Endeavour Comes to Earth: Thoughts from a Child of the Space Shuttle Program

Endeavour Rides Piggyback

When there was bad weather at Kennedy, the shuttle would land at Edwards AFB in California and hitch a ride back to the Cape. I didn't hear about the reroute in time to get out to the desert, but I heard the sonic booms from this landing in 2008.
When there was bad weather at Kennedy, the shuttle would land at Edwards AFB in California and hitch a ride back to the Cape. I didn't hear about the reroute in time to get out to the desert, but I heard the sonic booms from this landing in 2008. | Source

I Highly Recommend...

When We Left Earth - The NASA Missions [Blu-ray]
When We Left Earth - The NASA Missions [Blu-ray]

I watched episode 5 and 6 of this great minseries tonight. They do an excellent job of covering the triumphs and tragedies of the shuttle program and honoring the two crews who were lost. (Also available on Amazon Instant Video and Netflix, which is how I watched it...using electronics, internet, GPS and wireless tech partly developed by the space program.)

 

Space Shuttle Memories

[9.20.12] When I was little, my father was away for six months.

That happens to a lot of families, for many more difficult reasons. Jobs, military assignments, family problems. Mine was a lucky reason: Dad was a rocket chemist, and his company was helping to build a spaceship.


I was an odd child. I wouldn't speak to Dad on the phone while he was away: that would be admitting that he was gone. Once he came home, however, I started to get excited.


Two years before, I'd wistfully told my parents that "I wish I hadn't been born after the space age." In fact, Viking and Pioneer and other space probes were exploring the inner planets in those days, making all kinds of discoveries. Unfortunately, as far as the news was concerned, America had won the space race, so it wasn't news anymore. Nobody knew that space exploration was still happening above our heads. The year was 1978, and my friends only cared about space stuff happening in a galaxy far, far away.


But now my Dad was building a spaceship. As far as I was concerned, it was my dad's spaceship. I didn't understand how many thousands of people were working on the shuttle program.

I had a sturdy model of it, the space shuttle Enterprise, and it was one of my favorite toys. It had doors that opened and closed, moving wheels under the wings and nose, lots and lots of windows, and a fascinating cluster of rocket nozzles out the back. Another smaller but more detailed model of the space shuttle let me play with its science lab or a mini satellite hooked onto the shuttle's robot arm.

I was one of those Trekkies who waxed indignant at NASA's bait-and-switch when it named the first shuttle Enterprise, thanks to a massive grassroots campaign, then made the Enterprise the test flight model that would never reach space. Columbia sounded more patriotic, less nerdy. So Columbia became my big sister (never mind her age; she was big). I waited for three years.

In April 1981, five days after my tenth birthday, my big sister launched for the first time. I'll always associate that launch with Bradbury's All Summer in a Day. I was at a friend's sleepover party, and the adults promised me they'd wake me to see the first shuttle launch, but then decided "just to let me sleep" after all. Nobody had VCRs, so I missed it.


I didn't miss any launch or landing for years afterwards.


Dad's experiments went up on one Challenger launch, so we watched that one live. For the others, I'd sit with my 1/4th scale fold-out blueprints of the shuttle cockpit arranged around an easy chair in the living room with my egg timer. I'd press all the right buttons when the astronauts did, going down the checklists. We recorded the Challenger launch we saw live, with mission control piped through loudspeakers on the beach, so after that I was able to listen to my recording of the rockets' roar. Those rockets, they were the ones built by my father's company.


Years passed. Shuttle launches started to become routine, and the routine of school stopped me from following the missions so closely. I could no longer rattle off the names of all the crew on each mission or what their patch looked like. Nevertheless, the space shuttle was still very dear to me. It was important. I was proud, too, when one of my teachers participated in the program to send a teacher into space, although she didn't make the final cut. I followed the news about Christa McAuliffe, who did.


