Everyone is a Weed in Someone's Garden

One of the rare blue edible things

Borage or Starflower like many of us started out as a weed and now is a hero for supplying something that benefits all of us
Borage or Starflower like many of us started out as a weed and now is a hero for supplying something that benefits all of us

What is a weed? A plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered. ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

I have always been fascinated by the concept of weeds. Tenacious, frustrating, masters of survival. They have been referred to as "nature's graffiti." Some have been so successful they have earned their own place in horticulture as grass, ornamentals, medicine and sometimes flowers of choice rather than a scourge to be hunted down and eliminated.

I have known people like that. People who don't look like, who don't act like and who don't fit in with the crowd they are in. And yet, in their own right and amongst others who see their worth, they often are the trendsetters, the ones who are quoted and eventually emulated.

But what about the weeds that proliferate so that the plants who were there first can't compete? What about the weeds that are prickly and don't look as pretty as the other plants? If you are a human weed, the difference is you have a choice. As we look at nature's "weeds" we just might learn a thing or two that will make all the difference in how we are perceived and whether or not we will be included or excluded.

He who hunts for flowers will find flowers; and he who loves weeds will find weeds. ~Henry Ward Beecher

Borage, also known as Starflower, originated in Syria and has naturalized all over Europe and the Americas. The seed oil is desired as a source of gamma linoleic acid or GLA, for which borage is the highest known plant-based source. Borage or Starflower is a flower that quite often grows as a weed in home gardens. The flower is one of the rare blue edible things, and tastes very sweet. What we can learn from the Starflower is If you are useful and colorful, even if your pedigree is just starting, others will notice you and start to include you in their events and projects. (Newbie hubbers take note!)

One is tempted to say that the most human plants, after all, are the weeds. ~John Burroughs


May all your weeds be wildflowers. ~Author Unknown

What we call a weed is in fact merely a plant growing where we do not want it. ~E.J. Salisbury

Blow Away Dandelion

One of the most famous weeds is the dandelion. Many a homeowner has struggled with the lowly dandelion plant springing up in their yard--only to find their children plucking the ephereal sphere of helicopter-like seeds and blowing them into the wind to land who knows where amongst their carefully cultivated blades of grass or rows of flowers.

While the dandelion is considered a weed by many gardeners, the plant does have several culinary and medicinal uses. The plant can be eaten cooked or raw in various forms, such as in soup or salad. Usually the young, less bitter leaves are eaten raw in salads while older leaves are cooked. Dandelion blossoms are used to make dandelion wine. Dandelions are high in vitamin A and also are a source of vitamin C. Ground roasted dandelion root is sometimes used as a coffee substitute. Drunk before meals, this is believed to stimulate digestive functions. Unlike other diuretics, dandelion leaves contain good amounts of potassium, a mineral that is often lost during increased urination. There is also evidence that this property of dandelion leaves may normalize blood sugar.

We can learn from the dandelion--so you're a weed, be sweet , you can be sustenance for someone. If you are alone in a barren place, put on a happy face and bloom where you are planted. If you want to promote yourself--make it fun for others to help you.

I learn more about God from weeds than from roses; resilience springing
through the smallest chink of hope in the absolute of concrete....~Phillip Pulfrey


The Corncockle

Weeds are flowers too, once you get to know them. ~A.A. Milne

One "weed" which came as an unwelcome tag-along to wheat or corn is a native of Europe where it is simply called "the Corn Cockle". The species is a weed of cereals and other crops, but because it is so attractive has become a flower of choice by many for their gardens.

The name "corn cockle" comes from its appearance in the corn fields of England, where it has been unwelcome for years. However, its 3- to 4-foot height with rosy pink to fuchsia flowers rippling in the wind make it a welcome addition to the garden, where it will bloom from June on.

What we can learn from the Corn Cockle is that even if you look good and seem useful (the seeds were early used to treat all sorts of ailments including cancer but now found to be toxic) if you are harmful or crowd out the more nutritious plants, you will be shunned. If, however, you stick to what you do best--in this case a pretty flower, you will be adored and included.

Pretty is As Pretty Does

The Evening Primrose (Hey I'd welcome this weed in my garden anytime.)
The Evening Primrose (Hey I'd welcome this weed in my garden anytime.)

