Freedom's Sisters, Twenty Great African American Women

Freedom's Sisters A Museum Exhibition

On March 15, 2008 a three year traveling museum exhibition made its debut at the Cincinnati Museum spotlighting twenty African American women who have fought for equality for all Americans called, Freedom’s Sisters. The display itself is a collaboration effort between the Cincinnati Museum Center, Ford Motor Company and the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES).

These are women pioneers, making the world a better place because of the path they have forged.

Freedom's Sisters Is A Teaching Venue

 

Quoting one of the honorees, Septima Poinsette Clark (1898-1987), “The greatest evil in our country today is not racism, but ignorance.”

 

Designed as an educational tool targeting students, Freedom’s Sisters consists of historical simulations and interactive displays designed to drive home the messages and meanings of each of the twenty different women who are being honored.

The Freedom’s Sisters displays are organized around four themes – “Dare to Dream,” “Inspire Lives” “Serve the Public” and “Look to the Future.”

 

 

Freedom's Sisters Making a Difference

Ella J. Baker- Freedom's Sister

Ella Baker, official of the Southern Conference Educational Fund, speaks at the Jeannette Rankin news conference on Jan. 3, 1968. (AP Photo)
Ella Baker, official of the Southern Conference Educational Fund, speaks at the Jeannette Rankin news conference on Jan. 3, 1968. (AP Photo)

Freedom's Sister- Ella J. Baker (1903-1986)

Beginning her work with civil rights in 1931, Ella J. Baker joined the Young Negroes Cooperative League and was soon appointed its national director.

During the 1940’s she became the field secretary to the National Association for the Advancement of Coloured People (NAACP), commanding a leading role in the desegregation of New York City public schools.

In 1956 she helped establish an organization called Friendship, and helped to fight against Jim Crow Laws in the Deep South.

Influential in the civil rights movement during the 1960s, Ella became involved with a student sit-in which was held at the local Woolworth’s store in Greensboro, North Carolina. The restaurant in the store had a policy that refused to seat black people, and over the course of a few days it became completely occupied by black students, who refused to leave until they were served. Although many times they were physically assaulted they refused to hit back. Baker was influential in establishing the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) who adopted the Gandhian theory of nonviolent direct action.

Constance Baker Motley- Freedom's Sister

Federal Judge Constance Baker Motley, who as a young lawyer represented Martin Luther King Jr. and played a pivotal role in the nation’s civil rights struggle.
Federal Judge Constance Baker Motley, who as a young lawyer represented Martin Luther King Jr. and played a pivotal role in the nation’s civil rights struggle.

Freedom's Sister- Constance Baker Motley (1921-2005)

Graduating from New York University in 1943, Constance Baker Motley started her legal career as a law clerk in the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund (LDF), becoming the first female attorney for that organization.

A key legal strategist involved in the civil rights movement, she was the first African-American woman to ever argue a case before the U.S. Supreme Court, the first to be elected to the New York Senate, and the first ever to be appointed as a federal court judge.

Shirley Chisholm- Freedom's Sister

Member of the League of Women Voters, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), National Board of Americans for Democratic Action, Delta Sigma Theta.
Member of the League of Women Voters, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), National Board of Americans for Democratic Action, Delta Sigma Theta.

Freedom's Sister- Shirley Chisholm (1924-2005)

Shirley Chisholm became the first elected African-American women to have a seat in Congress. As an American politician, educator and author, she joined the Congressional Black Caucus in 1969, and in 1972, made a bid for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination, becoming the first majority party African-American candidate for President of the United States, winning 152 delegates. During her tenure in Congress, she was influential in improving opportunities for inner-city residents, as well as a vocal opponent of the draft.

Mary Church Terrell- Freedom's Sister

Photograph courtesy of the Library of Congress, LC-USZ62-54722
Photograph courtesy of the Library of Congress, LC-USZ62-54722

Freedom's Sister- Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954)

An offspring of former slaves, Mary Church Terrell was not only a civil rights activist but also fought for the rights of women. She was one of the first African-American women to have earned a college degree, which she did from Oberlin College. She received her Masters from there also.