Children have odd ways of dealing with terrible things. My friends burst into the school dining hall laughing, eager to surprise me. I thought it was a prank when they cried, "It exploded!" I heard "your father is a murderer" after that. He wasn't on the team that worked on the O rings, and he wasn't part of the mission control team that decided to launch after the temperatures had dropped below freezing overnight, but everyone connected with the program -- and their families -- had to grapple with guilt as well as mourning.


Heavy lessons were learned, and the shuttles flew again. Endeavour was built to replace the Challenger. I think I was a little afraid to get too attached to the new ship.


By college I could no longer tell you whether there was a shuttle flying overhead on any particular day, or what they were doing on that mission. Still, I knew about the big missions like the launch of the amazing Hubble Space Telescope. I knew when the Endeavour's crew pulled off a spacewalk marathon like nothing ever attempted before, fixing all of Hubble's broken gyros, solar panels, optics, making it better than new. The stunning pictures we've gotten since, right to the edge of the universe, make Hubble one of the shuttle's greatest triumphs.


Other shuttle triumphs don't make the news — medical and materials breakthroughs developed through the shuttle's space lab research. Also, the shuttles built the ISS. The space shuttle made many impossible things possible.


After I moved away from home, another surprise: Bob Crippen, the commander of the first shuttle mission, had retired from NASA and became my Dad's boss. In my old Space Shuttle Operator's Manual with the dogeared blueprints, Crip wrote a simple dedication: "Reach for the stars."


More pain. Crippen's shuttle Columbia came down two years before my grandmother, a planetarium director, passed away. Columbia broke apart in the skies over her home in Texas.

I mourn two crews lost: one brave crew reaching for heaven, one crew coming back to Earth after making that incredible journey. Space is risky: astronauts know it and accept it. For us, it was a shocking impossibility. The space shuttle's many flights had lulled us into thinking that spaceflight is routine, not a new, unknown, and still dangerous frontier.


For the final shuttle mission, I got almost no sleep, watching the launch online and keeping up with NASA's final push to deliver thousands of pounds of parts to the ISS. Ironically, I fell asleep just before landing, waking up with the sound of the tires hitting the runway as Atlantis taxied back home. No egg timer and casette tapes that time: I had a laptop on my nightstand and watched NASA TV using technology partly developed by the space program.


Thirty years, 135 missions. Amazing accomplishments, most of them out of the news. Now it's over.

Tomorrow the shuttle flies for the last time over my house in southern California. I'm going out to the highest point I can to get a good look. (Indignity of indignities: my chosen spot will be the top of the Disneyland parking garage). The schedule depends on the weather up north, but it sounds like it'll pass us between 10AM and 11 before Endeavor touches down at LAX.

The last flight of the space shuttle will be like that first shaky test flight of Enterprise strapped to a 747, which happened over southern California skies over 30 years ago. All the orbiters were built here. The youngest, Endeavour, is coming home.

I don't want to see it. And yet I do. In 1983, I watched the Challenger soar into the sky. Now I'll watch her replacement, Endeavour, coming back to Earth for the last time.

I'll post photos here tomorrow.

[Update] Sep 21, 2012: My Photos of Flyover

Not the best angle, but how many people can say they've been directly under the space shuttle?  [Sept 21, 2012, 12:30PM, Anaheim]
Not the best angle, but how many people can say they've been directly under the space shuttle? [Sept 21, 2012, 12:30PM, Anaheim] | Source
The crowd atop the Disneyland parking structure at 10AM. A security guy said there were more people on top of the parking lot than at the park -- that had to be a first! (Probably a couple thousand by noon)
The crowd atop the Disneyland parking structure at 10AM. A security guy said there were more people on top of the parking lot than at the park -- that had to be a first! (Probably a couple thousand by noon) | Source
What's that black speck in the distance that everyone's staring at? It's coming right at us! (My old patch jacket from when I was a kid.)
What's that black speck in the distance that everyone's staring at? It's coming right at us! (My old patch jacket from when I was a kid.) | Source
Incoming!
Incoming! | Source
Closeup of last photo.
Closeup of last photo. | Source
Full-sized version of my "overhead" photo. (Not retouched; I adjusted the contrast on the first version)
Full-sized version of my "overhead" photo. (Not retouched; I adjusted the contrast on the first version) | Source
There it goes! (At 230 mph, it screamed over us really fast)
There it goes! (At 230 mph, it screamed over us really fast) | Source
Closeup of last photo
Closeup of last photo | Source
Farewell, old friend
Farewell, old friend | Source

