestar is also right in commenting that your hub is "a stroll down memory lane" and she thanked you for that. Nice! I, too, want to thank you for sharing such good past of America. What you wrote was exactly what my father told me when I was little. Thanks and really you wrote good!


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hello MonetteforJack,

Your sweet comments are so thoughtful. Thank you for sharing about your dear Dad and his stories, as well as the stories from your husband, Jack.

I'm always delighted to see Mckbirdbks' comments - he is such a sweet one. And his sisterthat too! Of course, I'm ever honored that thebluestar stops in to comment too! She is getting quite famous you know.

I hope you'll drop by again and I'll be reading more about you too!

Peg


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hi Aley Martin,

Derry NH sounds like a cool place to grow up. I see we've had many experiences in common. Thank you for stopping in here.

Peg


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hello WillStarr! So nice to see you. Wow, sometimes I think we went to the same high school. How funny that your senior trip was to DC as well. Thanks for stopping in and I love your stories!

Peg


Barbsbitsnpieces profile image

Barbsbitsnpieces 5 years ago from Napoleon, Henry County, Ohio, USA

@PegCole...This is a great idea for a Hub and very well done! Oh, that Senior trip to Washington D.C. and New York City! (Lots of Seniors went to D.C.!) Drive-in movies! Playing Jacks at recess in school hours! The great camping excursions with family!

Born in 1946, graduated in 1964, my classmates and I went to JFK's gravesite in the spring of '64. Except for going through that terrible experience, the 1950s and 1960s rocked for me, and I never smoked any of that funny stuff! I loved growing up on a small farm near my small hometown of Holgate, Ohio and the solid family outings and the "funny papers" on quiet Sunday afternoons!

And so much more! Thanks for this doing this Hub!


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Barbs, Thank you. Funny papers, yep, the Sunday Funnies were the best, laying flat on the floor to read the Sunday newspaper - boy that day is gone!

Now it's the iPod hunch squinting to see what's on the tiny screen. LOL. We did play Jacks at recess and tether ball and jump rope and teter-toter and play on the merry-go-round.

Your hometown of Holgate OH sounds solid and family oriented. We need more of that kind of upbringing.

Thanks for visiting and for your nice comments.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 5 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

As kid in Iowa, we would get out the Sunday comics, turn on the radio, and listen to a local station personality read the comics to his own kids, as we followed along. What fun that was, and thank you for bringing back that memory!


CMerritt profile image

CMerritt 5 years ago from Pendleton, Indiana

Peg, this was a fun hub....I also rode my bike and collected pop bottles. We watched the apollo missions from a small TV in the middle of our GYM every time they took of or landed....and we started each school day off with the pledge and a prayer.

Thanks for the memories...

:)


Maralexa profile image

Maralexa 5 years ago from Vancouver, Canada and San Jose del Cabo, Mexico

Hi Peg. Great hub, wonderful memories. You have no idea how strongly many incidents in the US affected us in Canada. I too can remember being in class when they announced the JFK shooting. We were allowed to go home. Many of us were that upset. But along with this shared tragedy are many, many wonderful memories of growing up in the 60s and 70s.

Thanks for the hub.


pwill profile image

pwill 5 years ago

You have a wonderful post. I'll go one step further and say like Jimmy Durante once said, "thanks for the memories."


Will Apse profile image

Will Apse 5 years ago

The most wonderful thing for me in the sixties was being allowed to ride my bike more or less anywhere (before dark). For a ten year old, finding any kind of unusual or out of the way place was a great adventure. I remember my excitement when we found a small ice cream factory down a secluded lane. An ice cream factory. Wow!


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 5 years ago from Chicago

Probably the last good decade of America—at least the first half of it. But for most of us, it was all good. I do remember Nehi, moon pies, and RC Cola. The music is great! Thanks for the memories. I really enjoyed this stroll down memory lane with you. :)


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hello James,

I think of my Dad talking about when his Father first heard songs like "Mares eat oats and does eat oats but little lambs eat ivey," he thought all the good sense in the world had been lost. That wasn't music, it was just noise and no sensible person would ever listen to it. Imagine what he would think of today's music.

It is strange to think of my youthful times as gone since they live so clear in my memories. Thanks for sharing those times with me.

All the best,

Peg


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hey Will Starr,

How fun to read the comics along with a radio personality and what a great way to get kids to learn to read. I was thinking just recently about Dick Tracy and Peanuts being the first page of the Sunday paper. Thanks for adding that nice touch to these memories. I can always count on you to share something nifty.