She was a teacher and a principle, who was later appointed to the District of Columbia Board of Education, the first black women in the United States to hold such a position. She was one of the founding members of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

Septima Poinsette Clark- Freedom's Sister

"I believe unconditionally in the ability of people to respond when they are told the truth. We need to be taught to study rather than to believe, to inquire rather than to affirm." Septima Poinsette Clark
"I believe unconditionally in the ability of people to respond when they are told the truth. We need to be taught to study rather than to believe, to inquire rather than to affirm." Septima Poinsette Clark

Freedom's Sister- Septima Poinsette Clark (1898-1987)

Passionately opposed to segregation in the school system, Septima Poinsette Clark worked unceasingly for equal access to education for African- Americans. Being a leader in the civil rights movement decades before its rise to national awareness, she became known as “Queen mother” or “Grandmother of the American Civil Rights Movement.”

"Her courageous and pioneering efforts in the area of citizenship education and interracial cooperation" won her Southern Christian Leadership Conference’s (SCLC) highest award, the Drum Major for Justice Award.

Kathleen Cleaver- Freedom's Sister

Kathleen Cleaver speaking at Black Panther Rally - 1969
Kathleen Cleaver speaking at Black Panther Rally - 1969

Freedom's Sisters- Kathleen Cleaver (1945- )

Mostly known as the wife of Eldridge Cleaver of the Black Panther Party, Kathleen Cleaver is an accomplished lawyer and teacher of law as well as a civil rights activist.

She was the communications secretary and the first female member of the Party’s decision making body. In this position she served as the Party’s spokesperson and press secretary, giving speeches all over the country. Kathleen was influential in organizing the national campaign to free the Party’s minister of defense, Huey Newton, and ran unsuccessfully on the Peace and Freedom Party ticket for the California state assembly.

Myrlie Evers-Williams- Freedom's Sister

Evers-Williams has fought to carry on the legacy of her husband, murdered civil rights activist Medgar Evers. She has become a symbol of courage and perseverance, steadfast in her march towards social justice.
Evers-Williams has fought to carry on the legacy of her husband, murdered civil rights activist Medgar Evers. She has become a symbol of courage and perseverance, steadfast in her march towards social justice.

Freedom's Sisters- Myrlie Evers-Williams (1963- )

Myrlie Evers-Williams is probably best known as the wife of Medgar Evers, the Mississippi state field secretary for the NAACP who was shot in the driveway of his own home in 1963. She unceasingly appealed for justice concerning the murder of her husband, but after two all-white juries deadlocked he was set free. Years later she still continued in her quest until in 1994, the 73-year old man was sentenced to life in prison.

Active in the Civil Rights movement she was the first black woman to be named to the five-member Board of Public Works by Mayor Tom Bradley of Los Angeles.

Fannie Lou Hamer- Freedom's Sister

 Fannie Lou Hamer joined  the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SYNC) and worked as a field worker  on the voter registration committee. The committee worked on preparing blacks to read and write so they could register to vote.
Fannie Lou Hamer joined the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SYNC) and worked as a field worker on the voter registration committee. The committee worked on preparing blacks to read and write so they could register to vote.

Freedom's Sisters- Fannie Lou Hamer (1917-1977)

Instrumental in the fight for American voting rights, Fannie Lou Hamer was known for her Biblical beliefs in righteousness and the manner in which she expressed them to others.

She became the Vice-Chair of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, and was known as an electrifying speaker.

Dorothy Height- Freedom's Sister

A Civil Rights pioneer who is still marching on in Washington.
A Civil Rights pioneer who is still marching on in Washington.

Freedom's Sisters- Dorothy Height (1912- )

Recipient of the Congressional Gold Medal, Dorothy Height began her civil rights career as a caseworker with the New York City Welfare Department. From there she joined the National Council of Negro Women where she fought for equal rights of both African Americans and women, and ultimately became president of that organization.

She is known for her work in the organization of “Wednesdays in Mississippi” a group which brought together both black and white women form the North and the South in dialog of understanding.

She has served on several presidential committees, and currently serves as the Chairperson of the Executive Committee of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, the largest civil rights organization in the United States.

