Concluding 14 of 14 Parts: George Peabody (1795-1869), A-Z Handbook, Near-Forgotten Hero...

Concluding 14 of 14 Parts: George Peabody (1795-1869): A-Z Handbook of the Massachusetts-Born Merchant in the South, London-Based Banker, and Philanthropist’s Life, Influence, and Related People, Places, Events, and Institutions. By Franklin Parker & Betty J. Parker, bfparker@frontiernet.net


This work updates and expands Franklin Parker,
George Peabody, A Biography (Nashville, Tenn.: Vanderbilt Univ. Press, ©1971, revised with illustrations ©1995), and the authors’ related George Peabody publications. Note: To read on your computer most pages of Franklin Parker’s out-of-print George Peabody, A Biography, 1995, as a free Google E-book copy and paste on your browser: http://books.google.com/books?id=OPIbk-ZPnF4C&pg=PP1&lpg=PR4&dq=Franklin+Parker,+George+Peabody,+a+Biography&output=html&sig=6R8ZoKwN1B36wtCSePijnLaYJS8


Background:
Why these 1 to 14 blogs on George Peabody? The authors attended George Peabody College for Teachers, Nashville (renamed Peabody College of Vanderbilt Univ. July 1, 1979).Franklin Parker’s doctoral dissertation, “George Peabody, Founder of Modern Philanthropy,” 1956, has been an ongoing research and writing interest for over 50 years. The authors’ intent is to perpetuate public memory of him.


George Peabody, now largely forgotten by scholars and the public, was significant as: 1-a Massachusetts-born merchant in the U.S. South, beginning as junior partner in Riggs, Peabody & Co. (1814-29); then head of Peabody, Riggs & Co. (1829-43), importing dry goods and other commodities worldwide for sale to U.S. wholesalers.
He transformed himself from merchant into: 2-a London-based merchant-banker, George Peabody & Co. (1838-64), which helped finance the B&O RR, the 2nd Mexican War Loan, the Atlantic Cable, and by choosing Junius Spencer Morgan (1813-90) as partner Oct. 1, 1854, was a root of the JP Morgan international banking firm.


Merchant-turned-banker George Peabody finally became:
3-the best known U.S. philanthropist of the 1850s-60s, founding the Peabody Homes of London for the working poor; founder in the U.S. of 7 Peabody Libraries and Lecture Halls; the Peabody Conservatory of Music, Baltimore; three Peabody Museums at Harvard (Anthropology), Yale (Paleontology), and the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA (maritime history); and founder of the Peabody Education Fund for the South (1867-1914), a model for all later larger U.S. funds and foundations.


Two tributes to George Peabody:


Historian John Steele Gordon called George Peabody the “Most Underrated Philanthropist….
Peabody is unjustly forgotten today, but his unprecedented generosity was greatly appreciated in his time.” Ref.: American Heritage. Vol. 50, No. 3 (May-June 1999), pp. 68-69.


“The Peabody Fund, established in 1867 by George Peabody to assist southern education, is often credited with being the first foundation….”
Ref.: Reader’s Companion to American History, ed. by Eric Foner and John A. Garraty (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1991). Internet: http://HistoryChannel.com/


End of Background.
HTML symbols are intended for blogging (ignore). This concluding Part 14 of 14 Parts covers from: References. Newspapers, New York Daily Times, Sept. 24, 1856 to End of Manuscript.


New York Daily Times, Sept. 24, 1856, p. 1, c. 5 (GP declined public dinner offered by NYC delegation greeting him on his arrival on the Atlantic, Sept. 15, 1856, after nearly 20 years’ absence in London.
He explained that he had promised to be greeted first publicly by his hometown friends in South Danvers, Mass.).


New York Times, Oct. 10, 1856, p. 1, c. 3 and Oct. 11, 1856, p. 2, c. 1-5 (Danvers, Mass., Oct. 9, 1856, reception for GP on his first U.S. visit after 20 years’ absence in London; also in Proceedings, 1856, pp. 115-119, under References: books, entry above).


New York Times, Oct. 14, 1856, p. 2, c. 4 (GP’s $10,000 science equipment gift for 1853-55 Second U.S. Grinnell Expedition’s search for lost British Arctic explorer Sir John Franklin; similar to Washington, D.C., Daily National Intelligencer, Feb. 1, 1853, p. 3, c. 4, entry above).


New York Daily Times, Oct. 23, 1856, p. 4, c. 3 (Danvers, Mass., Oct. 9, 1856, reception for GP on his first U.S. visit after 20 years’ absence in London; also in Proceedings, 1856, pp. 115-119, under References: books, entry above).


New York Daily Times, Feb. 4, 1857, p. 1, c. 2 (Public receptions and speeches which accompanied GP’s Sept. 15, 1856-Aug. 19, 1857, U.S. visit after nearly 20 years in London, included two in Baltimore, Jan. 30, 1857, at the Md. Historical Society; and Feb. 2, 1857, at the Md. Institute; before his Feb. 12, 1857, PIB founding letter).


New York Daily Times, Aug. 12, 1857, p. 1, c. 6 (Elaborate farewell banquet, Aug. 10, 1857, at William Shepard Wetmore’s fashionable Newport, R.I., home, nine days before GP left NYC, Aug. 19, 1857, to return to England; similar to NYC Evening Post, Aug. 12, 1857, p. 1; and R.I. Newport Mercury, Aug. 15, 1857).


New York Times, Feb. 9, 1858, p. 4, c. 6. (To correct late Dec. 1857 press report of his firm’s Bank of England loan in the Panic of 1857,
GP wrote the editor that he owed creditors ƒ2.3 million [not ƒ30 million as reported] when he applied for a ƒ800,000 loan, but took only ƒ300,000, and that at the time of the loan, he had paid ƒ1.5 million of the ƒ2.3 million he owed creditors.“Our losses,” he wrote, “will be but trifling”).


New York Times, Feb. 18, 1858, p. 4, c. 6 (GP wrote the New York Times editor again to correct late Dec. 1857 press report of his firm’s Bank of England loan in the Panic of 1857.
GP wrote that he had secured the loan not on securities, which the charter of the Bank of England forbade, but on English friends who guaranteed ƒ90,000 of his firm’s ƒ300,000 loan).


New York Times, Aug. 4, 1858, p. 2, c. 1-2 (GP’s July 9, 1858, Crystal Palace dinner for 50 Americans, including U.S. Minister to Britain G.M. Dallas and family, Baltimorean John Pendleton Kennedy, and London Times editor Marmaduke Blake Sampson).


New York Times, Aug. 8, 1858, p. 2, c. 1-2 (GP’s July 22, 1858, dinner, toasts, speeches, Star and Garter, Richmond near London, attended by 30 Britons and 60 Americans, with U.S. Minister to France John Young Mason as guest of honor, and guests including Baltimorean John Pendleton Kennedy and New York Times founder and first editor Henry Jarvis Raymond).


New York Times, Jan. 12, 1860, p. 1, c. 6 (Reprinted GP’s Dec. 23, 1859, letter to the Baltimore American editor denying rumor of a rift between himself and his partner J.S. Morgan after the Panic of 1857, denying the charge made of GP using the London Timesto attack rivals, and denying other allegations and inaccuracies, made in Editor James Gordon Bennett’s New York Herald, Sept. 20, 1859, p. 2, c. 2; and Oct. 12, 1859, p. 2, c. 2).


New York Times, May 23, 1861, p. 1, c. 1 (Report that Confederate emissary Ambrose Dudley
Mann tried to get GP to sell Confederate bonds to European investors but was “firmly repulsed”).


New York Times, April 9, 1862, p. 8, c. 5; and p. 9, c. 2 (Editorial and British press favorable reaction to GP’s March 12, 1862, $750,000 gift for housing London’s working poor).`


New York Times, March 15, 1866, p. 4, c. 5 (GP’s second gift of $500,000 to Peabody Donation Fund for London housing, April 19, 1866.
GP’s total gift, 1862-69, $2.5 million).


New York Times, April 16, 1866, p. 1, c. 4; and April 27, 1866, p. 1, c. 6 (Queen Victoria’s March 28, 1866, letter to GP thanking him for his March 12, 1862, Peabody Donation Fund, London, to build apartments for London’s working poor; and stating that she was having a miniature portrait of herself especially painted for him.
Also, GP’s April 3, 1866, reply to Queen Victoria).


New York Times, May 1, 1866 (GP present at the prize-giving ceremony of the Workingmen’s Industrial Exhibition, London).


New York Times, May 3, 1866, p. 4, c. 6; and p. 11, c. 1 (GP arrived in NYC on his May 1, 1866 to May 1, 1867, U.S. visit).


New York Times, June 20, 1866, p. 2, c. 6 (GP’s correspondence with Boston citizens).


New York Times, Oct. 21, 1866, p. 4, c. 5 (Peabody Museum of Harvard Univ. gift, $150,000).


New York Times, Oct. 23, 1866, p.1, c. 6 (GP’s additional $500,000 gift to the PIB on Oct. 19, 1866).


New York Times, Oct. 24, 1866, p. 4, c. 7 (Peabody Museum of Yale Univ. gift, $150,000).


New York Times, Oct. 27, 1866, p. 4, c. 3-4 (Defense of GP by anonymous letter writer answering “S.P.Q.’s” letter printed in NYC Evening Post, Oct. 25, 1866, p. 2, c. 2, charging GP as Civil War profiteer at the Union’s expense, of not contributing to the U.S. Sanitary Commission, and of giving money to the London poor rather than money to raise and clothe a single Union recruit).


New York Times, Oct. 27, 1866, p. 4, c. 3; and p. 5, c. 1-2 (GP’s philanthropies.
Account of the PIB dedication and opening, Oct. 24-25, 1866, including speeches by GP and others).


New York Times, Oct. 31, 1866, p. 4, c. 7 (Letter writer identified as “A Twenty-Five Years’ Acquaintance” [may have been Thurlow Weed] defended GP as Union supporter against
1-”S.P.Q.’s” charges printed in NYC Evening Post, Oct. 25, 1866, p. 2, c. 2, that GP was a Civil War profiteer at the Union’s expense, that GP never contributed to the U.S. Sanitary Commission, and that he gave money to the London poor rather than money to raise and clothe a single Union recruit; and against similar charges by 2-owner-editor Samuel Bowles, Springfield Daily Republican, Oct. 27, 1866, p. 4, c. 2).


New York Times, Nov. 8, 1866, p. 1, c. 7 (GP’s $25,000 gift, Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., for professorship of math and natural science).


New York Times, Nov. 18, 1866, p. 5, c. 5 (PIB trustees’ letter of thanks to GP for his Oct. 19, 1866, additional $500,000 gift).


New York Times, Feb. 9, 1867, p. 1, c. 7; and Feb. 11, 1867 (First meeting of PEF trustees, Willard’s Hotel, Washington, D.C., Feb. 8, 1867; and other facts about PEF $l million gift).


New York Times, March 9, 1867, p. 1, c. 5 (On Congressional gold medal to GP in thanks for the PEF, similar to New York Herald, May 29, 1868, p. 3, c. 6, entry above).


New York Times, March 26, 1867, p. 8, c. 1 (Meeting of PEF trustees).


New York Times, April 1, 1867, p.1, c. 6 (Description of Queen Victoria’s gift to GP of her portrait by British artist F.A.C. Tilt, a photo of which in miniature was enameled on porcelain and set in a gold frame; seen by GP March 1867, deposited in specially built vault, Peabody Institute Library, Peabody, Mass., since April 28, 1868).


New York Times, April 9, 1867, p. 5, c. 3 (GP’s reply to invitation from Charleston, S.C. board of trade).


New York Times, April 21, 1867, p. 1, c. 7 (PEF proposed plan to aid public education in the eleven former Confederate states plus W.Va., added because of its poverty).


New York Times, April 21,
1867, p. 6, c. 1-2 (GP’s April 18, 1867, farewell speech in Georgetown, Mass.: “Here, since the earliest days of New England, my maternal ancestors lived and died.More of my family connections live here now than any other place. More than sixty years ago, I distinctly remember, a promised visit to Rowley was one of my brightest anticipations.Here my mother was born, she whom I loved so much, whose memory I revere. Here she passed her childhood and therefore these scenes are to me consecrated ground”).


New York Times, May 8, 1867, p. 5, c. 2-3 (On GP’s April 2, 1867, $15,000 gift for a Georgetown, D.C. library fund; similar to D.C.,Georgetown Courier, March 2, 1867, p. 3, c. 1, entry above).


New York Times, Jan. 11, 1868, p. 5, c. 2 (John Greenleaf Whittier later wrote that he would not have written “Memorial Hymn,” a poem read Jan. 8, 1868, at the dedication of Memorial Church, Georgetown, Mass., GP built in his mother’s memory in her hometown, had he known of GP’s condition, that the church “exclude political and other subjects not in keeping with its religious purpose.”
See Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, entry above).


New York Times, May 26, 1868, p. 2, c. 2-3 (On Congressional gold medal to GP for the PEF, similar to New York Herald, May 29, 1868, p. 3, c. 6, entry above).


New York Times, Aug. 4, 1868, p. 2, c. 2 (Recalled details of GP’s first large-scale [over 800 guests] U.S.-British July 4, 1851, friendship dinner, Willis’s Rooms, London, in connection with the Great Exhibition, 1851, London.
GP overcame British society’s reluctance to attend by getting the Duke of Wellington as guest of honor).


New York Times, Jan. 29, 1869, p. 5, c. 5 (On Congressional gold medal to GP for the PEF, similar to New York Herald, May 29, 1868, p. 3, c. 6, entry above).


New York Times, June 9, 1869, p. 5, c. 1-2 (On GP’s arrival in NYC for his June 8 to Sept. 29, 1869, last U.S. visit; described Peabody Homes of London; article was sympathetic to GP on many begging letters sent him and the abuse heaped on him when they were unanswered).


New York Times, June 19, 1869, p. 4, c. 2 (Obituary of Henry Jarvis Raymond, founder and first editor of the New York Times, who was at GP’s July 22, 1858, dinner, Star and Garter Hotel, Richmond, near London, attended by about 60 Americans and 30 Britons.
U.S. Minister to France John Young Mason was guest of honor. H.J. Raymond toasted “the Press.” Baltimorean John Pendleton Kennedy toasted “the City of London.” See: New York Times, Aug. 8, 1858, p. 2, c.1-2, entry above).


New York Times, July 16, 1869, p. 1, c. 6 ; and July 20, 1869, p. 4, c. 7 (GP spoke at July 14-16, 1869, dedication of Peabody Institute Library, Danvers, Mass.; and Oliver Wendell Holmes read his “George Peabody” poem, July 16, 1869; similar to Peabody Press, July 14, 1869, p. 2, c. 2, 4-5, entry above).


New York Times, July 31, 1869, p. 4, c. 7; and p. 5, c. 1 (GP visited Greenbrier Hotel, White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., July 23-Aug. 30, 1869.
Former Va. Gov. H.A. Wise and others composed resolution of praise read to GP, July 28, 1869: “On behalf of the Southern people we tender thanks to Mr. Peabody for his aid to the cause of education…and hail him ‘benefactor.’” GP’s reply was also printed. GP spoke to and was photographed with Robert E. Lee, other former Civil War generals, and northern and southern educational and political leaders [Aug. 12]. A spontaneous Peabody Ball was held in his honor [Aug. 11]. Too ill to attend, he heard the merrymaking from his bungalow).


New York Times, Aug. 4, 1869, p. 2, c. 1 (GP won praise for his $15,000 loan to U.S. exhibitors at the
Great Exhibition, 1851, London, who were without U.S. congressional funds to display U.S. art and industrial products. GP was repaid by U.S. Congress three years later).


New York Times, Aug. 4, 1869, p. 5, c. 2-4 (U.S. Minister to Britain John Lothrop Motley’s remarks on July 23, 1869, unveiling of GP’s seated statue in London).


