Culture and Houses

1. A Hut of Toda Tribes of South India*
1. A Hut of Toda Tribes of South India*

Overview

Many studies have been published on this topic and much have been talked about it. In 1960s Rappoport published his book in an attempt to prove that the culture was the main determinat of the form of the house. He studied numerous houses that belong to different cultures world over and did a good job in establishing relationaships between culture and the Houses, mainly in relation to traditional societies. Such a relationship of houses with culture ensured that an individual lived in harmony with the society and with the nature. However, the traditional societies lived and still living in many places in enitrely a different context compared to modern, particularly urban societies. Are there any relevance of individual cultures to the houses built in modern societies?

In fact culture is not static. It is changing all the time. Internal as well as external pressures continuously driving cultures to change. Some societies change very slowly and some others very fast. Societies which live in one place for long time with less external interference tend to have continuity in their cultural change. Therefor there are more chances to retain more elements of their house forms. Some conservative societies even when they change considerably, certain aspect of culture such as religious behaviour or some belief system do not change much. This keep some core elements of house design continue.

2. A traditional House in Argentina * 3. An Igloo, Traditional house of Eskimos.*
2. A traditional House in Argentina * 3. An Igloo, Traditional house of Eskimos.*

Photo Courtesy

* These photos have been taken from Wikipedia / Wikimedia Commons.

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Comments 1 comment

monografiaac 8 years ago from Brazil

As a History lover, I enjoyed a lot this hub. There are several examples about how culture and Architecture are related. I think that the most representative is the Greek culture, adopted by Rome and imposed over all Europe, part of Asia and north of Africa.

Another example could be, during the reign of Peter I, the Great of Russia, that translated the capital to St. Petersbourg and imposed an occidental building pattern, with the consequent occidental culture, opening Russia to the rest of Europe.

Very good job!

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