Breen Bergstrome 5 years ago

Hi PegCole17,

I had an aunt named Peg. I can identify with you as I too spend time with my 93 year-old mum and try to keep alive the days when life was exciting and active.

I was a child of the 60's as well.

The whole period is so vivid as though it were only yesterday. 10 cents for a cup of coffee, a dime for a chocolate bar, 25 cents for a glass of beer in the pubs.

Being wild and different was becoming popular as the hippie movement grew, and for the first time in my young life I LOVED having red hair.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hello C. Merritt, Thank you for your nice words a few weeks back and sorry for the delay in responding. Vacation has come and gone along with my memory. Yep, we would all gather in the cafeteria (they called it the cafetorium) and watch the tiny TV for the Apollo launches. Ah, a pledge and a prayer - how we need that daily affirmation nowdays.

Hey there Maralexa - same excuse. I went on vacation and my mind never came back. It is always good to hear about how news in the US affects those in other countries like yourself in Canada. JFK was truly well loved all over the world. Thank you for your nice remarks and for dropping in.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hi Pwill - Sorry for the delay. My apologies, I'm just getting caught up after vacation. Yeah, I loved Jimmy Durante too! Haa Cha Cha. Nice to see you here.

Will Apse, I dreamed that I already responded to you and when I checked it was just a dream. So sorry, my fault. Amazing discovery, an ice cream factory. What a kid's fantasy. Mmmmmm. Makes me hungry.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hello there Breen! So nice to meet you after reading your daughter's work. She is so talented as are you. It is an honor to have you here on this hub. Thank you so much for stopping in.

The Summer of Love and Flower Children and Peace and Love, boy do I miss those days. So nice that you have your Mom and that you spend time with her. You had red hair? How cool! Again, thanks for commenting.


Susan S Spencer profile image

Susan S Spencer 5 years ago from UK

This was a great trip down memory lane Peg. Thank you.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hi Susan,

Thanks for riding along on the journey. Nice to meet you here. Peg


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 5 years ago from New York

Great memories for me too, thanks for sharing. We had a senior trip to Washington, DC but no singing it was just our senior trip. We actually crammed about 60 girls into one hotel room! It was a blast. Loved your hub and voted up.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hi Tillsontitan,

We had about 30 girls in our room at any given time, screeching, laughing, pinching, giggling, crying, blow-drying all at the same time. Hahaha. What fun!

Thanks for stopping in to share!


Zabbella profile image

Zabbella 5 years ago from NJ-USA

Oh my! The Dippedy Do with the large curlers! The small transistor radio with the miserable sound. Yes, the Beatles on Ed Sullivan Show..(remember Lawrence Welk?)Wow!

I had teenage sisters who used to take me to some of the parties. Oh my!

I remember playing "spin the bottle" on our trip to Washington! What fun! Yes, there were boys in the room.


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 4 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

Peg- Peg- Peg,

I am utterly enamored with this hub and I thank you. For me to sit still and slack jawed for 12 minutes... I LOVE LOVED the 8 minutes of some of the best music ever made, making me tear up with the ever beautiful YESTERDAY at the end. And that Adam Lambert CAN sing when he is not acting foolish, what a beautiful rendition of Brigadoon.

This is getting bookmarked and will be listened to frequently, like when I am putting my 'Dippety-do' in/ stuff like that!

Congratulations on your "100" score!

Voted UP & across the board. Hugs, Maria


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hello Zabbella - Ed Sullivan, Ed Sullivan! Of course. Have you ever seen the movie "Bye Bye Birdie" with Paul Lynde? Ed Sullivan was the best show on Sunday nights. And Topo Gigio was great too! We weren't allowed to watch the episode with Elvis since he was so "vulgar" according to my parents. But I did see the Beatles' performance. It was hard to hear with all the girls screaming. And me too. Thank you for the comment and my bad for the delay. Senior moments of forgetfullness.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Maria dahling, Come on over and we'll spin some 45s on the record player. I have some "Get Set" so we can roll our hair and sit under my portable dryer with the plastic cap. We'll "borrow" my sister's diary and read it by flashlight in the closet where I keep the comic books hidden.