The King's Cure-All

Evening primrose is a wildflower that grows throughout the U.S., and has served as food and medicine throughout history, often for upset stomach and respiratory infections. The oil is found in the plant's seeds and is high in the essential fatty acid gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). Native Americans ate the boiled, nutty-flavored root, and used leaf poultices from the plant for bruises and hemorrhoids. In the 17th century, European settlers took the root back to England and Germany, where it was introduced as food and became a popular folk remedy, earning the name king's cure-all. The plant was also a Shaker medicine, sold commercially. In the wild, evening-primrose acts as a primary colonizer, quickly appearing wherever a patch of bare, undisturbed ground may be found. This means that it tends to be found in poorer environments such as dunes, roadsides, railway embankments and wastelands where it eventually is out-competed by other species.

What we can learn from the Evening Primrose is that if our talents are not as stellar as others, we must make every opportunity count. If we are able to soothe hurts of others, we will be valued and protected and if we contribute what others really need we will be treated royally.

A Stranger is a Weed Until We Make them a Friend

A weed is a friend we haven't met yet

A door we haven't opened

A course we haven't charted

A letter we haven't read

A speech we've never heard

A melody never played

A habit we haven't formed

A stranger is a weed until we make them a friend

©Winsome Publishing 2010

A recent hub highlights a perfect day:  It Was One of Those Surprise Days

Comments 74 comments

sheila b. profile image

sheila b. 6 years ago

So much on many levels here. I really enjoyed all you wrote.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Thank you Sheila. I "weedy weedy" appreciate it. =:)


loriamoore 6 years ago

I really enjoyed your hub.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

I'm so glad you enjoyed it Loria. Thank you for stopping by the weed patch. =:)


katiem2 profile image

katiem2 6 years ago from I'm outta here

Winsome, I too have marveled over weeds. I'm amazed at how hard we try to kill them and all the while they are so strong and independent while the plants we nurse, pamper and baby are weaklings compared to WEEDS. We kill the strong and baby the weak. hummm... This is a great hub. I love it! A BIG FAT RATE UP and Must Read! Peace :)


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca

E.J.Salisbury is so right! You've put this hub together with grace and style, Winsome. I think I'll pick you and put you in my very favorite vase. Okay?


thevoice profile image

thevoice 6 years ago from carthage ill

great hub reading learning hub thanks


lalesu profile image

lalesu 6 years ago from south of the Mason-Dixon

A friend recently likened me to kudzu, a most tanacious weed, and I took it as a great compliment. This is a wonderful perspective on the "eye of the beholder." Thank you!


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Katie, thank you for your comment--maybe we can take a lesson from what you say--when you smother and baby something it may wither, but let it seek it's own way and watch it thrive. =:)

Lorlie you are such a sweetheart. I would thrive in your favorite vase--(I do however require lots of chocolate.) =:) I'm writing this in my fave chocolate cafe Leonidas in old town Pasadena. Did you know they melt milk and dark fine Belgian chocolates down with milk for their hot chocolate--yummmmm!

The Voice, I have enjoyed you fine comments in my journeys on hubpages, so glad to see you stop by. Thank you for your kind words.

Laura, I'm sure they meant that in the nicest way--you are a survivor, but I would have picked one like the Starflower that is beautiful as well. Thanks for the gracious comment.


lalesu profile image

lalesu 6 years ago from south of the Mason-Dixon

Oh, yes, in fact, he imbued kudzu with so much charm it will forevermore bring a smile to my face wherever I encounter it...and now the the starflower, as well!


JBeadle profile image

JBeadle 6 years ago from Midwest

Great hub idea. Loved it. Loved linking in those human traits with actual weeds and matching human behavior to the plants. I personally feel my grass is a weed that is hindering my "creeping charlie" (a weed with pretty purple flowers). If I'm not mistaken. Grass ITSELF is a weed already. Isn't it?


Micky Dee profile image

Micky Dee 6 years ago

I'm a lot like poison ivy. I make people break out into all kinds of crap. Some say I've made them itch too.


i scribble profile image

i scribble 6 years ago

Nice job. Love the metaphor of weeds as people. I've noticed that many of history's most revered were quite weed-like. Franklin, Einstein, and Van Gogh all abandoned their families, including children. But maybe this is a misappropriation of your concept of weed, an insult to weeds everywhere?


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Hey John, you made me smile there. That's the whole point of the article--sometimes, what we think is an intruder is more welcome than the one we thought belonged.