New York Times, Nov. 13, 1869, p. 3, c. 1 (Cited as source by GP funeral researcher Howard Allen Welch for U.S. Rear Adm. William Radford being instructed to send U.S. ship as GP funeral vessel.
Queen Victoria and the government decided to outfit HMS Monarch as the funeral ship; it was escorted by USSPlymouth).


New York Times, Nov. 14, 1869, p. 3, c. 7 (On GP’s Nov. 4, 1869, death in London; his family and antecedents).


New York Times, Nov. 26, 1869, p. 2, c. 2-3 (New York TimesLondon reporter wrote of GP’s Nov. 12, 1869, Westminster Abbey funeral service:
“My trans-Atlantic heart beat…quicker at the thought of clergy and nobility, Prime Minister and people, of this great realm gathered to lay [GP] among sleeping Kings and statesmen. The crowd outside was, if possible, more interesting than that within. The gaunt, famished London poor were gathered in thousands to testify their respect for the foreigner who has done more than any Englishman for their class, and whose last will contains an additional bequest to them of £150,000″).


New York Times, Nov. 27, 1869, p. 1, c. 6-7 (Bishop of London’s sermon on GP’s life and influence, Westminster Abbey, Sunday, Nov. 14, 1869).


New York Times, Dec. 14, 1869, p. 5, c. 1 (Handing over ceremony of GP’s remains from Westminster Abbey, London, to Portsmouth harbor on Dec. 11, 1869, and placing the coffin aboard HMS Monarch
for transatlantic crossing to New England).


New York Times, Dec. 22, 1869, p. 1, c. 4
(U.S. House Resolution No. 96 asked Pres. U.S. Grant to order a naval reception of GP’s remains from England on U.S. territory “with the…dignity of a great people.” This resolution was introduced in the House on Dec. 15, 1869, debated and passed on Dec. 21, 1869, passed in the Senate on Dec. 23, 1869, and signed into law by Pres. Grant on Jan. 10, 1870).


New York Times, Dec. 23, 1869, p. 2, c. 3-4 (Thurlow Weed, “The Late George Peabody; A Vindication of his Course During the Civil War,” reprinted in Historical Collections of the Danvers Historical Society, Vol. 19 [1931], pp. 9-15; similar to Weed, Thurlow-a, entry under References: books, above).


New York Times, Jan. 25, 1870, p. 5, c. 3-4 (At GP’s Nov. 4, 1869, death England’s Solicitor General had to determine the legality of his property as a foreigner.
It was determined that in 1866 GP bought through business friend and naturalized British subject Sir Curtis M. Lampson just over 13 acres of land at Stockwell near London, that he gave it in his will to the Peabody Donation Fund, that while it reverted to the Crown because he was not a British subject, the Crown in turn gave it to the Peabody Donation Fund of London).


New York Times, Jan. 27, 1870, p. 1, c. 5-7 (During his 1866-67 U.S. visit GP told friends in NYC about the only instance he made money in the Civil War involving Confederate bonds.
In London early in the Civil War some investment capitalists asked his advice about buying Confederate bonds. He said that such bonds would depreciate within a year. Doubting him, a few asked that he write down this opinion, and that whosoever was right, he or they, would win a $60,000 wager. A year later when the bonds depreciated GP held them to the wager and said that was the only money he ever made from Confederate bonds. Md. legislature’s resolutions on GP’s death, which read in part: “…his name will stand preeminent in history…generations yet unborn will learn to venerate his memory.” Robert Charles Winthrop and citizens’ committee left Boston Jan. 26, 1870, for the Portland, Me., naval reception and for the Peabody, Mass., eulogy and burial. Arrival in Portland, Me., of U.S. naval squadron to receive HMSMonarch funeral ship and accompanying USS Plymouth. Has list and history of GP’s philanthropies).


New York Times, Feb. 2, 1870, p. 5, c. 1-3 (Transfer on Jan. 29, 1870, of GP’s coffin from HMS Monarch to Portland City Hall, Me.; the many visitors on Jan. 31 to the lying in state in the Portland City Hall auditorium, specially decorated by marine artist Harrison Bird Brown; and the transfer of the coffin from Portland City Hall on Feb. 1, 1870, to a specially decorated funeral train.
The train’s route went to Kennebunk, Me.; Portsmouth, N.H.; and in Mass. to Newburyport, Ipswich, Beverly, and Peabody, Mass.).


New York Times, Feb 9, 1870, p. 1, c. 4-7 (Described Boston’s C.W. Barth and staff’s solemn decoration of the Peabody Institute Library’s main reading room for GP’s last lying in state, Peabody, Mass., Feb. 1-8, 1870.
Philanthropic advisor Robert Charles Winthrop’s widely reprinted Feb. 8, 1870, GP funeral eulogy, South Congregational Church, Peabody, Mass.: 1-how GP first shared with Winthrop his gifts ideas, possibly May 9, 1866, or in Oct. 1866, at Winthrop’s home, Brookline, Mass. When Winthrop expressed amazement, GP said: “Why Mr. Winthrop, this is no new idea to me. From the earliest of my manhood, I have contemplated some such disposition of my property; and I have prayed my heavenly Father, day by day, that I might be enabled, before I died, to show my gratitude for the blessings which he has bestowed upon me by doing some great good to my fellow-men.” 2-Described GP’s Nov 4, 1869, death at business friend Sir Curtis Miranda Lampson’s 80 Eaton Sq., London home; Nov. 12, 1869, Westminster Abbey funeral service; transatlantic journey of remains aboard HMS Monarch; landing at Portland, Maine, Jan. 25, 1870; funeral train to Peabody, Mass. Final burial, Harmony Grove Cemetery, Salem, Mass., Feb. 8, 1870).


New York Times, Feb. 27, 1870, p. 3 (Adm. David Glasgow Farragut was ill with pneumonia when placed in charge of U.S. naval reception of GP’s remains at Portland, Me., Jan. 25-Feb. 1, 1870, and died seven months later, Aug. 14, 1870.
He arrived in Portland Jan. 22 with his wife and secretary, was met by the Portland funeral committee, and was escorted to the Falmouth Hotel to rest, while Mrs. Farragut visited her son, Lt. Farragut, Third U.S. Artillery, at nearby Fort Preble).


New York Times, June 27, 916, p. 11, c. 4. (Obituary of Colonel William Beals, the Boston decorator who furbished Car No. 77, Eastern RR, carrying GP’s remains from Portland, Me., to Peabody, Mass., Feb. 1, 1870.
His obit. is listed in N.Y. Times Obituaries Index [1916], p. 59).


New York Times, May 13, 1926, p. 14, c. 1-2 (GP was one of 29 most famous Americans elected to the N.Y.U. Hall of Fame, 1900.
In 1901 a tablet was unveiled and on May 12, 1926 a GP bust was unveiled, made by sculptor Hans Schuler, with an address by GPCFT Pres. Bruce R. Payne; similar to BaltimoreSun, May 9, 1926, Part 2, Sect. 1, p. 10, c. 2-5, entry above).


New York Times, March 31, 1964, p. 25, c. 2-3; April 1, 1964, p. 1, c. 2, continued p. 27, c. 2-4; April 2, 1964, p. 18, c. 2; April 3, 1964, p. 23, c. 2
(Mass. Gov. Endicott “Chubb” Peabody’s mother, Mary Elizabeth [née Parkman] Peabody, wife of Episcopal Bishop Rt. Rev. Malcolm Endicott Peabody and cousin of former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, made headlines when at age 72 she was arrested overnight for protesting segregation in a St. Augustine, Fla. diner, March 31, 1964).


New York Times, Sunday, Feb. 28, 1988, John Gross, “A Banker with a Gift for Giving, A Golden Touch and a Taste for Dining Well,” Section 2, p. 39, c.1 (“Creating a Legend: George Peabody and the House of Morgan,” part of a larger Pierpont Morgan Library of N.Y. exhibit, shown from about Feb. 28 through May 8, 1988, described GP’s career, his founding of George Peabody & Co., London, that firm’s subsequent history, and other facts, and illustrated with a GP portrait and menus from GP’s London U.S.-British friendship dinners).


New York Times, Nov. 28, 1989, Steven Prokesch, “Germans to Buy Morgan Grenfell,” p. 29,
article continued as “Deutsche Bank to Acquire Morgan Grenfell,” p. 42 (George Peabody & Co., London, 1838-64, became J.S. Morgan & Co., 1864-1909, became Morgan Grenfell & Co., 1909-90, and Deutsche Morgan Grenfell since June 29, 1990, a German-owned bank).


New York Times, July 14, 1995, XIII, CN, p. 17, c. 1, Bess Liebenson. “The Country’s First Modern Philanthropist” (Described plans for celebrating the bicentennial of GP’s birth [1795-1995] in the U.S. and in London.
Showed portrait of a seated GP, commissioned to honor his Oct. 22, 1866, $150,000 gift founding the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale University).


New York Times, July 14, 1996, p. 29, Marialisa Calta, “Gimme Shelter” (Described the Greenbrier Hotel, White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., when, during the Eisenhower cold war years it had a secret deep bunker for government officials in case of nuclear attack.
The bunker, never used, was on alert during the 1962 Cuban missile crisis, a fact made public in 1992. GP on his last U.S. visit was at the Greenbrier, July 23-Aug. 30, 1869).


New York Tribune


New York Tribune, March 11, 1867, p. 2, c. 3 (GP reported to the press that about 4,000 letters begging for funds were burned in his presence).


New York Tribune, July 16, 1869, p. 2, c. 2-3 (GP spoke at July 14-16, 1869, dedication of Peabody Institute Library, Danvers, Mass.; and Oliver Wendell Holmes read his “George Peabody” poem, July 16, 1869; similar to Peabody Press, July 14, 1869, p. 2, c. 2, 4-5, entry above).


New York Tribune, Sept. 23, 1869, p. 1, c. 4 (GP’s last $400,000 PIB gift and last Baltimore departure, Sept. 22, 1869).


New York Tribune, Nov. 12, 1869, p. 1, c. 1 (Queen Victoria’s invitation, Oct. 30, 1869, for GP to visit and rest at Windsor Castle.
Too ill, he died Nov. 4, 1869).


New York Tribune, Dec. 14, 1869, p. 1, c. 1 (GP’s last will was written and witnessed in NYC, Sept. 9, 1869, and recorded in Salem, Mass., Sept. 10, 1869; similar to Salem Observer [Mass.], Jan. 15, 1870, entry above.
Described handing over ceremony of GP’s remains from Westminster Abbey, London, to Portsmouth harbor on Dec. 11, 1869, and the coffin placed aboard HMSMonarch for transatlantic crossing to New England).


New York Semi-Weekly Tribune, Dec. 28, 1869
(On the GP-Esther Elizabeth Hoppin broken engagement. Similar to Biddle, Edward, and Mantle Field, above under References: books).


New York Tribune, Jan. 20, 1870, p. 4, c. 5 (GP’s real estate property in England given at his death to his Peabody housing fund with approval of England’s Solicitor General; similar to
New York Times, Jan. 25, 1870, p. 5, c. 3-4 , entry above).


New York Semi-Weekly Tribune, Friday, Jan. 28, 1870, n.p. (Howard Glyndon’s poem, “The Coming of the Silent Guest,” republished in George Peabody House Museum, Vol. 2, Issue 3 (May 2001), p. 3).


New York World


New York World, Sept. 14, 1869, p. 12, c. 2 (Gen. J. Bankhead Magruder stated that the main photo of GP, Lee, Corcoran, Civil War generals, and others, Greenbrier Hotel, White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., was taken after GP consented to be its central figure, Aug. 12, 1869.
Photos are also in Conte, pp. 69-71; Dabney, Vol. 1, facing p. 83; Freeman-a, 1935, appendix [incorrect identification]; Freeman-b, 1947, Vol. 4, p. 438 [correct identification]; Kocher and Dearstyne, pp. 189-190; Lanier, ed., Vol. 5, p. 4; Meredith, pp. 84-85; Miller, ed., Vol. 10, p. 4; Murphy, p. 58).


New York World, Sept. 23, 1869, p. 3, c. 6 (GP’s last $400,000 PIB gift and last Baltimore departure, Sept. 22, 1869, then to Philadelphia, and NYC where some PEF trustees saw him board the Scotia, Sept. 29, 1869, for London; similar to
New York Tribune, Sept. 23, 1869, p. 1, c. 4, entry above).


New York, NYC.
Spirit of the Times


Spirit of the
Times, July 26, 1851, p. 1, c. 2; and Aug. 2, 1851, p. 279 (U.S.-British press reported favorably on GP’s first large-scale [over 800 guests] U.S.-British July 4, 1851, friendship dinner, Willis’s Rooms, London, in connection with the Great Exhibition of 1851. GP overcame British society’s reluctance to attend by getting the Duke of Wellington as guest of honor).


N .Y., Oswego.
Oswego Daily Times


Oswego Daily
Times, April 25, 1857, p. 3, c. 1 (On April 25, 1857, GP and business friend Curtis Miranda Lampson were in Oswego, N.Y., to look into the affairs of the Syracuse and Binghamton Railroad, of which GP was a large stockholder. They met with several businessmen at Luther Wright’s bank to discuss how to finance the completion of the railroad line from Syracuse to Oswego).


Asheville Citizen-Times


Asheville Citizen-Times, Nov. 28, 1992, Ulrike Huhs, “Peabody Conservatory Generates Sounds of the Future,” p. C-4 (The Peabody Conservatory of Music of Johns Hopkins Univ. had the first computer music department which, with the Johns Hopkins Univ. engineering school, initiated an electronic music degree).


Ohio , Cincinnati.
Daily Cincinnati Gazette


Daily Cincinnati Gazette, July 30, 1852, p. 2, c. 3 (GP’s June 17 and July 4, 1852, London dinners and speeches, attended by U.S. Minister Abbott Lawrence, Wm. Brown, Thomson Hankey, Thurlow Weed, and J.C. Frémont; similar to Washington, D.C., Republic, July 10, 1852, p. 2, c. 5, entry above).


Daily Cincinnati Gazette, April 1l, 1857, p. 2, c. 1 (GP’s March-April 1857 tour in the U.S. South and West; similar to Mobile (Ala.) Daily Tribune, March 5, 1857, entry above).


Ohio , Zanesville.
Zanesville Daily Courier


Zanesville Daily Courier, Aug. 7, 1869, p. 2, c. 4 (for Daily Courier reporter Mr. Reamy’s account of July 23, 1869, unveiling of GP’s seated statue in London; see also New York Times, Aug. 4, 1869, p. 5, c. 2-4, entry above).


Zanesville Daily Courier, Dec. 10, 1869, p. 3, c. 5 (Plan for transferring GP’s remains from Westminster Abbey, London, to Portsmouth harbor on Dec. 11, 1869, and the coffin placed aboard HMS Monarch
for transatlantic crossing to New England).


Zanesville Daily
Courier, Dec. 14, 1869, p. 3, c. 5 (GP’s last will was written and witnessed in NYC, Sept. 9, 1869, and recorded in Salem, Mass., Sept. 10, 1869; similar to Salem Observer [Mass.], Jan. 15, 1870, entry above).


Zanesville Daily Courier, Jan. 28, 1870, p. 2, c. 4 (GP’s real estate property in England given at his death to his Peabody housing fund approved by England’s Solicitor General; similar toNew York Times, Jan. 25, 1870, p. 5, c. 3-4 , entry above).


Zanesville Daily Signal


Zanesville Daily Signal, Nov. 24, 1869 (Quoted unknown NYC Post correspondent who interviewed GP during the Civil War and found him a staunch Unionist).


Zanesville Daily Signal, Nov. 27, 1869, p. 3, c. 2 (GP’s last will was written and witnessed in NYC, Sept. 9, 1869, and recorded in Salem, Mass., Sept. 10, 1869; similar to Salem Observer [Mass.], Jan. 15, 1870, entry above).