My Photos of Endeavour Crossing Los Angeles

That was fun, but what was more fun was seeing Endeavour trundling through the streets of Los Angeles on giant trucks.

I took the train up to the city and snapped some amazing photos of the space shuttle Endeavour from about 15 feet away as it approached its new home at the California Science Center. Go see!

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Comments 8 comments

poddys profile image

poddys 4 years ago from Southampton

I remember the flight of the shuttle piggy-backed on it's Boeing 747 carrier in the 1980s when it flew over the River Thames in London. We went down to see it, but somehow missed it.

I have seen a few launches from Florida, one close up from Titusville, and watched many more on NASA TV. They never cease to amaze me.

5 years ago we paid our last visit to Kennedy Space Center and marvelled at the ISS lab, watching the technicians assemble the last modules that were to be sent to the ISS. It was all amazing.

So sad that the shuttle program is no more. With commercial space flight fast becoming a reality, I wonder if we will see hotels in space and tourists going into orbit becoming a regular event.

I am sure that it won't be too long before we establish a permanent base on the Moon, and soon after Mars, but more pressing events back home are sure to delay things for many years.


Greekgeek profile image

Greekgeek 4 years ago from California Author

Treasure all those memories, T.! Wow -- seeing chunks of the ISS -- the scale of that thing is mind-boggling.


poddys profile image

poddys 4 years ago from Southampton

Watching them working on the modules through a glass panel on the side of the building was rather like a scene from a James Bond movie. Awe inspiring.

Also amazing at Kennedy Space Center is the new-ish building that houses the Saturn V rocket. When I first went to KSC in the late 1990s, the Saturn V was on it's side outside the VAB (Vehicle Assembly Building), but now the sections are suspended horizontally in a huge hanger, with tons of information and exhibits. You could spend days at KSC exploring everything.


Greekgeek profile image

Greekgeek 4 years ago from California Author

I did get to see the Saturn V exhibit! I went to KSC in 1983 to watch one launch. Very impressive. (I also loved going to the air and space museum in DC, which was closer to me)


mperrottet profile image

mperrottet 4 years ago from Pennsauken, NJ

What a wonderful hub - so interesting hearing your personal relationship with the space program. It's sad to see that era end. You must be very proud that your father was a part of it. Voted up and awesome!


brakel2 profile image

brakel2 4 years ago from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

You are so lucky to have a father involved in space projects. However, the one incident was so sad about kids thinking your father was a murderer. Kids say the craziest things. I hope this gets published soon, so you will have many readers. The article was fascinating to me, as your explanations were clear, and the story well organized. I could almost feel your sense of excitement over the return of the shuttle. You can write about it and think about it the rest of your life. I also like the way you tweet important events. I may do more with the site.


RobertZimmerman profile image

RobertZimmerman 4 years ago from Southeast Florida

That is an interesting take on the program. I grew up in Palm Beach County so we sometimes could see the launches (at least the plume). I also remember where I was when Columbia exploded, I was talking to the General Manager of a new car dealership (I was in banking) when she got a phone call. She told me what happened and we both just sat there as we did not know what to say.


Greekgeek profile image

Greekgeek 4 years ago from California Author

Ouch. I guess one would've needed a strong stomach to live in the age of discovery; it's hard to take the losses along with the triumphs!

I'm trying to decide whether to go up to LA today to watch the odd sight of Endeavor creeping though the streets. They really haven't accomodated crowds.

Anyway, thanks for stopping by!

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