You picked a great example, while most people think of it as a weed because of its propensity for spreading, Creeping Charlie was a veritable medicine chest for early settlers. Europeans brought it to America because it functioned like hops to improve and clarify beer, hence the name Alehoof. When you had a cold or were congested, neighbors would make a tea that was high in Vitamin C and give it to you for anti-inflammation, congestion and mucous control. It was said to relieve tinnitus or ringing in the ears and even helped as a diuretic to remove lead from your system.

It's a member of the mint family so that when you mow it along with your grass, it has a wonderful (I'm told) aroma making the chore almost pleasurable. Since it can restart from bits of root, you either have to welcome it as a part of your landscape family or completely kill everything and start over. Like pushy cousins or aunts or uncles, you just have to live with em cause you can't kill em. =:) Thanks for the great comment.

Micky, when I read your hubs I break out into prose or singing and immediately get the itch to grab my bike and hit the hills. You can be a weed in my garden anytime. =:)


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Hello I Scribble. Love your name by the way. You are absolutely correct about the ones you mentioned. Franklin was like Creeping Charlie, he had so many uses and talents that he was imported to Europe on America's behalf and wound up cropping up everywhere in society. Lucky for us he became a charming, indispensable part of our country's heritage.

Van Gogh was a lot like the Corn Cockle--he was almost toxic in his social skills, but oh could he create beauty.

Thank you for your comment.


i scribble profile image

i scribble 6 years ago

I forgot to mention that I love the quotes you included. May have to borrow some of them sometime. What was your source(s) for this hub?


Stan Fletcher profile image

Stan Fletcher 6 years ago from Nashville, TN

I love your perspective and am a little upset I didn't think of it myself. Rated up!


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Thanks I S. I would like to cite several Library of Congress tomes and several Los Angeles Library reference monsters, but alas I relied on search engines including the one hooked to my brain. =:) Oh and Einstein was a weed that led to a small but deadly infestation of radioactive mushrooms.

Stan, I waited and waited, but I just had to go ahead. The weeds of inspiration were growing out my ears and would have escaped had I not nailed them down to a hub. The word is that no one can keep them from proliferating all over the place. They should be infiltrating your Hair Ignition hub any minute now. Good news though, I understand a lot of them, especially that Creep Charlie is good at getting the lead out. =:)


faithfulpen 6 years ago

Wow, thanks Winsome for sharing my poem through your link! Really appreciate it, and this hub!!!!!


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 6 years ago from United States

This is an excellent hub. I love the comparison listing the attributes of weeds to personalities. You wrote this hub beautifully with grace.


Ivorwen profile image

Ivorwen 6 years ago from Hither and Yonder

A few years ago my county had a Woad round up. They paid kids $5 for every grocery sack full they gathered and brought in. Evidently, it was very successful, because I can't find it anywhere. Now I will have to plant it in my garden and make sure it doesn't go to seed.

The funny thing about all this is, they want to make sure that non-native plants don't take over the area, but nearly every 'native' plant here came from Europe.

Weeds, transplanted people, and the undiscovered are what make life interesting.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Faithfulpen, the pleasure is all mine.

Pamela thank you, Juliet knew a Montague was a weed but her Romeo was a rose and so "by any other name.." she kept him in her garden.

Ivorwen, isn't it the truth--people move from one place to another (like transplanted "weeds" from LA living in Seattle) and then try to keep others like themselves from coming there because they want to keep "outsiders" out. John Burroughs got it right when he said the most "human" plants are the weeds.

I'm beginning to think that we would be a lot better off if we could find more ways to enjoy our differences than finding ways to make us all alike. =:)


Granny's House profile image

Granny's House 6 years ago from Older and Hopefully Wiser Time

I am going out this morning to pick the dandelions to make wine for a friend. Great read. Thank you.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

For reals? How wonderful. I'm glad there is someone out there who lives what we write. Way to go!...and thanks for stopping by.


Cathi Sutton profile image

Cathi Sutton 6 years ago

I completely LOVE this Hub! The comparisions you made between human traits and weeds are wonderful! Very thoughtfully written with beautiful examples! I loved the photos too! Thanks so much for not only entertaining me, but for making me think too!


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Cathi, you are a bright smile on my face. Thank you for your kind words. The more I learn about weeds the more I pay attention to the friends I haven't made yet and look for more to like in the ones I already have. =:)


lightning john profile image

lightning john 6 years ago from Florida

Thank you very much Winsome! Compared to you, my writing is very seedy! I am now a new fan!