Dorothy Height- Freedom Pioneer

Charlayne Hunter-Gault- Freedom's Sister

Distinguished journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault is the CNN African bureau chief and the winner of many news awards including the Peabody Award, the highest honor given in broadcast journalism.
Distinguished journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault is the CNN African bureau chief and the winner of many news awards including the Peabody Award, the highest honor given in broadcast journalism.

Freedom's Sisters- Charlayne Hunter-Gault (1942- )

Acclaimed journalist and civil rights activist, Charlayne Hunter- Gault has won numerous awards in her field of expertise. Currently serving as a foreign correspondent with National Public Radio, she was the chief national correspondent for PBS and the first African American reporter for The New Yorker as an investigative reporter.

She was also one of the first African Americans to attend the University of Georgia in 1961 putting an end to racial segregation at the university.

Charlayne Hunter-Gault

Barbara Jordan- Freedom's Sister

Judiciary Committee member Barbara Jordan of Texas was just a beginner when the House started the Nixon impeachment proceedings.
Judiciary Committee member Barbara Jordan of Texas was just a beginner when the House started the Nixon impeachment proceedings.

Freedom's Sisters- Barbara Jordan (1936-1996)

Congresswoman in the Untied States House of Representatives, Barbara Jordan was an American politician who, being from Texas, became the first black woman from a southern state to serve in the House. A successful attorney and politician, she was influential in supporting the impeachment of President Richard Nixon.

Among her many awards an honors she received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1994.

She is buried in the Texas State Cemetery and was the first black woman to be interred there. The Austin-Bergstrom International Airport has named the main terminal in her honor.

Mary McLeod Bethune- Freedom's Sister

Equal parts educator, politician, and social visionary, Mary McLeod Bethune was one of the most prominent African American women of the first half of the twentieth century--and one of the most powerful.
Equal parts educator, politician, and social visionary, Mary McLeod Bethune was one of the most prominent African American women of the first half of the twentieth century--and one of the most powerful.

Freedom's Sisters- Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955)

Mary McLeod Bethune was an educator and civil rights leader, who started a school for black students in Daytona Beach, Florida that eventually has become the Bethune-Cookman University.

Founder of the National Council of Negro Women in New York City, she brought together 28 different organizations that worked to improve the quality of life for women and their communities.

She was a close loyal friend to both Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt. Her house is a National Historic Site in Washington, D.C. and her home in Daytona Beach, Florida is a National Historic Landmark.

Rosa Parks- Freedom's Sister

 Civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks was photographed by Alabama cops following her February 1956 arrest during the Montgomery bus boycotts. The booking photo, taken when Parks was 43, was discovered in July 2004 by a deputy cleaning out the court house.
Civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks was photographed by Alabama cops following her February 1956 arrest during the Montgomery bus boycotts. The booking photo, taken when Parks was 43, was discovered in July 2004 by a deputy cleaning out the courthouse.

Freedom's Sisters- Rosa Parks (1913-2005)

Known as the “Mother of the Modern-Day Civil Rights Movement”, Rosa Parks has become widely known for her refusal to give up her seat on a bus to make room for a white person. This action led to one of the largest movements against racial segregation in the United States. Renowned activist and speaker, her legacy is known worldwide.

Sonia Sanchez- Freedom's Sister

Sanchez began publishing her poems in the early 1960s in journals such as the Liberator and the Journal of Black Poetry. Her first book, Homecoming, was published in 1969. In addition to her poetry, Sanchez has published three books for children.
Sanchez began publishing her poems in the early 1960s in journals such as the Liberator and the Journal of Black Poetry. Her first book, Homecoming, was published in 1969. In addition to her poetry, Sanchez has published three books for children.

Freedom's Sisters- Sonia Sanchez (1934- )

Famous poet and author, Wilsonia Benita Driver Sanchez is a major part of the Black Arts Movement. She has been a professor at eight universities and has lectured at over 500 college campuses across the United States.

As an activist for the people she was a member of CORE (Congress for Racial Equality). Her work of art concentrating on the struggles of Black American have gained her notoriety and respect among the world. Among her numerous awards she has received is the Peace and Freedom Award from the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom.

Coretta Scott King- Freedom's Sister

The strong women behind a strong man, Coretta Scott King.
The strong women behind a strong man, Coretta Scott King.