I haven't really followed Adam Lambert but when I heard this rendition of Brigadoon I couldn't resist putting it on here. So glad you enjoyed the music tribute. Just a taste of those good times. You make me smile.


charfaris profile image

charfaris 4 years ago

Thanks for the memories. I enjoyed this very much. I graduated from High School in '70 so much of this is very familiar.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Thank you Charfaris, We went to school together then about the same time frame. Listened to the same songs, wore the same styles. Nice to meet you here and thanks so much for stopping by.


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 4 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

I don't know. Sis, we might be better off reading those comic books!

You would love Adam Lambert, I think... he does a fabulous Elvis... he really has some decent talent, just gets a little carried away at times.

OK, see you at the Cafe and I need to do make some peanut brittle today. Wanted to hear this awesome music again before I started my day. Love, Maria


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Yeah, we'll definitely get into trouble otherwise. Here's an Archie comic you haven't seen. Let me have a little chunk of that peanut brittle? I haven't made any in years! Yummo. Thanks for listening to the music. I love it too. Love back your way, Peg


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 4 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

Sista,

Please e-mail me your address and I will send you a samplin'... it's about the only thing I can make that won't kill you!

OMG, I just heard they arrested Adam Lambert in Finland. I need to get digging to find out why... that's what I mean, stick to singing man!

See you at 'my' Christmas hub where I have blatantly pirated your expression . Love, Maria


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California)

Thanks for helping me recall so many memories, Peg.

The glass soda bottles...two cents for the small, five cents for the large.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Send the goods Maria, I love peanut brittle. Once I made it with raw peanuts by mistake. Oops, green brittle. Yuck. Will be over to see you at your Christmas hub. I've been off line with house guests in and other medical goings on. But, another story in that - Worker's Compensation - issues. Oh, brother. Hope your Christmas was lovely. See you soon.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Daisy my darling. You are sweet to stop in and remember with me. Yes, two cents for the small and five cents for the large. Hah, large! Now "large" is the "Roughrider size" at 42 oz. How can someone drink a pitcher of soda? Oh my.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California)

Peg,

With all the troubles in the world today, don't you sometimes wish you could go back to the 60s?


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moonlake 4 years ago from America

Enjoyed your hub. You had a 1959 Chevrolet Impala Convertible. I loved the 1959 Chevrolet Impala. We once owned a white one.

I remember the Cuban Missile Crisis. We had just married my husband and Dad both in the military. Both had to head for the base. The rest of us sitting in front of the tv waiting for what was coming next.

Enjoyed your hub.


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PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hi Daisy - We had our share of troubles back then, but it is so much fun to remember the good times. It did seem like a kinder more innocent time. Mostly I miss feeling as young as I did then - fresh and new without the cynicism learned through the decades. Ah yes. I would go back if I could know then what I know now.


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PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hi Moonlake - The 59 Chevy Convertible was my means of transportation in a time when gasoline was only 33 cents a gallon. You know how powerful those motors were back then. Vroom vroom. I could get three gallons of gas for a dollar and make it to school, work and back home for one day.

The Cuban Missle Crisis was a difficult time living in the Keys. The Army came in with their huge rumbling trucks and artillery rolling down the street (Flagler Ave.) in front of our house for hours and hours, deep into the night. We were just 90 miles from Cuba. It was a scary time for all. You, having been in a military family (twice) you were sure to feel it. So nice to see you today.


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 4 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

'Green brittle'? Well, that just 'burns my biscuits', Sista! Never fear, the real stuff will be sent your way soon...

Good luck with the grim task of dealing with WC. I am sending extra hugs your way! Love you, Maria


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PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Green brittle would be good for St. Patty's day if anyone would dare eat it. Hah.

On the other issue, we are taking another tack in hopes for some much needed relief. This has been so frustrating and ridiculuous. An absolute sham.


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 4 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

Sista, Did you get my e-mail yesterday? Love, Maria


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PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hello Sista, Ya vohl I did indeed. And what a pleasant surprise it was to hear directly from you. Sent you a response but I owe you a longer note. Here's an IOU. IOU


sweetzara profile image

sweetzara 4 years ago from Mumbai, India

Hi PegCole12

This is such a fascinating and beautiful read. What a beautiful and peaceful place to grow up in. Here in India, we still get coke in bottles and I can swear that it tastes so much better, I always look for coke in a bottle whenever I travel but now am able to find it in fewer and fewer places. It is amazing how every place is so different yet so similar. I really enjoyed reading this.