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Lol, thank you John, seeds grow into marvelous things. I will be visiting your garden soon.


drbj profile image

drbj 6 years ago from south Florida

What an interesting as well as informative take on weeds? Thanks, Winsome, for your literary inspiration. Weed all benefit from it.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Hey what would Happy Days be without the Fonz? Seinfeld without Kramer? Hubpages without you and me? Just kidding. Thanks for the kind words. =:)


Lgali profile image

Lgali 6 years ago

thanks for sharing nice ideas


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

You are so welcome Lgali. Thank you for stopping by.


fastfreta profile image

fastfreta 6 years ago from Southern California

I love the variation of this hub. The way you intertwined your philosophical explanation with the definition of weeds was genus. And the quotes added the extra nuance. Great hub. I'll be back.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Thank you so much Freta. Using practical applications for philosophical truths goes way back to writers like Aesop and we all know how effective parables are. "Consider the lilies of the field..." I figure if it's good enough for The Carpenter, it's good enough for me. =:)


Betty Reid profile image

Betty Reid 6 years ago from Texas

This is a great hub for wildflower season. I like your quote about weeds as an example of resilience.


Sandyspider profile image

Sandyspider 6 years ago from Wisconsin, USA

I'm a weed and proud of it. I happen to like some of the flowers people call weeds.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Yes Sandy, I am a proud weed too. Maybe we could have our own association--Wonderful Eclectics Enjoying Diversity. =:)Thanks for visiting.


mysterylady 89 profile image

mysterylady 89 6 years ago from Florida

I read this quite some time ago. It was one of the hubs that inspired me to join. I appreciate your use of a "controlling metaphor" --weeds are like people. When I waa a child, I used to pick dandelions for dandelion greens, which I hated. I also always loved to blow the seeds into the breeze.


Neil Sperling profile image

Neil Sperling 6 years ago from Port Dover Ontario Canada

Great slant - people compared to weeds! So true the weeds are only a weed when they are where we do not want them, same as some people would be better suited in other vocations and or relationships. In the right place all weeds (people) are beautiful plants (wonderful friends/souls).

Trouble is, ( or should I say beauty is) "the toe bone is connected to the foot bone" same as those darn weeds are connected to every garden I ever planted.

Ain't life just Dandy Ly'n round - no doubt planning your next great mint to pepper us with. As the wind blows and the sun flowers unfolding the next morning glory, no doubt you will tumble, weed out some good quotes and deliver us another star flower hub.

Love - Light - Laughter

Neil


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Mystery Lady, how did I know you were one of those whimsical people who fell under the humble dandelion's spell...thank you for your kind words. =:)


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Lol, "tumble, weed" I get it. Thanks Neil. I'm going to spend some time visiting other weed patches now that my "motivation" research project is over. =:)


alahiker28 profile image

alahiker28 6 years ago from the Deep South

Nice hub, Winsome. I especially like the quote: "He who hunts for flowers will find flowers; and he who loves weeds will find weeds." by Beecher. I have met a person like this. Thank you for reminding us to look for the good in people.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

You are so welcome Alahiker, there is an expression of "weeding out" those you don't like, but I'm finding that a lot of my favorites are in fact--weeds. Thank you for your comment. =:)


Sally's Trove profile image

Sally's Trove 6 years ago from Southeastern Pennsylvania

I very much enjoyed this Hub and the thoughtful and interesting comments, too.

As I read, I couldn't help but think of a few weeds in my life right now, notably the invasive Canada thistle that I've been waging war with in my garden for going on three years. It is the object of my deepest, darkest, destructive desires. So, after reading your delightful metaphors, I went on a hunt for any benefit this scourge might have.

On a search for "benefits of Canada thistle", the most popular item returned looked like this or something close: "benefits of Canada thistle suppression." "Kill Canada thistle" was my favorite.

I don't want to think about what kinds of people may be like these weeds.

Up and awesome!


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Sally, thank you for your gracious comment and for the example. Your nemesis is one of five named as an "injurious weed" in the UK Weeds Act of 1959 and lax private citizens can be fined up to 1000 pounds and "other punishment"--although one would think that the weed itself is punishment enough. This plant not only survives by its extensive deep root system, but actually puts out a biocide to prevent other plants from growing.

