Dancers From Chaos To Transcendental Action Paintings -- A Visual Autobiography

Eighteen years of creative exploration progressed from contemplating the threads of my individual existence to visualizing the fabric of all reality

Drawing and photo by Robert G. Kernodle
Drawing and photo by Robert G. Kernodle

"Fabric Of Existence"

The familiar phrase,"fabric of space and time", is a metaphor that compares the whole universe to a big piece of cloth. Cloth consists of threads, and threads weave together into sheets that fold into intricate layers. The fabric metaphor, thus, depends on the idea of solid strands that intertwine.

But is a liquid stream not a sort of strand too? -- a strand of fluid?

Is a wave front not a sheet? -- a sheet layered in different fluid densities?

Does a fluid not form cells with sheet-like, permeable membranes that agglomerate into greater sheets, which fold into complex dynamic entities? These are questions that arose over the course of eighteen years, during a period of intense introspection, when my dominant filter of perception was artistic, rather than scientific. What came out of these eighteen years was a collection of roughly thirteen artwork series, as illustrated by the following images:

Dancers From Chaos -- These quickly performed black-and-white paintings abbreviate human forms in motion.

Drawings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle
Drawings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle

The Omicron Series -- A series of brute human figure paintings suggests that anatomical boundaries mask the eternal truth about human existence.

Paintings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle
Paintings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle

Celestial Dancers -- Three acrylic paintings represent the idea that human bodies, heavenly bodies and writing systems all originate from the same fluid source.

Paintings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle
Paintings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle

Delta Dancing Series -- A single model, based on a human hair formation serves as a skeleton for six different pencil drawings of the same female figure.

Drawings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle
Drawings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle

Phase 1 Fluidism Painting -- Thick liquid acrylics run freely on planned, painted-canvas backgrounds, stabilizing into abstract impressions of living forms.

Paintings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle
Paintings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle

Phase 2 Fluidism Painting -- Greater form-making freedom becomes apparent in liquid acrylics of various densities, all flowing together on paperboard panels.

Paintings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle
Paintings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle

Phase 3 Fluidism Painting -- The size of paperboard panels increases, and the limitations of the painting media also become obvious.

Paintings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle
Paintings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle

Phase 4 Fluidism Painting -- The size limit of fluidism painting is reached, and the fleeting nature of certain fragile patterns becomes fully apparent.

Paintings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle
Paintings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle

Fluisdism Photography -- Capturing short-lived, elusive fluid patterns requires transcending the paint medium itself, using a camera.

Photos and digital collage by Robert G. Kernodle
Photos and digital collage by Robert G. Kernodle

Cosmic Headpieces -- Inspired by Burne Hogarth's anatomy drawings, these symbolic human-head paintings suggest how we live largely in our heads.

Paintings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle
Paintings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle

Dragon Mammals -- A brief excursion into fantasy art produces a series of pencil drawings in which dragons are based on mammals.

Drawings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle
Drawings and photo by Robert G. Kernodle

Alien Symphony -- A fascination for mysterious symbols (both Earthly and extraterrestrial) inspires visions of musical notation from other worlds.

Paintings, drawings, and photo by Robert G. Kernodle
Paintings, drawings, and photo by Robert G. Kernodle

What I've Done So Far

In creating visual works, an artist often deals in series such as the above, where each series has a signature style. Series (like species) are categories whose members resemble one another, even though each member has its own unique identity within the category. Each series, then, deleneates a stage of artistic evolution.

As strange as it seems, hairs from my own head inspired a closer look at human anatomy, while a closer look at human anatomy inspired a comparative exploration of cosmology, which led ultimately to a view of reality that is fluid, beautiful, deeply purposeful, and abundantly meaningful -- in opposition to the vacant, heartless relativism of post-modern intellectual art.

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Comments 2 comments

RVDaniels profile image

RVDaniels 4 years ago from Athens, GA

That is really thought inducing art. I enjoyed seeing it and hope to see more. Good hub.


Robert Kernodle profile image

Robert Kernodle 4 years ago Author

Yes, thought inducing.

Some visual artists detest thought and verbal expression associated with images. I minimized it here, but I still contend that history is written in words as much as in pictures, and if artists connect good words to the pictures, then historians will more likely get the story straight.

Robert

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