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 4 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

Hi Sista,

Wanted to swing by to say HI, that I am thinking of you and hubby and to take another listen to your amazing music.

I just watched DWTS on Monday PM and the dancers performed to MOTOWN with The Temps, Smokey and Martha Reeves (who sadly is not sounding real good). This music is one of a kind, just like you! Love, Maria


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PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hello and welcome Sweetzara, Thanks for your visit. I always enjoy hearing about other countries and the memories that people had growing up in other places. You are right about Coke tasting so much better in the cold glass bottle. Nothing at all like drinking from a tin can. There is a retro trend here in the states where you can get the little green bottles again but they are costly compared to the plastic. Again, I'm so glad to see you here today and hope to visit your work as well.

Peg


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PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Darling Maria, I'm always grateful for a visit from you and it makes me take the time to go back and read over my work and reread the lovely comments that people make. Motown and the Temptations, Smokey and Martha Reeves are a few that I left off here. So much music, so little time. Here's hoping I'll catch you for breakfast at the Cafe before you're off to your busy day.

Love you. Peg


mckbirdbks profile image

mckbirdbks 4 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

Hello Peg. Nice new avatar. This is such a special hub. Glad the fresh comments drew me back here.


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PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hey there Mike. Thanks for the return visit to this hub. I found some more old pictures and added them recently, like my old 59 Chevy, so I'm glad you took another look. As always, it's good to see you here. You made my day. Glad you like the new avatar! Peg


mckbirdbks profile image

mckbirdbks 4 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

Hi Peg. My first car $250.00 1960 Ford Falcon station wagon. Perhaps the least cool car ever manufactured by Ford. The car had approximately one year of life left in it when I purchased it in 1969. Lol


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PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Mike, I think that takes the award for the third least cool car in high school. First was a guy in my senior class who drove a hearse to school everyday, second was my whale of a 59 Chevy Impala, then your Ford Falcon. Totally square Daddio. Did we go to the same HS? LOL


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 4 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

Barging in like it's the Cafe to say.....hey, what about my "first"... a lemon colored 1981 Mercury Zephyr that my cool bro gave me a "really good deal on" for $200... oh the repair bills!

Sista, I also love your avatar... you are so cool! Will return your lovely reply soon. Hugs, Maria


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PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Barge away my darling. I love your visits and it gives me an opportunity to hit the play button on my own video. Is that like tooting your own horn? I hope not. I love the music. I wanna disco. On the disco isle...

A Mercury Zephyr? How uncool.


mckbirdbks profile image

mckbirdbks 4 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

1981 Mercury Zephyr. A 1981 car, was your first car. Now I am feeling old for sure. I am going to have to look up a Zephyr.


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PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Ooooh, Mar. Check out the 1939 Mercury Zephyr. That was way cool. I looked at Google images to find out what they looked like. The 80s ones were kinda big and square. Me Too, Mck. In 81, well nevermind.


mckbirdbks profile image

mckbirdbks 4 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

Funny I just looked up a 1981 Mercury Zephyr and it was not terrible. The Ford Falcon was terrible.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Mck, I just looked up a 1960 Ford Falcon Station wagon and it is so uncool that it's really Cool. Man, it's so bad it's good. BTW. We had a 1959 Rambler Station wagon and it was REALLY uncool. I wanted Mom to drop me off a couple of blocks away from school so no one would see it.


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 4 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

Oh, trust me, you two sweethearts... this "ole Zephyr was a heffer"... it was pretty terrible! LOL, I felt very "square" when I was driving that thing! I will check out the 1939, Sista!

Peggy, I love when something is so uncool that it's cool! OMG, Dad had a neon blue Rambler... but it didn't like to ramble so much... I couldn't tell you the year.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Mar, Sometimes I think we were raised in the same family and just have a case of amnesia. Sista, is that YOU? We also had a '64 Rambler American that my brother totalled. He was okay, just minor cuts and bruises. The Zephyr was a heffer, how funny!


mckbirdbks profile image

mckbirdbks 4 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

I am pretty sure the 'Rambler Wagon' I had was a 1964. Seems about right, I owned it in 1973. Drove to El Paso, Ft. Bliss, and back again 8 months later. Beautiful country around there.