On the bright side, Cirsium arvense or Canada thistle or Cursed thistle--I had to laugh at that one--is cursed for it's resiliency and survivability--traits praised in humans. Global warming people would love this thing--It is a C3 carbon fixation plant that uses enormous amounts of carbon dioxide and pulls water up from deep in the soil, releasing 97% through the leaves, cooling itself and its surroundings. The seeds are a major food for the Goldfinch and 20 species of butterflies and moths and the taproot is considered a delicacy in Scotland. The blossoms are pretty orbs of purple.

This plant is like some politicians who are feared for their deep and tenacious connections and for their ability to destroy their competition and while they may do some good their destructive and prickly nature causes much rejoicing when they are finally gone.

The brightest biological hope for Canada is a fruit fly named Orellia and a rust mite that won Picture of the Year. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rust_Mite,_...

Thank you Sally for your contribution to the Weed/people gallery.


trish1048 profile image

trish1048 6 years ago

Hi Winsome,

Lovely hub with lovely photos. Not to mention, very educational.

I remember as a kid being fascinated with milkweed. If my memory serves me correctly, I'd squeeze the milky substance out and use it like a lotion. I don't think it helped :)

My late grandmother, a very proper lady, did a rather naughty thing. I was 17 and going on my class trip to Washington D.C. She handed me a bubble bath bottle to take with me. I thought, how sweet. She then told me be careful with it and to keep it hidden. When I asked why, she said with a smile, it's my homemade dandelion wine. I was flabbergasted. She had gone ahead and boiled the bubblebath bottle so she could use it, and, if it were spotted on my trip, noone would have been the wiser. Crafty woman!

After that experience, I made sure to pick all the dandelions I could find :)


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Ha ha, another great story Trish, your grandmother sounds like a fun lady. It's a humorous vision to think of this very proper lady with her contraband homemade dandelion wine. Very funny. =:)


trish1048 profile image

trish1048 6 years ago

Yes, she was a wonderful woman. Sadly, I lost her just before I turned 18. My grandfather died 5 years later. I spent the better part of my childhood spending weekends at their house. It was my favorite place to be :)


DzyMsLizzy profile image

DzyMsLizzy 6 years ago from Oakley, CA

Great hub--very interesting with awesome quotes. Interesting side-note to the Dandelion: its name is a corruption/mispronunciation of its French name, "Dent de Lion," (correctly pronounced, "Don duh leeyon") or "Lion's Teeth," so named because of the sharp points of its flower. It is easy to see how the transmutation happened from French to English. You mention it as a diuretic--also an ancient bit of knowledge. Going again, back to the French, a common, or vulgar name of the plant is "pis en lit," translated as 'wet the bed.' (or less politely and more accurately, "piss in the bed.")

Thanks for stopping by my hub and leaving a comment. I'll be following you now. ;-)


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Great to have you DML, thank you for the lovely addition to the weedlore. Those French called it like it was didn't they. Vive le pis en lit. =:)


Shadesbreath profile image

Shadesbreath 6 years ago from California

Mysterylady read my weed hub (Plant Racism lol) and mentioned she had a hub about you and your weed hub, which I read, and then came here to read the subject of her hub to find that it was just as delightful as she said it was. First, I'm pretty happy to be in the company of such weedy writers as Emerson (a personal favorite), Beecher and Milne, not to mention yourself. Second, I love the optimism and kindness that fills this piece. A little window into who you really are, I bet. :)


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Shadesbreath thank you so much for your gracious and insightful words. Can't wait to read your Plant Racism hub...and yes this weed is trying to be a little kinder and optimistic instead of trying to take over the garden. Live and let live is a good motto for a reformed weed. =:)


maggs224 profile image

maggs224 6 years ago from Sunny Spain

As usual a very interesting hub I love weeds and I loved this hub and I am so happy that you have identified some of the weeds that I encounter when taking my dog for a walk.

Photography is one of my passions; I love taking photographs especially macros. I have found that often something that you wouldn’t give a first glance to when looked at close up actually can turn out to be amazing.