Zanesville Daily Signal, Dec. 11, 1869, p. 2, c. 3 (Plan for transferring GP’s remains from Westminster Abbey,

London, to Portsmouth harbor on Dec. 11, 1869, with the coffin placed aboard HMS Monarch for transatlantic crossing to New England; similar to Ohio’s Zanesville Daily Courier, Dec. 10, 1869, p. 3, c. 5, entry above).


Zanesville Daily Signal,
Dec. 15, 1869, p. 2, c. 3 (GP’s last will, Sept. 9, 1869; similar to Zanesville Daily Courier, Dec. 14, 1869, p. 3, c. 5, entry above).


Penn ., Philadelphia (Phila.)
Dollar Newspaper


Dollar Newspaper, Jan. 19, 1848, p. 3, c. 7 (Obituary of Alexander Lardner, who married Esther Elizabeth Hoppin from Providence, R.I.
GP was engaged to Esther Elizabeth Hoppin during 1838-39 in London when she attended Queen Victoria’s coronation. She broke the engagement, married her earlier beau, Alexander Lardner. They lived in Philadelphia and had two children. Artist Thomas Sully’s 1840 portrait of her is in NYC’s Frick Art Reference Library. She died in 1905. See: her obituary in Philadelphia Public Ledger, June 13, 1905, p. 7, c. 2, below).


Penn., Philadelphia Press


Philadelphia Press, Dec. 10, 1873, John W. Forney, “In Memorial: Death of Charles Macalester” (Obituary of Philadelphia financier Charles Macalester, who met GP in London, 1842, became GP’s Philadelphia agent, and was one of the 16 original PEF trustees and member of the PEF Finance Committee).


Penn., PhiladelphiaPublic Ledger


Public Ledger, Jan. 15, 1848, p. 2, c. 4 (Alexander Lardner’s obituary, husband of Esther Elizabeth Hoppin, engaged to GP, 1838-39, London; similar to Phila.’sDollar Newspaper, Jan. 19, 1848, p. 3, c. 7, entry above .
Hoppin’s obituary is in Phila’sPublic Ledger, June 13, 1905, p. 7, c. 2, below).


Public Ledger, Dec. 10, 1873, “Decease of Charles Macalester, Esq.” (Obituary of Philadelphia financier Charles Macalester, once GP’s Philadelphia agent, one of the 16 original PEF trustees, and member of the PEF Finance Committee; similar toPhiladelphia Press, Dec. 10, 1873, by John W. Forney).


Public Ledger, June 13, 1905, p. 7, c. 2 (Obituary of Esther Elizabeth Hoppin from Providence, R.I., engaged to GP during 1838-39 in London after she attended Queen Victoria’s coronation.
She broke the engagement, married her earlier beau, Alexander Lardner, who died in 1848. They lived in Philadelphia and had two children. She died in 1905. Artist Thomas Sully’s 1840 portrait of her is in NYC’s Frick Art Reference Library. See: Alexander Lardner’s obituary, Phila.’sDollar Newspaper, Jan. 19, 1848, p. 3, c. 7 and Phila.’s Public Ledger, Jan. 15, 1848, p. 2, c. 4, above).


Phila.’s North American and United States Gazette


North American and United States Gazette, Jan. 20, 1848, p. 2, c. 7 (On GP’s broken engagement to Esther Elizabeth Hoppin from Providence, R.I., 1838-39, in London; similar fuller account in
Phila.’s Public Ledger, June 13, 1905, p. 7, c. 2, entry above).


North American and United States Gazette, July 23, 1851, p. 1, c. 4 (Details of and praise for GP’s July 4, 1851, London, U.S.-British friendship dinner during the Great Exhibition of 1851, London, successful because of the Duke of Wellington’s attendance as guest of honor).


Pennsylvania Inquirer and National Gazette


Pennsylvania Inquirer and National Gazette, Jan. 20, 1848, p. 2, c. 7 (Alexander Lardner’s obituary, husband of Esther Elizabeth Hoppin, engaged to GP, 1838-39, London; similar to Phila.’sDollar Newspaper, Jan. 19, 1848, p. 3, c. 7, entry above .
Hoppin’s obituary is in Phila.’s Public Ledger, June 13, 1905, p. 7, c. 2).


Penn., Pittsburgh


Evening Chronicle, April 14, 1857, p. 1, c. 1-3 (GP’s March-April 1857 tour in the U.S. South and West; similar to Mobile (Ala.)Daily Tribune, March 5, 1857, entry above.
In Pittsburgh, Penn., GP stayed with Capt. and Mrs. Edward W.H. Schenley, April 14-16, 1857, as noted in entry immediately below).


Pittsburgh Sun-Telegraph.
Shine, Bernice, “Schenley Park Donated by Girl Whose Romance Shocked a Queen,” September 15, 1941 (GP stayed in Pittsburgh, Penn., with Capt. and Mrs. Edward W.H. Schenley during April 14-16, 1857, where a reception was held in his honor. She later donated land for Schenley Park in Pittsburgh).


Penn., Washington, Washington Weekly Reporter


Washington Weekly Reporter, Aug. 9, 1854, p. 2, c. 5 (GP gave $1,000 to the Washington National Monument, Washington, D.C., July 4, 1854, at the suggestion of Washington, D.C., business friend William Wilson Corcoran).


R.I., Newport, Newport Mercury


Newport Mercury, Aug. 15, 1857 (Elaborate farewell banquet, Aug. 10, 1857, at William Shepard Wetmore’s fashionable Newport, R.I., home, nine days before GP left NYC, Aug. 19, 1857, to return to England; similar to NYC Evening Post, Aug. 12, 1857, p. 1, and New York Daily Times, Aug. 12, 1857, p. 1, c. 6).


Newport Mercury, Nov. 13, 1869, p. 3, c. 1 (Account at GP’s death recalled his winter 1810 visit to maternal grandparents near Thetford, Vt., stopover at Stickney’s Tavern, Concord, N.H., and visit to maternal aunt, Barnstead, N.H.; similar to Boston Journal, Nov. 5, 1869, p. 4, c. 3-5, entry above).


R.I., Providence Journal


Providence Journal, Dec. 22, 1869, p. 2, c. 3 (Report of GP’s death and funeral recalled his broken engagement to Esther Elizabeth Hoppin, her marriage to Alexander Lardner, and his death in 1848.
She died in 1905. Artist Thomas Sully’s 1840 portrait of her is in NYC’s Frick Art Reference Library; similar toPennsylvania Inquirer and National Gazette, Jan. 20, 1848, p. 2, c. 7, entry above).


Tenn., Nashville, Nashville Banner


Nashville Banner, Dec. 9, 1971, p. 39 (Review of Franklin Parker,George
Peabody, A Biography [Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press, 1971], with photo of a profile of GP as a young man, taken from the dust jacket, portrait made from an original silhouette by Gary Gore, then design and promotion manager, Vanderbilt Univ. Press. His design was awarded a Gold Medal by the Art Directors’ Club, Nashville, 1971).


Nashville Banner, February 18, 1991, “VU’s Peabody Holds Top Ranking Again,” p. B-5 (PCofVU’s counseling program for preparing high school counselors rated top choice for several years).


Tenn., Nashville Tennessean


Tennessean Magazine, (May 15, 1955), Franklin Parker, “Nashville’s Yankee Friend,” pp. 2, 6-7 (From GP’s PEF came the predecessor educational institutions culminating in PCofVU).


Tennessean, Nov. 28, 1976, p. 3-F,
Tom Rogers, “Londoners’ Homes Peabody Legacy” (Three GP-related illustrations are described under GP Illustrations).


Tennessean, May 28, 1984, pp. l-A-2-A, ” ‘Mr. Peabody’ Dr. Windrow Dies at 84″ (As GPCFT student, faculty member, and administrator for 60 years, John Edwin Windrow was an indefatigable GPCFT publicist.
His GPCFT dissertation and book were on the life of Univ. of Nashville Chancellor John Berrien Lindsley).


Tennessean, Dec. 26, 1991, “New Peabody Dean Eager to Help State Change Face of Education,” p. B-3 (PCofVU under second Dean James Pellegrino).


Tennessean, May 7, 1995, p. 2D, Louis J. Salome, “George Peabody, More Than Just a College Name.” (Photo of bust of GP by sculptor Hans Schuler, unveiled May 12, 1926, New York University Hall of Fame Colonnade).


Tennessean, Sept. 2, 1996, p. 6A, “The First Nashville, 1780′s” (Described the origins and early history of Nashville, Tenn.).


Tennessean, June 24, 1997, p. 7B (Obituary of Felix Compton Robb, assistant to GPCFT Pres. Henry Harrington Hill from 1947, dean of instruction, and successor president of GPCFT during 1961-66.
He was director, Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, 1966-82, was a trustee of several colleges, a consultant to various boards and foundations, and interim president, Tallulah Falls School, Ga.).


Tennessean, Sept. 25, 1999, p. lB, “Architect Helped Build City’s Colleges” (Architect Henry Clossen Hibbs, hired by first Pres. Bruce R. Payne to design GPCFT, Nashville [completed 1914] after Thomas Jefferson’s Univ. of Va. architectural plan).


Tennessean, March 31, 2000, pp. B1, continued 6B, “VU Keeps its Hold on U.S. Rankings” (U.S.
News & World Report ranked PCofVU as sixth best graduate education school for the second consecutive year).


Tennessean, April 30, 2000, p. 1B (The PCofVU’s Social-Religious Building was renamed, April 20, 2000, the Faye and Joe Wyatt Center for Education, after the retiring VU chancellor and his wife, under whom that historic building was renovated, 1993-96).


Tennessean, Aug. 7, 2000, p. 5B, “Noted philanthropist Philip Belz dies” (Realtor company chairman emeritus Philip Belz [1904-2000], whose Belz Enterprises owned the Peabody Hotel Group, died Aug 4, 2000, in Memphis).


Tennessean, Aug. 22 and 23, 2000, both pp. 1A-2A. (Started in 1965, the John F. Kennedy Center for Research on Education and Human Development, PCofVU, Nashville, Tenn., with Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Foundation startup funds, is one of 14 federally funded mental retardation research centers.
Its $11 million budget in 2000 enabled advanced work by some 90 Vanderbilt Univ. and PCofVU researchers).


Tennessean, Sept. 14, 2000. P. 2E, “House of Morgan Has Storied Past” (The J.P. Morgan, Sr., bank, NYC, was bought for about $39.2 billion in stock by the Chase Manhattan Corp., thus surviving GP by 131 years, 1869-2000; J.S. Morgan by 110 years, 1890-2000; J.P. Morgan, Sr., himself by 87 years, 1913-2000; and J.P. Morgan, Sr.’s son by 66 years, 1934-2000).


Tennessean, Sept. 21, 2000, p. 4B, “Little Rock’s Peabody Hotel to Include Ducks” (Lease signed in Little Rock, Ark., converting the former Excelsior Hotel into the Peabody Hotel, which will continue the daily duck waddle tradition down the red carpet into the hotel lobby pool).


Tennessean, April 1, 2001, p. 3B, “VU’s Peabody Cracks Top 5 Grad Schools of Education” (After ranking among top 10 graduate schools of education in U.S. News & World Report’s annual ranking since 1995, PCofVU jumped to 5th place in 2001).


Tennessean, March 31, 2004, “Dr. Susan Gray’s Legacy” (GPCFT Early Childhood Education Prof. Susan Gray’s [1913-92] enrichment program for poverty-deprived Nashville area 4 and 5 year olds in 1965 inspired the U.S. national Project Headstart).


Tennessean, Jan. 6, 2005, pp. 1Ai-2A (Controversy, 2002-2005, over Vanderbilt Univ.’s intent to remove “Confederate” from PCofVU Confederate Memorial Hall dormitory building).


Tennessean, Jan. 9, 2005, pp. 18A-19A (Similar to immediately above).


Tennessean, Jan. 10, 2005, p. 6A (Similar to immediately above).


Tennessean, Jan. 21, 2005, p. 5A (Similar to immediately above).


Tennessean, May 17, 2005, p. 11A (Similar to immediately above).


Texas, Austin American


Austin American, March 18, 1964, Tom A. Cullen, “Peabody Pioneer: First Slum Push” (Engraving of “Peabody’s Apartment Houses,” London).


Va., Richmond Daily Whig


Richmond Daily Whig, July 28, 1869, p. 2, c. 5 (GP at White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., July 23-Aug. 30, 1869; where resolution of praise were read to him, July 28, 1869; where he spoke to and was photographed with Robert E. Lee and other northern and southern educational, political leaders, military leaders [Aug. 12]; and where a Peabody Ball was held in his honor [Aug. 11]; similar to New York Times, July 31, 1869, p. 4, c. 7; and p. 5, c. 1, entries above).


Richmond Daily Whig, Aug. 13, 1869, p. 2, c. 3-4 (Continuation of Richmond Daily Whig, July 28, 1869, p. 2, c. 5, above, on GP’s July 23-Aug. 30, 1869, visit to the Greenbrier Hotel, White Sulphur Springs health spa, W.Va., where a Peabody Ball was held in his honor on Aug. 11, 1869).


Richmond Daily Whig, Aug. 17, 1869, p. 2, c. 5 (GP gave his lost Va. bonds, 1869, to R.E. Lee’s Washington College, later redeemed at $60,000; similar to Baltimore American, May 14, 1883, entry above).


Richmond Daily Whig, Aug. 20, 1869, p. 3, c. 2 (Stated that photos of GP, R.E. Lee, others, White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., were taken by Anderson and Johnson of Anderson’s Richmond photographic establishment on Aug. 12, 1869; similar to
New York World, Sept. 14, 1869, p. 12, c. 2, entry above).


Va., Richmond Dispatch


Richmond Dispatch, March 3, 1857, p. 1, c. 5 (Freighter named George Peabody carried goods between Baltimore and Richmond, Va., from 1857; similar to Baltimore American, Feb. 19, 1857, p. 1, c. 4, entry above).


Richmond Dispatch, March 13, 1857, p. 1, c. 4 (GP’s March-April 1857 tour in the U.S. South and West; similar to Mobile (Ala.),Daily Tribune, March 5, 1857, entry above).


Richmond Dispatch, Feb. 2, 1896, p. 12, c. 1-2, “To Honor Peabody” (On Feb. 1, 1896, Va. state Sen. William Lovenstein introduced a resolution and supporting letter of Jan. 24, 1896, from PEF administrator J.L.M. Curry for a GP statue to be placed in Statuary Hall, U.S. House of Representatives, U.S. Capitol Bldg., Washington, D.C., where each state has statues of two notable citizens.
But this effort was not successful).


W. Va., White Sulphur Springs, White Sulphur Echo


White Sulphur Echo, Vol. 22, No. 51 (Aug. 12, 1869), 3 pp. (GP joined longtime business friend William Wilson Corcoran at White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., July 23-Aug. 30, 1869.
Gathered there by chance were southern and northern social, political, educational, and military elites. Relevant articles, p. 1, “Great Peabody Ball [Aug. 11, 1869]“; p. 2, “Statue of Mr. Peabody [London, unveiled July 23, 1869]“; p. 3, “An Endowment of Washington College [Lexington, Va., R.E. Lee, president] by George Peabody. Mr. Peabody’s Health”; “An Historic Group [photographer Anderson's historic photo of "General Lee, Mr. Peabody, Generals Wise, Beauregard, Gary Connor, Lilly, Lawton and Magruder, and Messrs. Brent, W.W. Corcoran, James Lyons, and Blacque Bey"].”


W. Va., White Sulphur Springs, Lee Week Herald


Lee Week Herald, Vol. 1, No. 4 (Aug. 25, 1932), one page.
(Apparently a commemorative issue. Relevant articles: “How They Honored General Lee” [his arrival in early Aug. 1869; funds raised locally to repair his church in Lexington, Va., to which GP contributed; and the Peabody Ball, Aug. 11, 1869]; and “The ’69 Season” ["the season of '69 was the nonpareil…nothing to equal"; this gathering centered on R.E. Lee and GP].