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PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Mck, "Out in the West Texas town of El Paso...". Here's one for you this morning. http://youtu.be/GgI5DMVegIk

As kids,we went to the drive in with our parents. We watched the movie lying on top of the Rambler wagon. Hahaha Good times. There's a hub by Marcy Goodfleisch called Eegah about drive in movies. It's a good one and so is she.


dalton71482 profile image

dalton71482 4 years ago from Tennessee

It's so interesting hearing about times past. I often find myself longing for a time when I could leave the house without a call from work. Or going cruising in the car just cause it was the cool thing to do. It seems that even as a kid I had to worry about gas prices when I wanted to go out. You've made it seem like such a laid back point in time. I'm jealous because I'm too young to have lived it. And I can't imagine what my kids are in for over the next sixty year. Anyways enjoyed the history lesson thank you for writing it. voted up


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 4 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

Dear Sista,

I was in the mood for a little Marty Robbins after laughing at the Cafe this morning with the Elvis that Becky shared... now I'm feeling mellow and nostalgic again.

Thanks, girlfriend! Hugs, Maria


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Down in the West Texas town of El Paso...

Mellow and nostalgic is good. Funny and laughing is too! I'll have to check out the Elvis one that Becky shared. I sent you a sweet story on fB on a website that I follow.

Hugs your way

Peg


snakeslane profile image

snakeslane 4 years ago from Canada

Peg, Your archive of old photos is such a treasure. What a nostalgic look back at the baby boomer in full bloom. I was experiencing very similar rites of passage including the ironing and the curling of the hair (oh those stinky 'Toni' home permanents). We went from pin curls to brush rollers (ouch!) and everything in between. It was a blessed day when the sponge rollers were invented. It seems now we had a lot of time on our hands for wandering around looking groovy. I wonder about that now because in reality I always had a job (babysitting, cleaning, dishwashing at the Chinese cafe across the street) and then doing all that again later at home. We packed a lot of living into those hours and somehow always managed to look fabulous, ah the energy of youth. Your choir trip to Washington must have been exciting. Really enjoyed the look back Peg, hope to see more. Regards, snakeslane


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hello Snakeslane. Thanks for sharing my memories and yep, baby boomer. Seems like childhood passed so quickly and too soon I was working like you were but at the Five and Dime then the grocery store as a checker. We still had time to groove to the music. Oh how I wish I had the energy from those days when nine pm still seemed early!

So nice to have you visit these old photos, S'Lane. It made me take another look at the hub and to add a few new pictures. Thanks for the inspiration to edit. I updated the video so hopefully it plays now!

Hope to see you later for coffee.

Peg


snakeslane profile image

snakeslane 4 years ago from Canada

Peg, Omg! I have the exact same conch shell, my parents brought back from one of their trips. The Poinciana tree photo does not come acros very clearly but maybe it's my screen? Not sure. I liked the palm tree photo you had. How's that for a critique? I had a transistor radio glued to my ear most nights too, same bad connection, poor reception lol.


mckbirdbks profile image

mckbirdbks 4 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

I saw a comment show up on this wonderful wandering down memory lane. What a fine way to spend a few minutes.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hey there S'Lane. I appreciate the candor on the Poinciana tree photo. It was from an old photo from the 70s I scanned in. Not good quality. So I replaced it with this one and will add back one with the palm trees. My windows just crashed so I'll post this comment before it enters a black hole. Thanks for the input. Really!


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Hi Mike. Indeed, a stroll down memory lane. Thanks for the company. I really enjoy re reading these when people stop in. As host at the Emerald Wells I'm sure you know the feeling of friends dropping by to share a few moments. Thanks so much.


snakeslane profile image

snakeslane 4 years ago from Canada

Peg, I like the boulevard photo with the big tree and the sidewalk kind of running off into the sunlit hills beyond. It's got that mood of discovery about it. Good choice! And I didn't say (because I enjoyed all the photos) the one of your Mom and you and Trixie is so special. I could feel the love! Good to see you today. I am a little worried about this 'black hole' business. Hope you get it worked out.


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PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas Author

Trixie was my little sister from the time I was four till I was seventeen, my very first doggie. I still dream about her. Thanks for telling me you liked that pic. Me too. We took groceries to the girls today (Mom and her sister) and they are both so sweet, always grateful for the little things. I tell my Mom about things we did back then and she loves revisiting the memories. Good to see you too S'Lane. I've missed being here. Hope all is well there.

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    Peg Cole (PegCole17)1,335 Followers
    72 Articles

    Peg is the daughter of a military officer who served in the US Navy. She grew up in a variety of cities throughout the southeastern U.S..



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