I find people are like that too, when we take the time to look properly most people turn out to be really interesting and to have all sorts of qualities and experiences that you will not see if you just skim the surface of their lives. I look on people as God’s gift to us and all we have to do is to look closely in order to find out what treasure he has stored in them for our enjoyment. I have yet to be disappointed. Thumbs up!!


maggs224 profile image

maggs224 6 years ago from Sunny Spain

I forgot to say I loved the photos and and thought that your poem A Stranger is a Weed at the end was wonderful.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

And what a macro delight you are. The closer I get to you Maggs the more I find to enjoy. Thank you for a great addition to the weed metaphor. I had written the words--A Stranger is a friend you haven't met yet some time ago and when I wrote this hub, I knew why I had written it. That became the basis for the poem and (I thought) a fitting ending to the piece. Thank you again for your great comment.


2uesday profile image

2uesday 6 years ago from - on the web, I am 2uesday.

Not what I expected from the title - I enjoyed reading it and the line of thought it followed. Thank you, and for the photo of the corncockle I have a photo of one that grew in the garden, but could not remember its name - mystery solved. BTW I never thought of it as a weed such a pretty flower.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Hi 2uesday, I am so glad you are not a weed bigot..ha ha..I love the blossoms of all the "weeds" in the article. I think if I told people I was a weed advocate they might get the wrong idea but like Juliet said (sort of): "A flower by any other name..." Thank you for the visit 2uze. =:)


Storytellersrus profile image

Storytellersrus 6 years ago from Stepping past clutter

I have a rule for my yard; only pull spurge and other noxious weeds that threaten to take over and push the rest out. I love all my flowering weeds! Thanks for an inspirational hub- love all the quotes and especially Milne.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Hey Storyteller, you sound like my kind of gardener. Some plants we plant and some just come and adopt us. I'm like you, if they play nice they can stay. Thank you for the kind words. =:)


Morgan F profile image

Morgan F 6 years ago from USA

Hey Winsome great hub! Informative and a good analogy at the same time.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Hey Morgan, you must be exhausted from running all over HP getting acquainted with the challenge folk. Thank you so much for taking the time to visit my weed patch. =:)


Gerg profile image

Gerg 6 years ago from California

Love the analogies - very creative, Winsome ...


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Thanks Gerg, it ain't easy being weed what with all the weed killers out there, but we seem to thrive anyway. Cantankerous and unique and just maybe the best thing that ever happened to a garden. Appreciate the kind words. =:)


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa

Plants are wonderful and you've created a wonderful one here! Thanks for all the ideas - and I'm grateful to Mysterylady for her Hub about this Hub - two great Hubs to read together.

Love and peace

Tony


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Good to see you Tony, I'm glad you enjoyed both the garden and metaphor. I've learned a lot about weeds and gained a greater appreciation than I already had. Scientists look to the rain forest for new discoveries but sometimes the best ones occur in our very own gardens. Thank you for gracing mine. =:)


Charlise profile image

Charlise 5 years ago from All Over the Place!

Very, very sweet and cute. I love the moral of the story ;-)


Winsome profile image

Winsome 5 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Thank you Charlise, you are sweet to say so. The moral is one of my favorites--especially today. We all need each other and those who can see the good points of people are the ones who benefit the most. =:)


Jewels profile image

Jewels 5 years ago from Australia

This hub is full of gems Winsome. The poem at the end is wonderful and I'll have to bookmark this in case I ever want to quote you.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 5 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

What a nice and appropriate thing for a "Jewels" to say. I've always said that I'd like to live a life that would be quoted. It's comforting to know my little "weed words" will be welcomed in the gardens of HP'ers like you. =:)


Derdriu 4 years ago

Winsome, What a charming, endearing, gallant summary of the life and times of four colorful, useful weeds! In particular, I like your starting out with starflower, which is one of my favorites precisely for the reasons that you mention: blue color and sweet taste. Additionally, I like your bringing in the dandelion which brings so much joy into children's lives (and so much aggravation into modern yards).

Thank you for sharing, voted up + all.

Respectfully, Derdriu


Winsome profile image

Winsome 4 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Aww you like weeds too. I'm glad. I thought I was the only one who was for the underdog. I think it's not so much rooting (ha ha) for the underdog, but trying to see something useful and beautiful in everyone--and plants.

Thank you for the wonderful comment. So nice to meet you. =:)


Stuff 2 years ago

Loverly


Winsome 2 years ago

Quite dandy-lion :)


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chara.earth 12 days ago from Saint Laurant de Cerdans, Pyrénees Orientales, France

Hi Winsome, what a lovely hub. I too am a weed lover and followed the related hub links to your article from my hub on ecological weeding. I even grow dandelions in pots to have easy greens on hand. Thank you for the great read. Be well. Fiona

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