Coretta Scott King

Freedom's Sisters- Coretta Scott King (1927-2006)

Wife of civil rights activist Martin Luther King, Jr., Coretta Scott King worked side by side in support of this cause. She was influential in the creation of the federal holiday commemorating the birth of her husband in 1986.

Opposed to apartheid she has participated in a series of sit-in protests in Washington, D.C. and traveled to South Africa to meet with Winnie Mandela while her husband, Nelson Mandela was imprisoned.

As one of the founders of The Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy, she was a strong advocate for world peace. When she died over 14,000 people were in attendance at her funeral.

Betty Shabazz- Freedom's Sister

After her husband's death, Shabazz returned to school, eventually earning a doctorate in education from the University of Massachusetts in 1975.
After her husband's death, Shabazz returned to school, eventually earning a doctorate in education from the University of Massachusetts in 1975.

Freedom's Sisters- Betty Shabazz (1936-1997)

Wife of the Nation of Islam leader Malcolm X, Betty Shabazz was known as “Betty X”, the X representing the African family name she would never know.

As a leader in that community she experienced pain and heartache as she watched the assassination of her husband in 1965. Betty was a registered nurse and was determined to provide for her family of six daughters, being a role model for them in this trying time.

In 1976 she started to work at New York’s Medgar Ever College as an assistant professor, and soon became the head of public relations at the school. She traveled extensively, speaking about civil rights and racial tolerance.

An influential icon in the Islamic community “She never stopped giving and she never became cynical.” She was the epitome of hope and healing.

Harriet Tubman- Freedom's Sister

Former slave who helped lead the Underground Railroad.
Former slave who helped lead the Underground Railroad.

Harriet Tubman A True Pioneer Woman

Freedom's Sisters- Harriet Tubman (1820-1913)

Harriet Tubman known as the “Moses of her people” led hundreds of slaves to freedom though a network of safe houses known as the Underground Railroad.

She later became a great leader in the abolitionist movement as well as an active participant in the Civil War, where she became a spy for the federal forces in South Carolina. She also worked as a nurse and a cook for the Union army.

Active in the women’s suffrage movement as well, she became a symbol of courage and freedom.

C. Delores Tucker- Freedom's Sister

A voice crying out in the wilderness when she denounced rap lyrics as "pornographic filth" and "demeaning and offensive to black women."
A voice crying out in the wilderness when she denounced rap lyrics as "pornographic filth" and "demeaning and offensive to black women."

Freedom's Sisters- C. Delores Tucker (1927-2005)

Marching with Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and raising funds for the NAACP are just two of the magnificent contributions that Delores Tucker participated in.

Selected as one of 25 of the World’s Most Intriguing People from People magazine, she was most famous for her stance against explicit lyrics from rap and hip-hop. Often taking the brunt of her stance in songs by artists like Eminem and Jay-Z, she undauntedly took them on unwavering in her quest.

She also served on the Advisory Board of the Parents Television Council until her death in 2005.

Frances Ellen Watkins Harper- Freedom's Sister

 Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, a poet and activist whose admirers called her "The Bronze Muse."
Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, a poet and activist whose admirers called her "The Bronze Muse."

Freedom's Sisters- Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (1825-1911)

Holding the honor of being the first published African American author, Frances Harper was a writer, lecturer and political activist who lived years ahead of her time.

Not only did she participate in the Underground Railroad, she was influential in preaching education to the recently freed slaves after the war ended.

A firm believer in women’s rights, she was actively involved with the suffrage movement, and also supported the issue of temperance.

Ida B. Wells- Freedom's Sister

Ida B.Wells "stands apart as the most recognizable and effective antilynching crusader in history."
Ida B.Wells "stands apart as the most recognizable and effective antilynching crusader in history."

Freedom's Sisters- Ida B. Wells (1862-1931)

A fearless woman, and civil rights activist, who documented hundreds of atrocities and lynching’s, Ida B. Wells was best known for her active role in the Woman Suffrage Movement.