W. Va., White Sulphur Echo and Lee Week Herald


White Sulphur Echo and Lee Week Herald, Aug. 31, 1934) (Commemorative issue of Lee and GP at White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., Aug. 1869; similar to above).


f. British Newspapers (alphabetically by country and city)


England, Birmingham Weekly Post


Birmingham Weekly Post, Dec. 18, 1869, p. 3, c. 6 (GP’s death on Nov. 4, 1869, in London; his Westminster Abbey funeral service on Nov. 12, 1869; funeral carriages and occupants from the Abbey to Waterloo train station; funeral train from London to Portsmouth harbor on Dec. 11, 1869; handing over ceremonies and speeches by U.S. Minister to Britain Motley to HMSMonarch‘s Capt. Commerell; and placing GP’s coffin aboard HMSMonarch for transatlantic crossing to New England).


England, Boston Guardian


Boston Guardian, Nov. 27, 1869, p. 2, c. 5 (Plans for the handing over ceremony of GP’s remains from Westminster Abbey, London, to Portsmouth harbor on Dec. 11, 1869, and the placing of the coffin aboard HMS Monarch for transatlantic crossing to New England).


England, Brechin AdvertiserAdvertiser


Brechin Advertiser, Nov. 30, 1869, p. 3, c. 3
(Similar to Boston Guardian, Nov. 27, 1869, p. 2, c. 5, immediately above).


England, Brighton Daily News


Brighton Daily News, Nov. 15, 1869, p. 5, c. 4 (Bishop of London’s sermon on GP’s life and influence, Westminster Abbey, Sunday, Nov. 14, 1869.
Similar to New York Times, Nov. 27, 1869, p. 1, c. 6-7).


Brighton Daily News, Dec. 13, 1869, p. 3, c. 1-2 (Sat., Dec. 11, 1869, 7:00 A.M., a cold, damp, dark morning, with Westminster Abbey’s dean A.P. Stanley present, GP’s coffin was taken from the Abbey to a waiting hearse, followed by other carriages, going to Waterloo Station, where a special train waited to take GP’s remains to Portsmouth).


England, Brighton Gazette


Brighton Gazette, Aug. 23, 1866,
“Photographic Art, “p. 5.(Reported John Mayall’s life-size portrait of GP, overpainted by artist Aed Arnoult to resemble an oil painting, displayed in Mayall’s Brighton studio, intended for the PIB, “a great success” and reported that it was “to be exhibited free to the working classes, on Saturday next, at the Town Hall”).


England, Brighton Herald


Brighton Herald, Nov. 21, 1868, p. 3, c. 5 (GP and U.S Minister to Britain Reverdy Johnson were in Brighton, England, Nov. 1868.
Reverdy Johnson spoke at a Nov. 21 public dinner in Brighton).


Brighton Herald, Nov. 28, 1868, p. 4, c. 2-3 (Similar to Brighton Herald, Nov. 21, 1868, p. 3, c. 5, immediately above.
GP and Reverdy Johnson attended Christ Church, Brighton, Nov. 22, and were the subject of Rev. Robert Ainslie’s sermon).


England, Brighton Guardian


Brighton Guardian, Nov. 18, 1868, p. 5, c. 6; and
Nov. 25, 1868, p. 7 (Similar to Brighton Herald, Nov. 28, 1868, p. 4, c. 2-3, immediately above).


England, Brighton Observer


Brighton Observer, Nov. 12, 1869, p. 2, c. 2 (Publicity after GP’s death on Nov. 4, 1869:
GP was given the Freedom of the City of London, July 10, 1862, and that evening was guest of honor at the Lord Mayor of London’s Mansion House banquet, in appreciation for his March 12, 1862, Peabody Donation Fund for model homes for London working poor, total gift $2.5 million.Some accounts reported that he walked home to his lodging from that banquet).


England, Liverpool.
Daily Post


Daily Post, Jan. 8, 1862, p. 5, c. 1-2 (Allen S. Hanckel incident and the Trent Affair).


England, London. Anglo-American Time


Anglo-American Times, Dec. 23, 1865, p. 8, c. 1-2 (During the Civil War GP gave a total of $10,000 to the U.S. Sanitary Commission for sick and wounded Union soldiers and their dependents).


Anglo-American Times, June 26, 1869, p. 11, c. 3; and p. 16, c. 1-2 (GP arrived in NYC for his June 8 to Sept. 29, 1869, last U.S. visit).


Anglo-American Times, Aug. 14, 1869, p. 15, c. 1 (GP at White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., July 23-Aug. 30, 1869; where resolution of praise were read to him, July 28, 1869; where he spoke to and was photographed with Robert E. Lee and other northern and southern educational, political leaders, military leaders [Aug. 12]; and where a Peabody Ball was held in his honor [Aug. 11]; similar to New York Times, July 31, 1869, p. 4, c. 7; and p. 5, c. 1, entries above).


Anglo-American Times, Oct. 2, 1869, p. 9, c. 1 (Described coffin-shaped granite sarcophagus GP ordered for his grave at Harmony Grove Cemetery, Salem, Mass., mid-Sept. 1869.
Recorded also that in 1854 GP asked visiting Americans James Watson Webb and Reverdy Johnson to consult with John Pendleton Kennedy and other Baltimoreans about a possible GP educational gift to that city, leading to the PIB).


Anglo-American
Times, Oct. 9, 1869, p. 11, c. 2 (GP’s last $400,000 PIB gift, last departure from Baltimore, Sept. 22, 1869, then to Philadelphia, and NYC where some PEF trustees saw him board the Scotia, Sept. 29, 1869, for London where he died Nov. 4, 1869; similar to New York Tribune, Sept. 23, 1869, p. 1, c. 4, entry above).


Anglo-American
Times, Oct. 23, 1869, p. 11, c. 3; and Oct. 30, 1869, p. 10, c. 3 (Report of GP’s arrival in London Oct. 8, 1869, from his last U.S. visit and his intent “to pass the winter in the south of France.” But gravely ill, he rested until his death, Nov. 4, 1869, at the home of business friend Sir Curtis Miranda Lampson, 80 Eaton Sq., London).


Anglo-American Times, Dec. 11, 1869, p. 11, c. 1-2 (GP’s death, Nov. 4, 1869, London; Westminster Abbey funeral service, Nov. 12, 1869; funeral carriages and occupants from the Abbey to Waterloo train station; funeral train from London to Portsmouth harbor, Dec. 11, 1869; Portsmouth handing over ceremonies and speeches; and placing GP’s coffin aboard HMSMonarch for transatlantic crossing to New England; similar toBirmingham [England] Weekly Post, Dec. 18, 1869, p. 3, c. 6, entry above).


Anglo-American Times, Jan. 8, 1870, p. 8, c. 2 (U.S. House Resolution No. 96 for U.S. naval reception of GP’s remains from England at U.S. landing port [Portland, Me.], introduced in the House, Dec. 15, 1869, debated and passed, Dec. 21, 1869, passed in Senate, Dec. 23, 1869, and signed into law by Pres. Grant, Jan. 10, 1870; similar to New
York Times, Dec. 22, 1869, p. 1, c. 4, entry above).


Anglo-American Times, Jan. 8, 1870, p. 10, c. 2 (Details of transatlantic voyage of HMS Monarch and USS Plymouth from Spithead near Portsmouth, England;
to Madeira, Portugal; to Bermuda; and to New England receiving port).


England, London. Army and Navy Gazette


Army and Navy Gazette, Dec. 18, 1869, p. 802, c. 2 (“Private telegrams have been received in London from New York, stating that the honour done to the remains of the late Mr. Peabody, and to the fact that our Government having conveyed his body to America in a ship of war, has had a great effect on the States, and has gone far towards doing away with the ill-feeling caused by the Alabama difficulties.
There is a story going about to the effect that the special correspondent in London of a well known American paper lately telegraphed to ask his employers what line he should take upon the Alabama question. The reply, through the cable, was, ‘Let the matter drop; it’s played out‘”).


Army and Navy Gazette, Dec. 18, 1869, p. 811, c. 1 (Transfer by train of GP’s remains from Westminster Abbey, London, to Portsmouth harbor, Dec. 11, 1869, and the handing over ceremony of the coffin to HMS Monarch for transatlantic crossing to New England).


England, London. British Army Dispatch


British Army Dispatch, July 9, 1852, p. 445, c. 1-3
(GP’s June 17 and July 4, 1852, London dinners and speeches, attended by U.S. Minister Abbott Lawrence, Wm. Brown, Thomson Hankey, Thurlow Weed, and J.C. Frémont; similar to Washington, D.C.,Republic, July 10, 1852, p. 2, c. 5, entry above).


England, London. Catholic Opinion


Catholic Opinion, Nov. 20, 1869, p. 462, c. 1 (The erroneous report of a GP statue planned in Rome after GP’s death, Nov. 4, 1869, London, may have been connected with R.C. Winthrop and GP’s Feb. 24 or 25, 1868, interview with Pope Pius IX and GP’s gift through Cardinal Antonelli to the Vatican charitable San Spirito Hospital of $19,300).


England, London. City Press


City Press, May 14, 1867 (Two subscription lists showed £2,342.19s. received as of April 1866 to erect a statue of GP in London to honor his Peabody Homes for London’s working poor).


City Press, May 18, 1867 (Third subscription list showed £2,572.13s.2d. received in April 1866 to erect a GP statue in London to honor his Peabody Homes for London’s working poor).


City Press, May 31, 1867 (Fourth subscription list showed amount received in May 1866 to erect a GP statue in London to honor his Peabody Homes for London’s working poor).


England, London. Court Journal


Court Journal, Feb. 22, 1862, p. 183, c. 3 (Quoted Thurlow Weed’s Jan. 12, 1862, letter to the Albany Evening Journalstating that GP planned a large gift of model homes for London’s working poor).


Court Journal, April 7, 1866, p. 381, c. 2 (GP’s second Peabody Donation Fund, April 19, 1866, gift, $500,000; total $2.5 million).


England, London. Daily News


Daily News, July 7, 1854 (U.S. Legation in London Secty. D.E. Sickles walked out in anger from GP’s July 4, 1854, U.S.-British friendship dinner because GP toasted the Queen before the U.S. president; the incident attracted pro and con letters in the press for months; similar to Boston Post, July 21, 1854, p. 2, c. l, entry above).


Daily News, Nov. 8, 1869, p. 5, c. 3 (“We have received a large number of letters, urging that the honours of a public funeral are due to the late Mr. Peabody’s memory”).


Daily News, Dec. 13, 1869 (Handing over ceremony of GP’s remains from Westminster Abbey, London, to Portsmouth harbor on Dec. 11, 1869, and the placing of the coffin aboard HMS Monarch
for transatlantic crossing to New England; similar to plan mentioned in Ohio’s Zanesville Daily Courier, Dec. 10, 1869, p. 3, c. 5, entry above).


England, London. Daily Telegraph


Daily Telegraph, April 29 and 30, 1867 (Two subscription lists of £2,342.19s. received as of April 1866 to erect a GP statue in London to honor his Peabody Homes for London’s working poor; similar to City Press, May 14, 1867, entry above).


Daily Telegraph, May 16, 1867 (Third subscription list of £2,572.13s.2d. received in April 1866 to erect a GP statue in London to honor his Peabody Homes for London’s working poor; similar to City Press, May 18, 1867, entry above).


Daily Telegraph, May 30, 1867 (Fourth subscription list of amount received in May 1866 to erect a GP statue in London to honor his Peabody Homes for London’s working poor; similar toCity Press, May 31, 1867, entry above).


Daily Telegraph, Oct. 9, 1867 (Approval of Salem, Mass.-born sculptor W.W. Story to prepare statue of
GP in London [unveiled July 23, 1869]).


England, London. European Mail


European Mail, Jan. 23, 1870 (England’s Solicitor General ruled that GP’s real estate property in England should go to the Peabody housing fund, as GP wished; similar to New York Times, Jan. 25, 1870, p. 5, c. 3-4, entry above).


England, London. Fun


Fun, Feb. 24, 1866, p. 235 (GP’s second gift to the Peabody Donation Fund, April 19, 1866, $500,000; total $2.5 million).


England, London. Illustrated London News


Illustrated London News, April 5, 1862, p. 335 (GP’s March 12, 1862, letter founding the Peabody Donation Fund for homes for London’s working poor, total gift $2.5 million, 1862-69).


Illustrated London News, Vol. 48, No. 1368 (April 28, 1866), pp. 409, 410 (GP at the prize-giving ceremony of the Workingmen’s Industrial Exhibition.
He was the first U.S. citizen and the 41st person to be made an honorary member of the Fishmongers’ Co. of London, April 19, 1866, before leaving on his May 1, 1866, to May 1, 1867, U.S. visit).


Illustrated London News, May 26, 1867, p. 513 (Illustration of Queen Victoria’s enameled miniature portrait done in 1867 by British artist F.A.C. Tilt, set in a frame of solid gold, given to GP in 1867 for his $2.5 million gift for Peabody model homes for London’s working poor, since 1862; original in Peabody Institute Library, Peabody, Mass.).


Illustrated London News, Nov. 20, 1869, p. 26 (Engraving of GP’s funeral service in London’s Westminster Abbey, Nov. 12, 1869).


Illustrated London News, Vol. 55, No. 1573 (Dec. 25, 1869), pp. 648, 661 (Handing over ceremony of GP’s remains from Westminster Abbey, London, to Portsmouth harbor on Dec. 11, 1869, with the coffin placed aboard HMS Monarch for transatlantic crossing to New England; similar to plans mentioned in Ohio’s Zanesville Daily Courier, Dec. 10, 1869, p. 3, c. 5, entry above).


London.Ladies Newspaper (and Ladies Newspaper and Pictorial
Times)


Ladies Newspaper and Pictorial Times, July 26, 1851, p. 43 (U.S.-British press reported favorably on GP’s first large-scale [over 800 guests] U.S.-British July 4, 1851, friendship dinner at Willis’s Rooms, London, in connection with the Great Exhibition, 1851.
GP overcame British society’s reluctance to attend by getting the Duke of Wellington as guest of honor).


Ladies Newspaper, July 1, 1869, p. 64, c. 1 (U.S. sculptor W.W. Story’s model of GP’s seated London statue sent to Munich, Germany, for bronze casting.
GP’s statue later unveiled, July 23, 1869, by the Prince of Wales, later King Edward VII, who eulogized GP and praised W.W. Story and U.S. Minister John Lothrop Motley, both of whom also spoke).


London.
Leader


Leader, June 26, 1852, pp. 603, 708
(GP’s June 17 and July 4, 1852, London dinners and speeches, attended by U.S. Minister Abbott Lawrence, Wm. Brown, Thomson Hankey, Thurlow Weed, and J.C. Frémont; similar to Washington, D.C., Republic, July 10, 1852, p. 2, c. 5, entry above).


London.
Lloyd’s Weekly Newspaper


Lloyd’s Weekly Newspaper, June 22, 1856, p. 5, c. 3 (GP’s June 13, 1856, U.S.-British friendship dinner, London, to introduce new U.S. Minister to Britain George M. Dallas, with C.M. Lampson, Joseph Paxton, J.P. Kennedy, and J.S. Morgan present; held during U.S.-British irritation over the Crimea War; similar to New York Daily Times, July 4, 1856, p. 2, c. 4-5, entry above).


London.
Morning Advertiser


Morning Advertiser, July 7, 1854, p. 6, c. 3-4
(U.S. London Legation Secty. D.E. Sickles walked out in anger from GP’s July 4, 1854, U.S.-British friendship dinner because GP toasted the Queen before the U.S. president; incident inflamed with pro and con letters in the press for months; similar to New York Times, Sept. 6, 1854, p. 3, c. 3-5, and ff. entries above).


Morning Advertiser, July 7, 1856, p. 4, c. 1-3 (GP’s July 4, 1856, London dinner.
U.S. Minister to Britain George M. Dallas and GP spoke. Samuel F.B. Morse replied to a toast to “The Telegraph.” Similar to New York Times, July 24, 1856, p. 2, c. 2-3, entry above).