A forerunner to Rosa Parks she refused to give up her seat on the train and move to the “Jim Crow” car which was already full. After being pulled from the train by two white men, she later sued the railroad. Her case won in the local circuit court but lost in the appeal to the Supreme Court of Tennessee in 1887. After her refusal to stand in the back of the parades that were held during woman’s suffrage marches, she began to get major media publicity.

As playwright Tazewell Thompson sums her up,"...A woman born in slavery, she would grow to become one of the great pioneer activists of the Civil Rights movement. A precursor of Rosa Parks, she was a suffragist, newspaper editor and publisher, investigative journalist, co-founder of the NAACP, political candidate, mother, wife, and the single most powerful leader in the anti-lynching campaign in America. A dynamic, controversial, temperamental, uncompromising race woman, she broke bread and crossed swords with some of the movers and shakers of her time: Frederick Douglass, Susan B. Anthony, Marcus Garvey, Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Francis Willard, and President McKinley. By any fair assessment, she was a seminal figure in Post-Reconstruction America."

Freedom's Sisters Are Pioneers!

Quoting the Smithsonian Institute itself:

"Much of our national memory of the civil rights movement is embodied by male figureheads whose visibility in boycotts, legal proceedings, and mass demonstrations dominated newspaper and television coverage in the 1950s and ’60s. Missing from that picture is a group of extraordinary women who, while less prominent in the media, shaped much of the spirit and substance of civil rights in America, just as their mothers and grandmothers had done for decades."

These are women pioneers who walked paths that had not been walked before. They were courageous, hopeful and had charity in their hearts as they fought to make things better for future generations to come.

Freedom's Sisters Museum Exhibit in Your Area

To find out more about this wonderful exhibit... click here.

If you found this Hub informational... make sure and give it a "Thumbs Up" or Share it with your friends.... Thanks.

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Comments 37 comments

Chef Jeff profile image

Chef Jeff 8 years ago from Universe, Milky Way, Outer Arm, Sol, Earth, Western Hemisphere, North America, Illinois, Chicago.

Excellent hub, Doghouse crew! Some of these Freedom Sisters I have heard of and read about, but some of them are new to me, so I have some new material to research. Thanks again!

I have been a member of a Civil War reenacting group and at times a Harriet Tubman first-person reenactor is at our events. Other times Sojourner Truth shows up to add to the historical nature of the weekend event.

Do you know if this may become a traveling exhibition anytime soon?


In The Doghouse profile image

In The Doghouse 8 years ago from California Author

Chef Jeff,

I too was fascinated by this traveling exhibition of Freedom's Sisters. I had never heard of some of them or didn't realize what they were actually noted for so researching this Hub was fun for me to do.

I believe that this exhibition is staying in Chicago until September and then moving on to Sacramento. If you click on the link in the Hub it will tell you the entire itinerary for the event.

I think I am most fascinated because these women are really an addition to my research on Pioneers... they truly are pioneers in American History.

Thanks for your comments, and the visit!


Write On! profile image

Write On! 8 years ago from United States

Doghouse -

This is a wonderful Hub. Thank you for educating me in regards to these amazing women - who are definitely pioneers in their own right. Each one of these women, referred to as "Freedom Sisters" can be looked to and learned from... in ways that inspire.

Write On!


In The Doghouse profile image

In The Doghouse 8 years ago from California Author

Write On,

I agree completely with your thoughts on these inspirational women. These Freedom's Sisters are pioneers to women all over the world. We can learn from their achievements and successes. I just wish the Freedom's Sister display was more local so that I could go and view it personally.


Marian Swift profile image

Marian Swift 8 years ago from San Francisco Bay Area

Fantastic Hub!

I'm especially delighted to see so many lesser-known names featured in this expedition. (Just wish they were coming out my way ... perhaps they eventually will.)


In The Doghouse profile image

In The Doghouse 8 years ago from California Author

Marian,

Thanks for the comments... I too wish that Freedom's Sisters would be in a closer location for me to attend. I found some of the lesser-know names to be of great interest. These women were certainly examples of courage and faith.


PenmanZee profile image

PenmanZee 8 years ago

Thank you for sharing Doghse. It's amazing what these women accomplished and continue to accomplish in spite of, honestly, being at the bottom of the social pecking order. A very educational and inspiring hub.