London.
Morning Herald


Morning Herald, Nov. 5, 1869, p. 4. c. 5-6; and Nov. 8, 1869, p. 3, c. 4 (To correct an earlier error saying` that GP first went to London in 1837, M.J. Powell wrote that he had seen GP in Manchester in 1832 [GP's
third buying trip to Europe, May 1, 1832-May 11, 1834]. GP’s first buying trip abroad was Nov. 1, 1827 to Aug. 1828, nine months; second trip, 1831 to 1832 [15 months], covering 10,000 miles in England, France, Italy, and Switzerland; fourth trip, about Aug. 1835 to July 1836; fifth trip, early Feb. 1837 to sell Md.’s $8 million bonds abroad, remaining in London, 1837-69, 32 years, except for three U.S. visits).


Morning Herald, Dec. 9, 1869, p. 6, c. 2 (Erroneous reports of statues of GP to be erected in Rome, Italy, and NYC.
NYC meetings on Nov. 20 and 23, 1869, failed to gain support for a GP statue; the reason later given was that mounting honors for GP offended belief in republican simplicity).


London.
Morning Post


Morning Post, Oct. 26, 1855 (GP’s $10,000 gift for scientific equipment for 1853-55 Second U.S. Grinnell Expedition’s search for lost British Arctic explorer Sir John Franklin; similar to Washington, D.C., Daily National Intelligencer, Feb. 1, 1853, p. 3, c. 4, entry above).


Morning Post, Dec. 13, 1869 (Handing over ceremony of GP’s remains from Westminster Abbey, London, to Portsmouth harbor on Dec. 11, 1869, with the coffin placed aboard HMSMonarch
for transatlantic crossing to New England; similar toNew York Times, Dec. 14, 1869, p. 5, c. 1, entry above).


London.
News of the World


News of the World, Nov. 20, 1869, p. 6, c. 2-4 (Bishop of London’s sermon on GP’s life and influence, Westminster Abbey, Sunday, Nov. 14, 1869.
Similar to New York Times, Nov. 27, 1869, p. 1, c. 6-7).


London.
Punch


Punch, July 27, 1867, p. 33 (Cartoon and long poem praising GP and Angela Georgina Burdett-Coutts as the most prominent philanthropists of the time).


London.
Spectator


Spectator, July 31, 1869, p. 891, c. 1-2 (Sculptor W.W. Story’s remarks at July 23, 1869, unveiling of his GP seated statue in London; see also New York Times, Aug. 4, 1869, p. 5, c. 2-4, entry above).


London.
Sportsman


Sportsman, Dec. 25, 1869, p. 4, c. 1 (As HMS Monarch, accompanied by USS Plymouth, left Spithead near Portsmouth harbor, England, Dec. 21, 1869, to deliver GP’s remains for burial in Mass., some urged naming a newly opened London street leading from the Mansion House to Blackfriar’s Bridge Peabody Street.
The Sportsman’s editor was mildly critical that the Metropolitan Board of Works chose instead to call it Queen Victoria Street).


London.
Standard


Standard, May 25, 1866 (Appeal for funds to erect a GP statue in London to honor his Peabody Homes for London’s working poor).


Standard, May 20, 1867 (Fourth subscription list showed £2,572.13s.2d. received in May 1866 to erect a statue of GP in London to honor his Peabody Homes for London’s working poor).


London.
Sun


Sun, July 11, 1851, p. 1, c. 5-6 (U.S.-British press reported favorably on GP’s first large-scale [over 800 guests] U.S.-British July 4, 1851, friendship dinner at Willis’s Rooms, London, in connection with the Great Exhibition, 1851, London.
GP overcame British society’s reluctance to attend by getting the Duke of Wellington as guest of honor).


Sun, Oct. 30, 1869, p. 2, c. 6 (Queen Victoria’s invitation, Oct. 30, 1869, for GP to visit and rest at Windsor Castle.
Too ill, he died Nov. 4, 1869; similar to New York Tribune, Nov. 12, 1869, p. 1, c. 1, entry above).


Sun, Nov. 1, 1869, p. 3, c. 5 (Report of GP’s declining health at business friend Sir Curtis Miranda Lampson’s 80 Eaton Sq., London home; similar to London’s Anglo-American Times, Oct. 23, 1869, p. 11, c. 3; and Oct. 30, 1869, p. 10, c. 3. entries above).


Sun, Dec. 13, 1869, p. 2, c. 2 (GP’s death, Nov. 4, 1869, London; Westminster Abbey funeral service, Nov. 12, 1869; funeral carriages and occupants from the Abbey to Waterloo train station; funeral train from London to Portsmouth harbor, Dec. 11, 1869; Portsmouth handing over ceremonies and speeches; and placing GP’s coffin aboard HMS Monarch for transatlantic crossing to New England; similar to Birmingham
[England]Weekly Post, Dec. 18, 1869, p. 3, c. 6, entry above).


London.
Times


Times, Jan. 29, 1851, p. 4, c. 4; and Feb. 24, 1851, p. 8, c. 6 (U.S. exhibitors at the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London lacked Congressional funds to display U.S. industry and art products.
GP’s timely $15,000 loan saved the U.S. and its London embassy staff from embarrassment. This loan, which Congress repaid three years later, and GP’s two exhibition-connected U.S.-British friendship dinner brought him to prominence).


Times, May 22, 1851, p. 8, c. 1 (Mentioned London Punch’s satirical remarks on U.S. exhibitors’ large promise and little performance before the opening of the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London, before GP’s $15,000 loan to the exhibitors, and before his exhibition-connected rising reputation).


Times, July 9, 1851, p. 5, c. 3 (Details of and praise for GP’s first large-scale [over 800 guests] U.S.-British July 4, 1851, friendship dinner, Willis’s Rooms, London, in connection with the Great Exhibition, 1851, London.
GP overcame British society’s reluctance to attend by getting the Duke of Wellington as guest of honor. The Times reported that His Grace had a good time and left at a late hour and referred to GP as “an eminent American merchant”).


Times, Oct. 26, 1855, p. 7, c. 5; and Oct. 27, 1855, p. 7, c. 2 (GP’s $10,000 science equipment gift for 1853-55 Second U.S. Grinnell Expedition’s search for lost British Arctic explorer Sir John Franklin; similar to Washington, D.C., Daily National Intelligencer, Feb. 1, 1853, p. 3, c. 4, entry above).


Times, July 7, 1856, p. 10, c. 5-6 (Described GP-sponsored July 4, 1856, dinner at the Star and Garter Hotel, Richmond, near London, attended by Irish sculptor J.E. Jones, who made a bust of GP in 1856).


Times, July 29, 1858, p. 12, c. 3 (GP’s July 22, 1858, dinner, London, with guests: U.S. Minister to France John Young Mason, John Pendleton Kennedy, and N.Y.


Times founder and first editor Henry Jarvis Raymond; similar toNew York Times, Aug. 8, 1858, p. 2, c.1-2, entry above).


Times, Feb. 17, 1862, p. 9, c. 2 (Quoted Thurlow Weed’s Jan. 12, 1862, letter to the Albany Evening Journal stating that GP planned a large gift of model homes for London’s working poor).


Times, March 26, 1862, p. 9, c. 6 (GP’s March 12, 1862, letter founding the Peabody Donation Fund for building apartments for London’s working poor [total gift $2.5 million, 1862-69]).


Times, March 29, 1862, p. 11, c. 5
(Letters to the editor asked that public honor be given to GP for his March 12, 1862, letter establishing the Peabody Donation Fund for model homes for London working poor, total gift $2.5 million. London’s Court of Common Council member Charles Reed planned to introduce a resolution that GP be granted the Freedom of the City of London).


Times, April 8, 1862, p. 11, c. 3 (Member of London’s Court of Common Council Charles Reed made public his intention to introduce a resolution that the Freedom of the City of London be offered to GP
for his March 12, 1862, gift of housing for London’s working poor, an honor GP received July 10, 1862).


Times, May 23, 1862, p. 6, c. 1 (On May 22, 1862, in London’s Court of Common Council, Guildhall, the Lord Mayor presiding, member Charles Reed spoke on behalf of his resolution that the Freedom of the City of London be offered to GP for his March 12, 1862, gift of housing for London’s working poor.
An amendment to substitute a bust of GP in the Council Chamber was defeated and the original motion was carried).


Times, July 4, 1862, p. 5, c. 5 (On July 2, 1862, GP was made an honorary member of the Clothworkers’ Co., an ancient guild, for his March 12, 1862, Peabody Donation Fund for apartments for London working poor [total gift $2.5 million]).


Times, July 11, 1862, p. 5, c. 3-5 (GP received the Freedom of the City of London, July 10, 1862, was banqueted at the Lord Mayor’s Mansion House that evening, and reportedly walked home to his lodging; similar to England’s Brighton Observer, Nov. 12, 1869, p. 2, c. 2, entry above).


Times, Aug. 23, 1862, p. 9, c. 5 (Many begging letters were sent to GP after Peabody Donation Fund founding, March 12, 1862).


Times, Feb. 12, 1866, p. 10, c. 5 (GP’s planned second gift to the Peabody Donation Fund, April 19, 1866, gift, $500,000 [total $2.5 million]).


Times, April 2, 1866, p. 9, c. 6 (Queen Victoria’s March 28, 1866, letter of thanks to GP for his March 12, 1862, gift to build apartments for London’s working poor.
She also informed him that she was having a miniature portrait of herself painted for him. Also, GP’s April 3, 1866, reply; similar to New York Times, April 27, 1866, p. 1, c. 6, entry above).


Times, April 18, 1866 (GP at the prize-giving ceremony of the Workingmen’s Industrial Exhibition).


Times, April 23, 1866, p. 9, c. 6 (GP was the first U.S. citizen and the 41st person to be made an honorary member of the Fishmongers’ Co. of London, April 19, 1866; similar toIllustrated London News, Vol. 48, No. 1368, April 28, 1866, entry above).


Times, May 22, 1866, p. 12, c. 5; and May 25, 1866, p. 9, c. 6 (London Court of Common Council members met, March 7, 1866, proposed a tribute to GP for his Peabody Donation Fund.
A letter signed by 50 prominent Londoners called for an April 12, 1866, organizational meeting, at which a committee was formed to raise funds for a GP statue).


Times, May 24, 1866, p. 9, c. 5; June 16, 1866, p. 12, c. 5; and March 18, 1867, p. 5, c. 5 (Description of Queen Victoria’s gift to GP of her portrait by British artist F.A.C. Tilt, a photo of which in miniature was enameled on porcelain and set in a gold frame; seen by GP March 1867, deposited in a specially built vault, Peabody Institute Library, Peabody, Mass., since April 28, 1868).


Times, May 26, 1866, p. 9, c. 5 (Quoted a suggestion in the Pall Mall Gazette that a better tribute to GP than to erect a statue of him would be to follow his example in the Peabody Donation Fund by giving funds for a good cause).


Times, May 31, 1866, p. 9, c. 6 (Report that GP paid a huge U.S. tax soon after his NYC arrival for his May 1, 1866 to May 1, 1867, U.S. visit).


Times, July 17, 1866, p. 10, c. 1; and Aug. 2, 1866, p. 9,
c. 2 (GP visited Montreal, Canada, July 7-9, 1866, and fished for salmon on a Marguerite River stream to mid-July 1866).


Times, Feb. 28, 1867, p. 5, c. 3 (U.S. Pres. Andrew Johnson visited GP, Feb. 9, 1867, at Willard’s Hotel, Washington, D.C., to thank him for the PEF as a national gift; similar to New York Herald, Feb. 10, 1867, p. 8, c. 1, entry above).


Times, March 30, 1867, p. 5, c. 5 (GP told the press that about 4,000 letters begging for funds were burned in his presence).


Times, April 8, 1867, p. 12, c. 2 (First meeting of PEF trustees, Willard’s Hotel, Washington, D.C., Feb. 8, 1867; similar to New York Times, Feb. 9, 1867, p. 1, c. 7).


Times, April 20, 1867; and April 23,1867 (Two subscription lists showed £2,342.19s. received as of April 1866 to erect a GP statue in London to honor his Peabody Homes for London’s working poor).


Times, May 16, 1867 (Third subscription list showed £2,572.13s.2d. received in April 1866 to erect a GP statue in London to honor his Peabody Homes for London’s working poor).


Times, May 22, 1867, p. 9, c. 6 (Described GP aboard the Scotia returning to England and resolutions of praise for him from U.S. passengers, May 8, 1867).


Times, May 29, 1867 (Fourth subscription list published listing money received in May 1866 to erect a GP statue in London to honor his Peabody Homes for London’s working poor).


Times, Aug. 25, 1868, p. 8, c. 4; and Feb. 12, 1869, p. 4, c. 6 (On Congressional gold medal to GP for the PEF, similar to New York Herald, May 29, 1868, p. 3, c. 6, entry above).


Times, Feb. 12, 1869, p. 4, c. 6 (On Congressional resolution of praise and gold medal to GP for the PEF, similar to New York Herald, May 29, 1868, p. 3, c. 6, entry above.
GP asked U.S. Secty. of State W.H. Seward, Sept. 18, 1868, for these to be sent to him in London. He saw them in London, Dec. 25, 1868, and sent them for safekeeping to Peabody Institute Library, Peabody, Mass.).


Times, March 12, 1869 (Obituary of Sir James Emerson Tennent, April 7, 1791-March 6, 1869, MP from Belfast, Peabody Homes of London trustee, and GP’s longtime friend).


Times, July 14, 1869, p. 6, c. 2 (On July 9, 1869, the Prince of Wales agreed to unveil GP’s seated statue near Royal Exchange, London).


Times, July 22, 1869, p. 6, c. 6 (“Minutes of the Committee for Erecting a Statue to Mr. George Peabody, 1866-1870,” Ms 192, Corp. of London, Guildhall Library, London, contains this July 22, 1869, and earlier relevant
Times news clips: April 20, 23, May 16, 29, 1867; and July 14, 1869).


Times, July 30, 1869, p. 4, c. 3 (GP spoke at July 14-16, 1869, dedication of Peabody Institute Library, Danvers, Mass.; and Oliver Wendell Holmes read his “George Peabody” poem, July 16, 1869; similar to Peabody Press, July 14, 1869, p. 2, c. 2, 4-5, entry above).


Times, Oct. 27, 1869, p. 7, c. 3 (Reported GP dangerously ill at 80 Eaton Sq., London, home of business friend Sir Curtis M. Lampson).


Times, Oct. 29, 1869, p. 7, c. 2; and Oct. 30, 1869, p. 9, c. 4 (Report of GP’s serious illness at business friend Sir Curtis Miranda Lampson’s 80 Eaton Sq., London home; similar to London’s Anglo-American
Times, Oct. 23, 1869, p. 11, c. 3; and Oct. 30, 1869, p. 10, c. 3. entries above).


Times, Oct. 30, 1869, p. 8, c. 2 (Queen Victoria’s invitation, Oct. 30, 1869, for GP to visit and rest at Windsor Castle.
Too ill to accept, he died Nov. 4, 1869; similar to New York Tribune, Nov. 12, 1869, p. 1, c. 1, entry above).


Times, Nov. 4, 1869, p. 7, c. 3 (Report of GP’s grave illness at business friend Sir Curtis Miranda Lampson’s 80 Eaton Sq., London home; similar to London’s Anglo-American Times, Oct. 23, 1869, p. 11, c. 3; and Oct. 30, 1869, p. 10, c. 3. entries above).


Times, Nov. 10, 1869, p. 5, c. 5 (PM W.E. Gladstone said in his Dec. 9, 1869, Lord Mayor’s speech, London, “… With the country of Mr. Peabody we are not likely to quarrel…,”
easing U.S.-British tension over the Alabama Claims).


Times, Nov. 15, 1869, p. 7 (GP funeral researcher Allen Howard Welch cited this source for stating that Queen Victoria first suggested that a Royal naval man-of-war transfer GP’s remains to the U.S.
Pres. U.S. Grant deferred to the Queen but ordered a U.S. warship to escort the British funeral vessel).


Times, Dec. 4, 1869, p. 9 (Described HMS Monarch, painted slate gray and outfitted in Portsmouth, England, during Nov. 23 to Dec. 11, 1869, as funeral ship to transport GP’s remains for burial in the U.S.).


Times, Dec. 9, 1869, p. 4, c. 2 (Mistaken reports of statues of GP to be erected in Rome, Italy, and NYC.
NYC meetings on Nov. 20 and 23, 1869, failed to gain support for a GP statue; the reason later given was that mounting honors for GP offended belief in republican simplicity; similar to London Morning Herald, Dec. 9, 1869, p. 6, c. 2, entry above).


Times, Dec. 10, 1869, p. 3, c. 5 (GP’s Nov. 4, 1869, death in London; his Westminster Abbey funeral service, Nov. 12, 1869; transfer of the remains from the Abbey to Waterloo station; similar to London Sun, Dec. 13, 1869, p. 2, c. 2, entry above).


Times, Dec. 13, 1869, p. 6, c. 1-2 (Eulogies on GP from:
1-French novelist Victor Hugo ["America has reason to be proud of this great citizen of the world, and great brother of all men....
Having a place near Rothschild, he found means to change it for one near Vincent de Paul"] and
2-French political writer Louis Blanc ["The death of...George Peabody...is a public calamity, in which the whole civilized world ought to share.
I...mourn, for the illustrious American whose life was of such value to the most needy of his fellow-men.... The number of mourners...[at the Abbey], their silent sorrow, the tears shed by so many…of London, the readiness of the shopkeepers [in] closing their shops and lowering their blinds,–these were the homages…due one whose title in history will be…–the friend of the poor”]).


Times, Dec. 14, 1869, p. 4, c. 2 (Bostonians believed their city would receive GP’s remains from HMS Monarch, but on Dec. 14, 1869, the British Admiralty chose Portland, Me., as receiving port because of its deeper harbor).


Times, Dec. 14, 1869, p. 10, c. 3 (Thousands visited the HMSMonarch, outfitted as a funeral ship with GP’s remains aboard, and escort vessel USS Plymouth, both detained at Spithead near Portsmouth by bad weather during Dec. 11-20, 1869).


Times, Dec. 16, 1869, p. 10, c. 1; and Dec. 23, 1869, p. 5, c. 1 (U.S. House Resolution No. 96 for a U.S. Navy reception of GP’s remains from England at U.S. landing port [Portland, Me.], introduced in the House, Dec. 15, 1869; debated and passed in the House, Dec. 21, 1869; passed in Senate, Dec. 23, 1869, and signed into law by Pres. Grant, Jan. 10, 1870; similar to New York Times, Dec. 22, 1869, p. 1, c. 4, entry above).


Times, Dec. 24, 1869, p. 7 (In late Nov. 1869 the USS Richmond, then in the Mediterranean, and the USS Kenosha were ordered to accompany HMS Monarch in transporting GP’s remains from England to the U.S.
But for unknown reasons neither arrived in Portsmouth, England).


Times, Dec. 24, 1869, p.10, c. 3; and
April 14, 1870, p. 10, c. 3 (GP’s last will was written and witnessed in NYC, Sept. 9, 1869, and recorded in Salem, Mass., Sept. 10, 1869; similar to Salem Observer[Mass.], Jan. 15, 1870, entry above).


Times, Feb. 10, 1870, p. 5, c. 1 (Philanthropic advisor Robert Charles Winthrop’s widely reprinted Feb. 8, 1870, GP funeral eulogy; similar to New York Times, Feb. 9, 1870, p. 1, c. 4-7, entry above).


England. Manchester Guardian


Manchester Guardian, Nov. 2, 1869, p. 5, c. 6; and Nov. 3, 1869, p. 5, c. 3 (Report of GP’s dying condition at business friend Sir Curtis Miranda Lampson’s 80 Eaton Sq., London home; similar to London’s Anglo-American Times, Oct. 23, 1869, p. 11, c. 3; and Oct. 30, 1869, p. 10, c. 3. entries above).


Manchester Guardian, Nov. 15, 1869, p. 2, c. 7 (Bishop of London’s sermon on GP’s life and influence, Westminster Abbey, Sunday, Nov. 14, 1869.
Similar to New York Times, Nov. 27, 1869, p. 1, c. 6-7).


Manchester Guardian, Nov. 25, 1869, p. 7, c. 4; and Nov. 26, 1869, p. 3, c. 2 (Comment that PM W.E. Gladstone’s Nov. 9, 1869, Lord Mayor’s speech, London, “… With the country of Mr. Peabody we are not likely to quarrel,” suggested easing of U.S.-British tension over and likely settlement of Alabama Claims).


Manchester Guardian, Dec. 22, 1869, p. 5, c. 1 (HMS Monarch, with GP’s remains aboard, accompanied by USS Plymouth, left Spithead near Portsmouth, England, 1:00 A.M, Dec. 21, 1869; stopped at Funchall Bay, Madeira, Portugal, for coaling; went to Bermuda; and to New England receiving port).


Manchester Guardian, Dec. 27, 1869, p. 4, c. 1
(GP’s last will written and witnessed in NYC, Sept. 9, 1869, and recorded in Salem, Mass., Sept. 10, 1869; similar to London Times, Dec. 24, 1869, p. 10, c. 3; and April 14, 1870, p. 10, c. 3).


England. Jackson’s Oxford Journal


Jackson’s Oxford Journal, June 29, 1867, p. 5, c. 4-6 (“The lion of the day was beyond a doubt, Mr. Peabody,” read the account describing Oxford Univ.’s honorary Doctor of Laws degree awarded to GP June 26, 1867, five years after he founded the Peabody Donation Fund for building low-rent housing for London’s working poor, March 12, 1862 [total gift $2.5 million, 1862-69]).


England. Oxford Chronicle and Berks and Bucks Gazette


Oxford Chronicle and Berks and Bucks Gazette, June 29, 1867, p. 5, c. 1-2 (Similar to Jackson’s Oxford Journal, June 29, 1867, c. 4-6, immediately above).


England. Oxford
Times


Oxford
Times, June 29, 1867, p. 6, c. 2 (Similar to Jackson’s Oxford Journal, June 29, 1867, c. 4-6; and Oxford Chronicle and Berks and Bucks Gazette, June 29, 1867, p. 5, c. 1-2, both immediately above).


England. Oxford University Herald


Oxford University Herald, June 29, 1867, p. 9, c. 3 and p. 10, c. 1-3 (Similar to the three entries immediately above).


England. Oxford University Journal


Oxford University Journal, June 27, 1867, p. 5, c. 4-6 (Similar to the four entries immediately above).


England, Portsea.
Portsmouth Times and Naval Gazette


Portsmouth Times and Naval Gazette, Dec. 18, 1869, p. 6, c. 3-5 (Handing over ceremony of GP’s remains from Westminster Abbey, London, to Portsmouth harbor on Dec. 11, 1869, and placing the coffin aboard HMS Monarch for transatlantic crossing to New England; similar to New York Times, Dec. 14, 1869, p. 5, c. 1, entry above).


Portsmouth Times and Naval Gazette,
Feb. 12, 1870, p. 4, c. 4 (HMS Monarch, with GP’s remains aboard, accompanied by USSPlymouth, left Spithead near Portsmouth, England, 1:00 A.M, Dec. 21, 1869, to Funchall Bay, Madeira, Portugal, for coaling; to Bermuda; reached Portland, Maine, Jan. 25, 1870).


England, Portsmouth. Hampshire Telegraph


Hampshire Telegraph, Dec. 11, 1869, p. 4 (On Dec. 8, 1869, First Lord of the Admiralty H.C.E. Childers boarded HMS Monarch in Portsmouth, England, to inspect preparations to receive GP’s remains for transatlantic crossing).


Hampshire Telegraph, Dec. 11, 1869, p. 8, c. 1-2 (GP funeral train timetable, on cold and damp Dec. 11, 1869, from London’s Waterloo Station to Portsmouth harbor, for placement aboard HMS Monarch: left Waterloo Station, 12:30 P.M., Guilford, 1:23 P.M., Petersfield, 2:12 P.M., Rowlands Castle, 2:26 P.M., Havant, 2:34 P.M., and Portsmouth, 2:41 P.M.).


Hampshire Telegraph, Dec. 15, 1869, p. 3, c. 2-4 (GP’s death, Nov. 4, 1869, London; Westminster Abbey funeral service, Nov. 12, 1869; funeral carriages and occupants from the Abbey to Waterloo train station; funeral train from London to Portsmouth harbor, Dec. 11, 1869; Portsmouth handing over ceremonies and speeches; and placing GP’s coffin aboard HMSMonarch
for transatlantic crossing to New England; similar toBirmingham [England] Weekly Post, Dec. 18, 1869, p. 3, c. 6, entry above).


Hampshire Telegraph, Dec. 22, 1869, p. 2, c. 5 (U.S. House Resolution No. 96 for U.S. Navy reception of GP’s remains from England at U.S. landing port [Portland, Me.], introduced in the House, Dec. 15, 1869; debated and passed in House, Dec. 21, 1869; passed in Senate, Dec. 23, 1869; and signed into law by Pres. Grant, Jan. 10, 1870; similar to New
York Times, Dec. 22, 1869, p. 1, c. 4, entry above).


Hampshire Telegraph, Jan. 8, 1870, p. 4, c. 3 (Listed State of Maine preliminary plans to receive GP’s remains from HMSMonarch at Portland harbor; also quoted in Boston Daily Advertiser, Dec. 23, 1869, p. 2, c. 3).


Hampshire Telegraph, Jan. 8, 1870, p. 4, c. 5 (Quoted a USSPlymouth officer, accompanying funeral ship HMS Monarch: “Left Spithead 21st, [Dec. 21, 1869] and kept on the starboard quarter of the Monarch as long as we could, but on the 2nd day out, the wind freshening, we separated during the night, at which we were very pleased, for there was always some nonsense about going too fast or too slow, and no end of signals.
I am sure the separation was a great relief to both ships. We had beautiful weather after crossing the Bay of Biscay. Christmas Day was as bright and lovely as the month of June….”).


Hampshire Telegraph & Sussex Chronicle


Hampshire Telegraph & Sussex Chronicle,
Nov. 10, 1869, “Portsmouth Town Council: Election of Mayor” (Portsmouth Alderman George Sheppard, elected mayor, Nov. 9, 1869, participated in the Dec. 11, 1869, transfer of GP’s remains from London’s Westminster Abbey to Portsmouth harbor for placing aboard HMS Monarch).


Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle, Nov. 27, 1869, p. 4 (In late Nov. 1869 the USS Richmond, then in the Mediterranean, and the USS Kenosha were ordered to accompany HMS Monarch in transporting GP’s remains from Portsmouth, England, to the U.S. but they never arrived in Portsmouth, England).


England. Sheffield Times


Sheffield
Times, Dec. 18, 1869, p. 12, c. 2 (Handing over ceremony of GP’s remains from Westminster Abbey, London, to Portsmouth harbor on Dec. 11, 1869, and placing the coffin aboard HMS Monarch for transatlantic crossing to New England; similar to New York Times, Dec. 14, 1869, p. 5, c. 1, entry above).


England, St. Albans. Herts Advertiser and St. Albans Times


Herts Advertiser and St. Albans
Times, Nov. 20, 1869, p. 3, c. 1-2 (Bishop of London’s sermon on GP’s life and influence, Westminster Abbey, Sunday, Nov. 14, 1869. Similar to New York Times, Nov. 27, 1869, p. 1, c. 6-7).


Herts Advertiser and St. Albans Times, Dec. 18, 1869, p. 2, c. 2 (“Mr. Peabody’s noble example seems to be gaining strength….
M.M. Reicenheim, bankers at Berlin, have presented the Jewish community of that city with 250,000 thalers for the erection of an orphan asylum”).


Scotland.
Aberdeen Free Press


Aberdeen Free Press, Dec. 17, 1869, p. 5, c. 2 (Thousands visit HMS Monarch, outfitted as a funeral ship with GP’s remains aboard, and escort vessel USS Plymouth, both detained at Spithead near Portsmouth by bad weather during Dec. 11-20, 1869).


Aberdeen Free Press, Dec. 28, 1869, p. 4, c. 5 (GP’s last will was written and witnessed in NYC, Sept. 9, 1869, and recorded in Salem, Mass., Sept. 10, 1869; similar to Salem Observer [Mass.], Jan. 15, 1870, entry above).


Scotland.
Aberdeen Herald


Aberdeen Herald, Nov. 13, 1869, p. 3, c. 1 (Same as immediately above).

Aberdeen Herald, Nov. 20, 1869, p. 3, c. 3; and Nov. 27, 1869, p. 4, c. 5 (On plans to transfer GP’s remains from Westminster Abbey, London, to Portsmouth harbor for placing the coffin aboard HMS Monarch for transatlantic crossing to New England).


Scotland, Ayr.
Ayrshire Express


Ayrshire Express, Dec. 11, 1869, p. 4, c. 4-5 (“The honour thus paid to [GP's] memory is of course well deserved, but still it does seem strange to employ two vessels of war to take the ‘silent dust’ of the deceased across the Atlantic.
If both vessels took over a hundred or a hundred and fifty emigrants each to lessen the burden of our poverty and misery here, this would be doing a good work far more in accordance with the ideas of the kindhearted man we have lost than is this extravagant employment of men and ships”).


Scotland. Dundee Courier and Argus


Dundee Courier and Argus, Nov. 9, 1869,
p. 3, c. 5 (The erroneous report of a GP statue in Rome after GP’s death, Nov. 4, 1869, London, may have been connected with R.C. Winthrop and GP’s Feb. 24 or 25, 1868 interview with Pope Pius IX, and GP’s gift through Cardinal Antonelli to the Vatican charitable San Spirito Hospital of $19,300; similar to London’s Catholic Opinion, Nov. 20, 1869, p. 462, c. 1, entry above).


Dundee Courier and Argus, Dec. 6, 1869, p. 3, c. 4 (Described embalming of GP’s remains by Dr. Frederick W. Pavy of Guy’s Hospital, London, Nov. 7 or 8, 1869, possibly assisted by Dr. William Withey Gull, M.D.).


Dundee Courier and Argus, Dec. 13, 1869, p. 3, c. 4 (Handing over ceremony of GP’s remains from Westminster Abbey, London, to Portsmouth harbor on Dec. 11, 1869, and the placing of the coffin aboard HMS Monarch for transatlantic crossing to New England; similar to Ohio’s Zanesville Daily Courier, Dec. 10, 1869, p. 3, c. 5, entry above).


Dundee Courier and Argus, Dec. 14, 1869, p. 3, c. 3 (Erroneous reports of statues of GP to be erected in Rome, Italy, and NYC; similar to plans mentioned in London Morning Herald, Dec. 9, 1869, p. 6, c. 2; and London Times, Dec. 9, 1869, p. 4, c. 2, both entries above).


Dundee Courier and Argus,
Dec. 17, 1869, p. 3, c. 4 (Thousands visited HMS Monarch, outfitted as a funeral ship with GP’s remains aboard, and escort vessel USS Plymouth, both detained at Spithead near Portsmouth by bad weather during Dec. 11-20, 1869. U.S. House Resolution No. 96 asked Pres. U.S. Grant to order a naval reception of GP’s remains from England “with the…dignity of a great people.” This resolution was introduced in the House on Dec. 15, 1869; debated and passed in the House on Dec. 21, 1869; passed in the Senate on Dec. 23, 1869, and signed into law by Pres. Grant on Jan. 10, 1870).


Scotland, Edinburgh.
Scotsman


Scotsman, Oct. 28, 1869, p. 8; Nov. 1, 1869, p. 3; and Nov. 3, 1869, p. 3 (Report of GP’s failing health at business friend Sir Curtis Miranda Lampson’s 80 Eaton Sq., London home; similar to London’s Anglo-American
Times, Oct. 23, 1869, p. 11, c. 3; and Oct. 30, 1869, p. 10, c. 3. entries above).