Hope Wilbanks profile image

Hope Wilbanks 8 years ago from Louisiana

Fantastic hub!


desert blondie profile image

desert blondie 8 years ago from Palm trees, swimming pools, lots of sand, lots of sunscreen

What a great hub! Between this one and my most recent, Women's Right to Vote Amendment has an August anniversary ... looks like we've got truly great women on our minds these days.

There is a wonderful book "The Patriot's Handbook" by Caroline Kennedy. It contains speeches and assorted moments of great citizenry throughout our USA history. One of the selections is Barbara Jordan's speech on the House Floor in Washington DC when the Nixon Impeachment proceedings began. It is quite a moving statement of patriotism, justice, duty...as valid today as 30 years ago.

Again, GREAT HUB!


In The Doghouse profile image

In The Doghouse 8 years ago from California Author

Penman,

It has been a while since I have heard from you... nice to have you visit again. Yes these women were at the bottom of the pecking order so to speak, being black and a women were two hard things in their time period. Thankfully things are looking up for both. These women impressed me because they knew in their hearts what was right, and they had the courage to act. This pioneer attitude and quality has certainly made a difference for others. These are real modern day heroes to me.


In The Doghouse profile image

In The Doghouse 8 years ago from California Author

@Hope Wilbanks- Thanks for the encouragement. It was a great subject to research.

@Desert Blondie- You and I must be on the same wave length with the power of women in our country. I loved your Womens Right To Vote Hub... it was really a great source of information and made me think about taking my voting right for granted. These women had to fight for every right they could get. It makes it seem more important when you understand the work that went into getting where we are today. Does that make sense? Thanks for the additional information on the book as well.


Rob Jundt profile image

Rob Jundt 8 years ago from Midwest USA

What a great tribute to these women pioneers. Your words have done them justice. Another well written and presented hub. Nice work.


In The Doghouse profile image

In The Doghouse 8 years ago from California Author

Rob,

Thank you for your kind words. These pioneer women are not what one typically thinks of when the word pioneer is used, but I believe that they most certainly qualify to be labeled as such. These are great women who have sacrificed much to profit all.


solarshingles profile image

solarshingles 8 years ago from london

Dear Diana, pleasure to read and to learn about great American history (and freedom). These Freedom's Sisters didn't only change America, they had also influenced many changes worldwide. I love your hubs about Pioneers!


In The Doghouse profile image

In The Doghouse 8 years ago from California Author

Ervin my friend, this one has been a long time coming. I loved learning about these African American women who DID absolutely change the world. You are so right about that! Freedom's Sisters is a great tribute to pioneers everywhere by celebrating the pioneer spirit. Thank you for your kind words, as always.


New Day profile image

New Day 8 years ago from Western United States

In the Doghouse, I came across this Hub almost by accident. What a lovely surprise and great read. It is so great to read about the American pioneers like these women. Please, keep publishing more like this!


stephhicks68 profile image

stephhicks68 8 years ago from Bend, Oregon

Hi Diana! I read your Hub through Digg and Mixx! Of course, I am finally now submitting a comment. This is excellent! I wrote a Hub on Black History Month in February and featured C. Delores Tucker, among others. You have done a fantastic job with this important subject and I agree that each of these women are true pioneers, worth learning about and following! All the best - Steph

p.s. So great to see PenmanZee commenting too! Hi there - we miss you! Steph


In The Doghouse profile image

In The Doghouse 8 years ago from California Author

New Day,

Thanks for the encouraging words... I do think that American Pioneers are incredible people that need to be recognized. These women fit that description to a T! I am glad you happened to find me! :)


In The Doghouse profile image

In The Doghouse 8 years ago from California Author

Hi Steph,

I am glad you found me..thanks for the added support on this one. These women do merit a tribute that is for sure. They were pioneers who made a difference to the world of women everywhere. Their voices were for change and the change was to benefit all. Thanks again for coming by and commenting!


ripplemaker profile image

ripplemaker 8 years ago from Cebu, Philippines

Hi Diana, as I read through your hub, I can see how great these women are. I know they must have gone through hardships and have shed many tears. But they persevered and stood up for what they felt was right. Many things have happened since then. I sometimes wonder if I can be brave enough to always stand up for the many things I truly believe in. Thank you for this wonderful compilation. This is an inspiration. Like you are to me. :) Thanks.