Scotsman, Oct. 29, 1869, p. 8 (Dangerously ill at 80 Eaton Sq., London, home of business friend Sir Curtis M. Lampson, GP was reported as “somewhat rallied, but no hopes were entertained of his recovery”).


Scotland.
Glasgow Citizen


Glasgow Citizen, April 12, 1862, p. 7, c. 2 (Member of London’s Court of Common Council Charles Reed made public his intention to introduce a resolution that the Freedom of the City of London be offered to GP for his March 12, 1862, gift of housing for London’s working poor, an honor GP received July 10, 1862).


Scotland. Inverness Advertiser


Inverness Advertiser, Nov. 16, 1869, p. 2, c. 3 (GP’s funeral service at Westminster Abbey, London, Nov. 12, 1869, and plans for handing over ceremony of remains to Portsmouth harbor and placing the coffin aboard HMS Monarch
for transatlantic crossing to New England).


Scotland. Inverness Courier


Inverness Courier, Nov. 18, 1869, p. 5, c. 3 (“Much of the honour done to Mr. Peabody is due to the fact that it is an American who has done all this.
A countryman of our own could not expect to have his charities thus recognized…. It may be hoped that the honours which have been heaped upon Mr. Peabody during his life, and since death, will have a stimulating effect upon other rich men to devote their wealth to the benefit of their fellow-creatures. Such honours have hardly ever been bestowed before except upon crowned heads…”


End Newspapers End


g.
Internet (World Wide Web): alphabetically by last name of author or subject or title or holding institution.


(Note: internet URLs were carefully recorded with the date seen by the authors but are frequently changed, moved,
or removed).


“About the Yale Peabody Museum,” 2 pp. (seen June 29, 1999) URL: http://www.peabody.yale.edu/history/
See: Peabody Museum of Natural History, below.


Agard, Leslie, teacher and author, Kamehameha Schools, Honolulu, Hawaii (her email: leagard@ksbe.edu), in her article, “Bernice Pauahi Paki Bishop (1831-1883), Hawaiian Ali`i and Founder of Kamehameha Schools,” Notable American Philanthropists, ed. By Robert Thornton Grimm (Westport, Conn.;
Greenwood Press and Onyx Press, to appear in 2002), relates GP’s philanthropic influence on Hawaii Princess Bernice Pauahi Paki Bishop and her Mass.-born husband Charles Reed Bishop (founders of the Kamehameha Schools and the Bernice Pauahi Paki Bishop Museum, both Honolulu, Hawaii). See: “Bishop Estate’s…, below). Bishop, Bernice Pauahi Paki.


Alabama, CSS (Confederate ship).
The Univ. of Ala. Libraries, URL: http://www.lib.ua.edu/hoole/cssala/main.htm has several relevant articles, including John M. Browne, “The Duel Betweenthe Alabama and The ‘Kearsarge.”


Associated Press, “Milestones in J.P. Morgan History,” AP Online, 09-13-2000, 2 pp., traced J.P. Morgan Co. from its Dec. 1838 George Peabody & Co., London, origins, to J.S. Morgan’s partnership with GP, 1854, to his son, J.P. Morgan, Sr.’s career as NYC agent for that firm, through J.P. Morgan, Sr. and his son, J.P. Morgan, Jr.’s careers, to Sept. 13, 2000, merger with Chase Manhattan Bank.


Bell, John (of Bennett and Bell), 6 pp. “Jobling, Greener and Corning: Sunderland Glass,” Angela Bowey’s Online Glass Museum, New Zealand (History of the glassware firm in England that made GP commemorative glassware after his death, with two (top and bottom) of GP dish Rd No. 236921, design registered Dec. 7, 1869, p. 2; seen Feb. 24, 2000) URL: http://www.glass.co.nz/jobling.htm


“Bishop Estate’s first trustees played key role in overthrow,”Honolulu Advertiser, Hawaii, article on Charles Reed Bishop who married Hawaiian Princess Bernice Pauahi Paki.
She founded the Kamehameha Schools, Honolulu. He, influenced by GP’s words and example, founded the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Hawaii’s most important museum, and other charities. URL: http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/2000/Mar/12/opinion6.htmlThere is also a biographical sketch of Charles Reed Bishop in “The Legacy of a Hawaiian Princess,” URL: http:/www.ksbe.edu/estate/trustees/teegaly.html Note: Grateful thanks for helpful information. See: Agard, Lesley, above.


“Bright, John,” by Marjorie Bloy, 2 pp.
Biographical sketch of GP’s friend, British MP John Bright. URL:http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/hypertext/landow/victorian/history/bright.html


“Broadside” announcing “Peabody Reception…Thursday, October 9th, 1856….A Public Dinner…” URL:
http://www.peabody.harvard.edu/archives/broadside.html(seen Aug 14, l999).


“Capitalists & Financiers: Wealth and Empire Builders,” Internet URL (seen Dec, 29, 2003): http://www.kipnotes.com/CapitalistsFinanciers.htm
has a photo of GP, standing, in old age, no description given. To the left of his photo is a list of three books about GP.


Catto, Rt. Hon. Lord (Sir Stephen Gordon, 1923-), former head of the Morgan Grenfell Group banking firm, lineal descendant of George Peabody & Co. (1838-64), participated in the “Bicentenary Service of Thanksgiving for the Life and Work of George Peabody, 1795-1869,” in London’s Westminster Abbey, Nov. 16, 1995. Career URL:
http://www.knowuk.co.uk (seen Dec. 9, 1999). See: GP Bicentennial Celebrations (Feb. 18, 1795-1995).


Civil War Preservations, 3650 Nazareth Pike #144, Bethlehem, Pa 18020, had for sale (U.S. price $45) a GP visiting card (Carte de Visite) photograph, size 2.5″x4″, year c1860, URL: http://www.civilwarpreservations.com/catdet.asp?TargetItem=SM416&CategoryType=CDV, seen Dec. 26, 2003.
For other GP visiting card photographs, See: P., G., Illus.:picturehistory, and P., G., Illus.: R. Rigge, Henry.


Crowe, William J., Jr. (b. 1925).
Career of former U.S. Navy Admiral, later U.S. Ambassador to Britain (1994-97), who participated in the “Bicentenary Service of Thanksgiving for the Life and Work of George Peabody, 1795-1869,” in London’s Westminster Abbey, Nov. 16, 1995. Seen Dec. 9, 1999, URL: http://www.knowuk.co.uk See: GP Bicentennial Celebrations (Feb. 18, 1795-1995).


Dudley, Robert (fl. 1865-91), artist whose painting, “HMSMonarch Transporting the Body of George Peabody,” 1870, large oil on canvas, 43″ x 72,” depicted the British warship HMSMonarch, leaving Portsmouth harbor, England, to transport GP’s remains across the Atlantic for burial in New England, accompanied by the USS corvette Plymouth.
A photo by Mark Sexton of the painting is on the cover of The American Neptune, Fall 1995 (published at the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Mass.), and identified as “a recent museum acquisition in recognition of the bicentennial of George Peabody’s birth. URL: http://www.pem.org/neptune/desc554.htm (seen Dec. 29, 1999).See: American Neptune. GP Bicentennial Celebration (Feb. 18, 1795-1995). GP Illustrations. Peabody Essex Museum.


“Education: a debt due from present to future generations.”
GP’s 1852 motto, sent with his May 26, 1852, letter from London, containing his check founding his first Peabody Institute Library, Danvers, Mass. (name changed to South Danvers, 1855-68, and then to Peabody, Mass., April 13, 1868). The source and prior use of GP’s motto is not known. The motto is listed in URL: http://www.quoteworld.org/search.php?thetext=George+Peabody The motto has been widely used through the years by Peabody institutes in their publications and has most recently been used on at least three web sites:
1-a site seen 4-12-01 describing the museums of Western Australia:
(http://www.cultureandarts.wa.gov.au/cainwa/museums.asp);
2-a web page seen 8-23-01 from the Director of Development, College of Natural Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo. (http://www.colostate.edu/Depts/NatSci/html/Endowment.html); and
3-”The Order of the Golden Shillelagh” fund raisers founded 1977 at the Univ. of Missouri-Rollo, Colorado), seen 8-23-01 (http://www.umr.edu/%7Edevelop/ogs/).
Note: St. Patrick carried a shillelagh or club in defense of his followers.


“George Peabody Remembered,” 2 pp., (seen Aug. 4, 1999). URL: http://www.peabodylibrary.org/history/george.shtml
See: “Education: a debt due from present to future generations.”


Everett, Edward (1794-1865), Speech, at the Dinner Given in Honor of George Peabody, Esq., of London, by the Citizens of the Old Town of Danvers, October 9, 1856
(Boston: H.W. Dutton & Son, 1857). His full Oct. 9, 1856, speech on the internet (seen Dec. 24, 20004): http://www.hti.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;idno=AEM7072.0001.001


George Peabody (ship) was a $90,000 steamship built by
the Powhatan Steamship Co. of Baltimore in mid-1857, believed to have been so named after GP’s Feb. 12, 1857, PIB gift was announced. Commanded by Capt. Pritchard, it was the largest freighter then in the Chesapeake Bay trade and steamed between Baltimore, Petersburg, Va., and Richmond, Va. The Library of Congress has two pencil sketches of this steamship by artist Alfred Rudolph Waud (1828-91) made between 1860-65, the gifts of John Pierpont Morgan, Jr. (1867-1943), in 1919. URL (seen Jan. 2002):http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?pp/dwgd: @FIELD (SUBJ+@band(++George+Peabody++Steamshp+++


“George Peabody Wetmore [1846-1921],” son of William Shephard Wetmore (1802-62), GP’s longtime business friend.
GP Wetmore, born in London during his parents visit there, was named after GP; had a distinguished career as R.I. governor (1885-86) and U.S. senator (R, R.I, 1894-1913); and was a trustee of the PEF and of the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale Univ. (Seen March 3, 2000) URL: http://reed.senate.gov/senators’wetmore.htm


Great Exhibition of 1851, London, 1 p.
1-Book review of John R. Davis, The Great Exhibition (New York: Sutton Publishing) inBritish Heritage (Dec. 2000/Jan. 20001), described itssignificance to Britain and the U.S. URL: http://www.thehistorynet.com/reviews/bk_bhdec00lead.htm2-U.S. Senate debate on repaying GP’s $15,000 loan to U.S. exhibitors, Great Exhibition of 1851, London, include: a-”Memorials for expenses incurred by American contributors to Industrial Exhibition on London. Senate Rep. 114 (32nd Congress, First Session) Reel 630,” 1851-52. b-Washington, D.C.,Congressional Globe, July 25, 1854, pp. 1902-1903. c-.Internet (seen August 31, 2003):http//memory.loc.gov/ammem/amlaw/lawhome.html


“Famous Peabodys of the Past,” 18 pp., URL: http://www.pbdy.com/famous.html
(seen April 23, 1999).


Harding, Chester (1792-1866), 2 pp., Conway, Mass.-born artist who painted a portrait of GP.
Author Leah Lipton, Grove Dictionary of Art Online (seen Feb. 9, 2000) URL: http://www.groveart.com


Healy, George Peter Alexander (1813-94), 2 pp., Boston-born artist who painted a portrait of GP.
Author Sally Mills, Grove Dictionary of Art Online, URL: http://www.groveart.com (seen Feb. 9, 2000).


“History of Peabody Hall,” Univ. of Fla., Gainesville.
See: Peabody, George. Institutions, Buildings, & Other Facilities Named for GP. URL: http://www.dso.ufl.edu/peabody.html(seen Feb. 24, 2000).


“Hoffman, David (1784-1854).”
Contains Hoffman’s Dictionary of American Biography entry as Baltimore-born lawyer and professor [he helped found the Univ. of Md. Law School] and was land agent for Calif. leader John Charles Frémont. While in England in 1850 Hoffman wrote two letters asking GP ‘s financial help in an escape plan to free imprisoned Hungarian freedom fighter Lajos Kossuth. Also has Hoffman’s obituary, BaltimoreSun, Nov. 13, 1854, Vol. 35, No. 154, p. 2, c. 1; and other information. URL:http://law.umaryland.edu/marshall/Hoffman/hoffa.htm


Lampson, Lady, Jane Walter (nee Sibley, d. April 13, 1891), who married Curtis Miranda Lampson (1806-85), NYC, Nov. 30, 1827, GP’s longtime friend in whose London home he died.
URL source is www.e-familytree.net/f7182.htm (seen Dec. 25, 2002), which listed her last (maiden) name and death year. See: Lampson, Curtis Miranda.


Lane, Harriet (1830-1903), was Pres. James Buchanan’s (1791-1868) niece who acted as his hostess in London and in Washington, D.C., mentioned by GP; her biographical sketch is in URL:
http://www.whitehouse.gov/WH/glimpse/firstladies/html/h115.html(seen Aug. 3, 1999).


Lanier, Sidney (1842-81), Macon, Ga.-born poet and musician, was a 31-year-old law clerk seeking a NYC music career when he stopped in Baltimore to visit his flutist friend Henry Wysham in 1873.
Wysham introduced him to PIB Academy (later Conservatory) of Music Dir. Asger Hamerik (1843-1923).Impressed when Lanier played his own flute compositions, Hamerik hired Lanier as the Peabody Symphony Orchestra’s first flutist. Lanier lived in Baltimore near the PIB for eight years, assiduously used its research library, lectured at the PIB and Johns Hopkins Univ. on music and literature, and died at age 39 of tuberculosis contracted as a Civil War Confederate prisoner.See:
1-Project Gutenberg Etext #1224, dated Feb. 1998, of Sidney Lanier by Edwin Mims.
URL: ftp://sailor.gutenberg.org/pub/gutenberg/etext98/lanrb10.txt(seen May 24, 2000).
2-”Sidney Clopton Lanier” 1 p., URL:
http://users.erols.com/kfraser/lanier.htm (seen May 20, 2000).


Macomb, William H. (1819-72), Captain of the corvette USSPlymouth, ordered by the U.S. Navy (during Nov. 12-15, 1869) from Marseilles, France, to accompany British warship HMSMonarch in returning GP’s remains from Portsmouth, England, to Portland, Maine, for burial in Salem, Mass.
Details of Capt. Macomb’s career were sent to the authors in an E-mail, Aug. 11, 2000, by Sr. Curator James W. Cheevers, U.S. Naval Academy Museum, Annapolis, Md., cheevers@nadn.navy.mil In Ref.: see Hamersly, p. 61. See also Death and Funeral, GP’s. Macomb, William H.


“McCorkle, Joseph Walker, 1819-84,” Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774-Present (Representative from Calif. during 1851-53 who, sources state, financially backed the invention of an early electric light bulb by John W. Starr (c.1822-c.1847) of Cincinnati, Ohio, whose lawyer patented the invention in London in 1845.
Sources also state that GP also financially backed Starr whose death about 1846-47 halted further development of the invention). For fuller account see Starr, John W. McCorkle biographical sketch on Internet: http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=M000362&_wsgeturl3a85c35c2fd4d9c0_ff (seen Feb. 10, 2001).


Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore, Md., has, besides GP portrait, a signed GP photo, 1867, cataloged as Z24.1354, seen Internet (Feb. 2002): http://www.mdhs.org/library/Z24Port2.html


Maryland State Archives, 350 Rowe Blvd., Annapolis, Md. 21401, phone (800)-235-4045.
See: GP material in Md. State Archives URL: http://mdarchives.state.md.us


“Mathew Brady Gallery, NYC,” listed an illustration of GP standing, in old age, from below the waist upward, left hand resting on chair, with following description: “Imperial salted paper print, 46″ x 38.9,” National Portrait Gallery 76.87 ca. 1860″: URL:
http://www.npg.si.edu/exh/brady/gallery/75gal.html (seen April 9, 1999).


Marsh, Othniel Charles (1832-1899), 2 pp. Career, URL: http://www.peabody.yale.edu/people/whoswho/MarshOC.html
seen June 29, 1999).