In The Doghouse profile image

In The Doghouse 8 years ago from California Author

Hi Michelle,

Standing up for what you believe to be right is a hard thing to do sometimes. It is especially hard when it is unpopular. Having the courage to do so IMHO comes from a source greater that just us by ourselves. Faith is a motivating factor in any pioneering effort. These women had that courage and faith and just "did it"! I believe when we are called upon to stand up... we will exhibit the same faith. Thanks for your example to me as well.


tranndee profile image

tranndee 8 years ago

Spectacularlly excellent hub! I take my hat off. These strong intellegent women are important in civil rights. Even with contributions that may seem "smaller" compared to other notables, their consistant work did indeed make inroads, sometimes quiet and deep, and their presence has had an impact. I am passing on this hub to everyone I know. And I will be making a road trip to Cinci to see this exhibit. Keep up the excellent work, please!


In The Doghouse profile image

In The Doghouse 8 years ago from California Author

tranndee,

I am glad you enjoyed this Hub. I too take my hat off to these magnificent women. Every thing they fought for, no matter how small, has made a difference in the world today... to me this is the pioneering spirit that made this country great! I admire and respect them for their integrity and courage. Thanks for your kind words.


kiana 7 years ago

i want to become a freedom sister just lie you guys so Ithat way Ican have dreams and live them love them like you guys cause I have faith and potential


In The Doghouse profile image

In The Doghouse 7 years ago from California Author

Kiana,

These great African American are really such great examples to us all. They fought for what they believed in and tried to make the world a better place for those who followed... they were truly pioneers!


AprilButlerPryce profile image

AprilButlerPryce 7 years ago from Jacksonville, Florida

Amazing... I put together a Black History Program in Okinawa, Japan speaking about some of these beautiful women. Thank you for bringing awareness to Hubpages. It's in times like this, and because of people like you that I know we are all one and should all be created equal. A lot of people probably haven't heard of these women, and it's about time they did.

God Bless You and again Thank you. When you have a moment, please feel free to stop by my page, I also write about things that may be of interest to you.

In His Presence and for His Glory

April Butler Pryce (Author of Beauty for Ashes (poems that reveal and restore)


blackbutterfly103 profile image

blackbutterfly103 7 years ago from Cohoes, New York

Wow alot of these's Sisters I have notr heard of Thank you for the brief moment of knowledgement you have taught me a lot


tomdhum profile image

tomdhum 7 years ago from memphis tn

what can someone say but outstanding hub. like to have your thoughts on modern day rasism. thanks lol tomdhum


mrs_cutey_09 7 years ago

i love learnig about these freedom sisters. I'm only in the 8th grade they are very specail to me without them the world would not be how it is now. But i just wanna show some love 4 the 20 freedom sisters who changed the world. :)


halle  7 years ago

i want to carry on Mary McLeod Bethune and Coretta Scott King life style


jxb7076 profile image

jxb7076 7 years ago from United States of America

Excellent collection! Great information! Thanks for sharing.


PGA 7 years ago

Great comments on this site......I coordinate this exhibition for Ford Motor Company and am thrilled that it is touching so many people.....next stop for the exhibit is DuSable Museum in Chicago in late January 2010....then on to Dallas, Atlanta and Philly. Ford also is awarding scholarships to students who enter and place in a Freedom's Sister essay contest in each city.....


Samantha 6 years ago

This exhibition is on view at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum in Baltimore, MD beginning October 23, 2010! Visit www.africanamericanculture.org for details


Baldgouyaveman 5 years ago

What powerful sisters


male 4 years ago

it was as beautiful as i can remember. my favorite freedoms sister is betty shabazz


SilentMagenta profile image

SilentMagenta 23 months ago

Septima Poinsette Clark,Betty Shabazz and kathleen Cleaver seems like a women others should want to know about. At first this just started as a tattoo I wanted now I want to learn more about these women. Great hub.


keishialeelouis profile image

keishialeelouis 18 months ago from Georgia, USA

Thank you for this insightful hub! I'm leaving a comment because, I would like to keep track of the information here. Good job!

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