Mayne, Very Rev. Michael Clement Otway (1929-).
Career of the Dean and Chapter of Westminster who received the Lord Mayor of Westminster (believed to have been Councilor Alan Bradley), at the “Bicentenary Service of Thanksgiving for the Life and Work of George Peabody, 1795-1869,” in London’s Westminster Abbey, Nov. 16, 1995. (Seen Dec. 9, 1999), URL: http://www.knowuk.co.uk See: GP Bicentennial Celebrations (Feb. 18, 1795-1995).


Mills, Robert 1781-1885), architect of the Washington Monument, Washington, D.C., to which GP contributed $1,000 in 1854.
For Robert Mills’ biographical sketch see: Windsor R. Liscombe, “Mills, Robert,” American National Biography OnlineFeb. 2000 (seen Thursday, August 19, 2004), URL: http://www.anb.org/articles/17/17-00590.html


Monarch, HMS (1868-1904), largest British warship when launched, was funeral ship (escorted by USS Plymouth) which transported GP’s remains from Portsmouth, England (Dec. 1869) to Portland, Maine (Jan. 25, 1870); brief history, statistics; and sketch of (seen Jan. 2002), URL: http://www.btinternet.com/~britishempire/empire/forces/navyships/ironclads/hmsMonarch.htm


Neagle, John (1796-1865), 1 p., Boston-born artist who painted a portrait of GP.
Author Monroe H. Fabian, Grove Dictionary of Art Online (seen Feb. 9, 2000), URL: http://www.groveart.com


Otley, Charles Bethell (1792-1867), was a British artist resident in Florence, Italy, who on April 24, 1863, offered to the Peabody Donation Fund Governors, London, a bust of GP by U.S. sculptor Hiram Powers (1805-73), which they accepted on May 12, 1863.
The bust is displayed in the entrance of the Peabody Trust building in London. For the Protestant cemetery in Florence, Italy, where Otley is buried, see website: http://www.florin.ms/cemetery.html and for his being in that cemetery see website: http://www.florin.ms/cemetery3.html(both seen Dec. 2003). Ref.: Mallalieu, H.L.


Parker, Franklin, and Betty J. Parker.
For their published writings, including many on George Peabody (1795-1869), see URL:http://ericae.net/scripts/texis.exe/scripts/searchw4/AE.html


“Peabody Art Collection, A Treasure for Maryland,” 2 pp. (Needing additional state and private aid to endow the PIB, a Peabody Plan task force headed by then Md. Lt. Gov. Melvin A. Steinberg raised $15 million in state aid plus matching private aid, a goal achieved
under Md. Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend as chair of the Peabody Oversight Committee. In return the Md. State Archives gained title to the PIB Art Gallery collection, June 28, 1996, its treasures housed as before in the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Walters Art Gallery, the Md. Historical Society, the PIB, and elsewhere. (Seen March 2, 2000), URL: http://mdarchives.state.md.us/msa/stagser/s/1259/121/6361/html/history.htmlFor GP biographical sketch, see URL: http://www.mdarchives.state.md.us/msa/stagser/s1259/121/6361/html/bio.html


Peabody Art Collection, A Treasure for Maryland, in the Peabody Institute of Baltimore, oil paintings, MSA SC 4680.
The Commission on Artistic Property of the Maryland State Archives, 18 pp., listed Nov. 5, 1997, URL: http://www.mdarchives.state.md.us/msa/speccol (seen April 25, 1999). For Portrait of Knox, Elizabeth (Mrs. George Carson), with legend: “Lady to whom G. peabody twice offered his hand.”Artist unknown, ca 1840, oil on canvas, 30 x 25, located PIB director’s office, Leakin Hall, designated: MSA SC 4680-1-104-P.1.10.226, URL: http://www.mdarchives.state.md.us/msa/speccol/4680/artist/html/unknown.html(seen c. May 2001).


Peabody Building, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, S.C. (seen March 20, 2004) http://www.winthrop.edu/president/pastpresidents.htm
See:P.,G.: …Named for GP. 23-Peabody Building, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, S.C.


Peabody+George+1795+1869 search led to 64 entries, most of them relevant, seen Dec. 18, 1999, at URL: http://www.alltheweb.com


Peabody, George Foster (1852-1938), was the Columbus, Ga.-born banker, foundation executive, and philanthropist who founded (1901, $5,000 gift) Peabody Park, Univ. of N.C. at Greensboro (see Peabody Park at UNCG below), as a vital refuge for eastern U.S. Piedmont region animals and plants.
He named it for his deceased distant relative GP. George Foster Peabody is today best known for the much-publicized George Foster Peabody Awards in radio and television, established 1939, administered by the Henry W. Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication, Univ. of Ga. Ref.: (seen in Feb. 2000), URL:http://www.peabody.uga.edu/about.index.html


Peabody Historical Society Peabody, Mass., has GP bio sketch in URL: http://www.peabodyhistorical.org/gpeabody.htm


Peabody Homes of London.
See: Peabody Trust Group, London (below).


Peabody Hotel Group.
The Peabody Hotel Group (founded 1960) includes, besides the Peabody Hotel, Memphis, the Peabody Hotel, Orlando, Fla., with the Peabody Hotel, Little Rock, Ark.; and the Peabody Hotel in Tempe, Ariz., under development/renovation as of Sept. 15, 1999. Ref.: Hospitality Online Profile, Peabody Hotel Group (seen Nov. 14, 1999). See: Peabody Hotel, Memphis, Tenn.


[Peabody Hotel, Memphis, Tenn.]. Wilkening, David.
“Hotels Conjure Up Some Famous names (Peabody Hotel in Memphis, TN),” Travel Weekly, (Sept. 25, 2000). (Short description of the Peabody Hotel, Memphis, Tenn.). Seen on the Internet Jan. 1, 2001 at http://www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m3266/77_59/65914074/print.jhtmlSee: Peabody Hotel Group, Memphis, Tenn., “The Peabody, Memphis: The South’s Grand Hotel,” URL: http://www.peabodymemphis.com/


“Peabody Institute Library [Peabody, Mass.] Library History,” 2 pp. (seen Aug. 4, 1999), URL: http://www.peabodylibrary.org/history/libhist.shtml
Also Peabody Institute Library, 15 Sylvan St., Danvers, Mass. 01923, Tel: 978-774-0554, URL: http://www/noblenet.org/danvers


Peabody Library, Thetford, Vt.
In Aug. 1866 GP gave $5,000 for a public library, Thetford, Vt., in memory of his visit there, winter 1810, when he was age 15, to see his maternal grandparents, Jeremiah Dodge (1744-1824) and Judith (née Spofford) Dodge (1749-1828), and their son, his uncle Eliphalet Dodge. The Peabody Library, Thetford, Vt., opened Oct. 9, 1867.(Seen March 18, 2000), URL: http://www.valley.net~conriver/V13-7.htm See: Concord, N.H.Persons named. Thetford, Vt.


Peabody Magnet High School, Alexandria (Rapides Parish), La. 71302, was founded in 1895 with a requested PEF grant as Peabody Industrial School, grades 1-7, the only Black public school in Alexandria.
It became a state approved high school in 1933. Ref.: Internet (seen Aug. 125, 2003): http://rapides.K12.la.us/peabody/. See: P., G.: Named for GP.23.


Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University, New Haven, Conn.
“An Historical ‘Who Was Who’ at the Peabody Museum, has short biographies of founder GP, his nephew first director O.C. Marsh, curators, and Yale College Scientific Expeditions, 1870-73. URL (seen July 22, 2001):http://www.peabody.yale.edu/people/whoswho/


“Peabody Park at UNCG (Univ. of N.C., Greensboro).”
See: Peabody, George Foster (1852-1938), (Seen Aug. 4, 1999), URL: http://biology.uncg.edu/peabody.html Also: peabody.uncg.edu/peabody/gpeabody.html Also: http://bilogy.unc.edu/peabody/gpeabody.html


“Peabody Postcards, A Selection of Postcards Related to the Peabody Family,” 5 pp. (seen Aug. 5, 1999), URL:
http://.www.pbdy.com/postcard.html


The Peabody Schottish.
Dedicated to George Peabody. By Jas. E. MaCruder,” is the music for a round dance (in a circle), resembling a polka, published in Boston, 1857 (“Schottisch” means Scottish). This music is listed on the Internet (seen March 20, 2000), in out-of-print section, URL: http//:www.barnesandnoble.com llc


Peabody Trust Group, London, which manages the Peabody Homes of London, URL: http://ww.peabody.org.uk/frameset_6.htm
has “About Achievements,” highlighting Peabody Trust Group, London, annual report of 1999/2000, and related topic links. The Peabody Trust Group in 2002 owned or managed over 19,000 affordable properties across 30 London boroughs housing nearly 50,000 low income Londoners (about 59% white, 32% black, and 9% others). These include, besides Peabody Trust Group-built estates, other London public housing units whose authorities deliberately chose to come under the Peabody Trust Group because of its efficient management, facilities, playgrounds for the young, recreation for the elderly, computer centers, job training, and job placement for its working adults. Ref.: Peabody Trust Group, London-c, annual report, 2002 (and later reports).“Peabody Buildings,” URL: http://www.vauxhallsociety.org.uk/Peabody.html


Philanthropy, GP’s, worth of: At his death, Nov. 4, 1869, GP’s total philanthropic gifts were variously reported in the press as approaching $10 million (or 2003 relative value of $1,349 million, using the Consumer Price Index), the largest philanthropy to that time (calculated at URL [seen May 22, 2005]: http://eh.net/hmit/compare/

), but less than the $4.8 billion total given by Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919) and of $5.8 billion total given by John D. Rockefeller, Sr. (1839-1937). Ref.: (For GP’s 1869 $10 million gifts equivalency in 2003) See: Ref.: g. Internet: Philanthropic gifts, GP’s. (For Carnegie and Rockefeller, Sr.): Time, Vol. 156, No. 4 (July 24, 2000), p. 52.


picturehistory:
Photo (1867) of GP and 8 of his original 16-member PEF trustees: standing left to right Adm. David Farragut, Hamilton Fish, Gen. U.S. Grant, William Aiken, Charles P. McIlvaine, Samuel Wetmore; seated left GP, J.P. Chase, and Robert Charles Winthrop. See: Peabody, George, Illus. Bryan, Nelson, for their dates and other trustees). Also has 9 other GP photos in old age, some as visiting card photos (Carte de Visite), two by photographer J. Gurney, and one by photographer Disderi. Photos sent free as e-cards or sold by: URL: http://www.picturehistory.com/search?word1=Peabody+Trust+Commission&submit.x=5&submit.y=5(Search for “Peabody Fund Commission,” seen Nov. 19, 2003).


Pickersgill, Henry William (1782-1875), 1 p., London artist who painted a portrait of GP. Grove Dictionary of Art Online (seen Feb. 9, 2000), URL: http://www.groveart.com


“Sands, Joshua Ratoon [1795-1884] – American Naval Officer.”
Biographical sketch of the commander of the U.S. Navy frigateSt. Lawrence authorized by the U.S. Congress to transport U.S. exhibitors and their exhibits to the Great Exhibition of 1851, London, the first world’s fair. The St. Lawrence left NYC Feb. 8, 1851, arrived in Southampton, March 1851, when a lack of funds led to a crisis in transferring the exhibits and to adorning the large space assigned to the U.S. in the Crystal Palace exhibition area. GP’s loan of $15,000 enabled U.S. art and industry to be shown to best effect to over six million visitors. See: “Noted SANDS Relations” genealogical web site seen May 17, 2001, URL: http://freepages.history.rootsweb.com/~dav4is/people/SAND320.htmwas compiled by Roderic A. Davis, 2nd, P.0. Box 118, Hyde Park, NY 12538, E-mail: dav4is@bigfoot.com


Schenley, Capt. Edward W.H.
During GP’s Sept. 15, 1856, to Aug. 19, 1857, U.S. visit, his first return from London in nearly 20 years, he stayed in Pittsburgh, Penn., with Capt. and Mrs. Edward W.H. Schenley during April 14-16, 1857, with a reception held in his honor. For internet and other sources about the Schenleys’ 1842 elopement from the U.S. to England and conjecture about their connection with GP, see Schenley, Capt. Edward W.H.


Slave Trade:
When JP Morgan Chase merged with Chicago’s Bank One, April 2004, Chicago city ordinance required a declaration of any past slave trade connection. Reparations activist (compensation to descendents of slaves for white wealth earned in the slave trade) Chicago Alderwoman Dorothy Tillman traced the firm to GP’s firms in Georgetown, D.C., Baltimore, Md., and London, England. She charged (never proved) that in selling cotton goods he profited from the slave trade. Slave trade reparations against Aetna and other companies, repudiated by a federal district judge Norgle (2004), effectively threw the reparation charge against GP out of court. Black slave reparations demand was first made in 1969 by black civil rights leader James Forman (1929-2005) See: http://www.guardian.co.uk/uslatest/story/0,1282,-4727104,00.html and http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2004/05/04/executive_admits_links_of_firm_founder_slaveryrand http://www.aetna.com/legal_issues/suits/reparations.html000

. Note: For additional sources type in google.com and other search engines: “slave reparations,” “JP Morgan Chase,” “Peabody,” “Chicago,” “Tillman,” and “Norgle.” See: Peabody, George (1795-1869), Critics1-32.


Starr, John Wellington.
Although there is no confirmation in the PEM GP papers, the web site of engineer-researcher Edward J. Covington of Millfield, Ohio, has sources which state that John W. Starr of Cincinnati, Ohio, invented a light source powered by electricity. Starr perfected and displayed his invention in England. His lawyer Edward Augustin King obtained for Starr (but in his [King's] name) English Patent No.10,919 in London in 1845. GP is mentioned as among those who financed the invention. But Starr’s sudden death in 1847 in England halted further exploitation of the invention. Covington’s web site under Topic 72 Starr, URL: http://www.frognet.net/~ejcov/, was seen by the authors in late Jan. 2001. See: Starr, John Wellington.


[Trent, ship], Czech, Kenneth P. “High Seas Brouhaha,”America’s Civil War Magazine (Illegal seizure and removal of Confederate agents James M. Mason, John Slidell, and their male secretaries, bound to seek arms and aid from England and France, from British mail ship Trent, Nov. 8, 1861, Bahama Channel, West Indies, by Union USS San Jacinto, provoking near-war U.S.-British tension and delaying GP’s London housing gift announcement to March 12, 1861), seen Aug., 24, 2005, URL: http://historynet.com/acw/bltrent/index1.html


Wetmore, George Peabody (1846-1921), son of GP’s longtime business friend, William Shepard Wetmore (1802-62), born in London and named for GP.
He was Republican R.I. governor (1885-87), U.S. senator from R.I. (1895-1913), and trustee of the PEF and the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale Univ.See: his congressional biography at URL: http://www.senate/gov/reed/senators/wetmore.html


Wetmore, William Boerum (b. Dec. 7, 1849), son of GP’s business friend Samuel Wetmore (1812-85), one of the original 16 PEF trustees, and at whose NYC home (15 Waverly Place, Greenwich Village) GP stayed several times during his last U.S. visit, June 8 to Sept. 29, 1869.
W. B. Wetmore was a cadet at the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, 1867-72, served in the Indian War of 1874 and the Battle of Red River, and was a cavalry major. Ref.: http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/Wetmore/2002-09/1031277775 (seen Nov. 10, 2004).


End of References from the Internet.


This work expands and updates George Peabody, A Biography, by Franklin Parker, 63 Heritage Loop, Crossville, TN 38571, phone (931) 277-3268 (Nashville, Tenn.: Vanderbilt Univ. Press, ©1971, revised with additional photos ©1995), and authors’ related publications on George Peabody (1795-1869).
Abbreviations are at the beginning; and annotated Refs. are at the end of manuscript.


End of .Concluding 14 of 14 Part Manuscript.
E-mail corrections, questions to:bfparker@frontiernet.net


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