"Hello" in Other Languages

This Tamil youth making a greeting gesture was photographed by Livingston on January 6, 2012 in the state of Tamil Nadu (formerly the state of Madras) in India.
This Tamil youth making a greeting gesture was photographed by Livingston on January 6, 2012 in the state of Tamil Nadu (formerly the state of Madras) in India. | Source

Starting a Conversation

What do you do when traveling and you would like to start a conversation with someone or ask for directions or ask where you can find a public toilet?

You should always say hello, but what else should you do?

How should you approach people at a social gathering or in a business setting? Should you shake hands when you meet someone? Should you kiss them on both cheeks?

This article will assist you, but remember...customs change, so be certain to verify the facts for a given country before you leave home.

Greeting People

Should you shake hands? Should you kiss someone on both cheeks? Read this guide to find out.

A. Davey took this photograph of two men greeting each other on October 26, 2007 along the route from the falls of the Blue Nile to the city of Bahir Dar in northwestern Ethiopia.
A. Davey took this photograph of two men greeting each other on October 26, 2007 along the route from the falls of the Blue Nile to the city of Bahir Dar in northwestern Ethiopia. | Source

* Algeria *

Handshaking is a common greeting, both on meeting some and upon leavung. Kissing someone upon both cheeks—both men and women—is also a common form of greeting.

* Australia *

A firm handshake is customary.

* Bangladesh *

When introduced to a man, it is customary to shake hands. When introduced to a woman, wait for her to extend her hand first.

* Belgium *

Cheek kissing is done three times, alternating cheeks. Shake hands when greeting or saying goodbye to each person at a social or business gathering.

* Brazil *

Both men and women shake hands when they meet and upon leaving.

* Bulgaria *

A handshake is the usual form of greeting.

* Chile *

When people are first introduced, a handshake is customary, as is a kiss in the right cheek.

* China (People's Republic of China) *

A slight bow is appropriate when meeting someone. A handshake is also acceptable.

* Côte d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast) *

A handshake is the customary form of greeting.

* Egypt *

Greeting are often elaborate and effusive, with the host welcoming the visitor many times.

* Finland *

A firm handshake is the usual form of greeting.

* Denmark *

A handshake is the usual form of greeting.

* France *

A light handshake is the usual form of greeting.

* Ghana *

It is customary to shake hands when greeting people and upon leaving.

* Greece *

There aren't any rules for greeting people. Greeks may shake hands, embrace and/or kiss at the first meeting and all meetings which follow.

Hong Kong

Handshakes are common when greeting someone and when leaving.

* Hungary *

A handshake is the usual form of greeting. A man should wait for a woman to extend her hand first.

* Indonesia *

When you are introduced to someone for the first time, a handshake and a nod of the head are proper.

* Iran *

A handshake accompanied by a slight bow is customary.

* Italy *

A handshake is the usual form of greeting.

* Japan *

The usual form of greeting is a long and low bow.

* Kenya *

It is customary to shake hands when greeting people and upon leaving.

* Lebanon *

When greeting people, it is important that you remember to ask about their well-being and their families.

* Luxembourg *

A handshake is a common form of greeting.

* Malaysia *

A handshake is a common form of greeting among men. A slight bow or nod is more appropriate between a man and a Malaysian woman.

* Morocco *

A handshake is the customary form of greeting.

* New Zealand *

A handshake is appropriate when meeting someone and upon leaving. Wait for a woman to extend her hand first.

* Netherlands *

Shake hands with everyone present, including children.

* Pakistan *

A handshake is a common form of greeting.

* Senegal *

It is customary to shake hands when introduced.

* Singapore *

A handshake is the most common form of greeting.

* South Korea *

Men greet each other by bowing slightly and shaking hands with both hands, or just the right hand. Women usually do not shake hands.

* Tahiti *

Most people shake hands when they meet. If you are in a group of 30 people or less, you are expected to shake hands with everyone in the group.

* Taiwan *

A handshake is customary when meeting acquaintances and close friends. A nod of the head is appropriate when meeting someone for the first time.

* Tanzania *

It is customary to shake hands when introduced.

* Tonga *

A handshake is the customary greeting.

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Say "Hello"

Listed below are the ways in which to say hello in several foreign languages. If you have a translation to add, please post it in the Comments section. Thank you.

Andy king50 took this photograph on November 27, 2011 of a traditional Maori greeting ceremony for visitors in Whakarearewa, Rotorua, New Zealand.
Andy king50 took this photograph on November 27, 2011 of a traditional Maori greeting ceremony for visitors in Whakarearewa, Rotorua, New Zealand. | Source

* Arabic *

مرحبا
marhaba(n) — the "n" is not pronounced

* Catalan *

Hola (informal)
(pronounced OH-lah)

* Chinese *

Ni hao

* Croatian *

Bog (informal)
(pronounced bohk)

* Czech *

Dobrý den (formal)
(pronounced Dobree den)

Ahoy (informal)
(pronounced Ahoy)

* Danish *

Hallo (formal)
(pronounced halo)

Hej (informal)
(pronounced hay)

* Dutch *

Hallo
(pronounced HAH-low)

* Finnish *

Moi (informal)
(pronounced MOI)

Hei (informal)
(pronounced HAY)

Terve (informal)
(pronounced TEHR-veh)

* French *

Bonjour (formal)
(pronounced bohng-ZHOOR)

Salut (informal)
(pronounced sah-LUU)

* German *

Guten Tag (formal)
(pronounced GOO-ten-tahk)

Hallo (informal)
(pronounced hah-LOH)

Grüß Gott! (in Austria and the south of Germany only)
(pronounced gruus got)

Servus! (in Austria and Bavaria only—to a friend; informal, but polite)
(pronounced SEHR-voos)

Moin! Moin! (coastline in the north of Germany only, up to 12:00Noon)
(pronounced moin moin)

Moin! (coastline in the north of Germany only, after12:00Noon)
(pronounced moin)

* Greek *

Γεια σας (formal)
(pronounced YAH sahss)

γειά σου (Informal)
(pronounced YAH soo)

* Hebrew *

שלום
Shalom
(pronounced shah-LOHM)

* Hungarian *

Szervusz (formal)
(pronounced SER-voos)

Szia (informal)
(pronounced SEE-ya)

* Italian *

Buon giorno (formal)
(pronounced bwohn JOHR-noh)

Ciao (informal)
(pronounced chow)

* Indonesian *

Halo (formal)
(pronounced HUH-lo)

He (informal)
(pronounced Hey)

* Japanese *

kon-nee-chee-WAH

* Malay *

Hello (formal)

Hi (informal)

* Norwegian *

Hei (informal)
(pronounced hay)

* Polish *

Dzien dobry (formal)
(pronounced Jeyn Dob-ry)

Czesc (informal)
(pronounced Tch-esh-ch)

* Portuguese *

Bom dia (formal)
(pronounced bon DEE-ah)

Olá (informal)
(pronounced O-lá)

* Russian *

здравствуйте (formal)
ZDRAHST-vooy-tye

привет (informal)
pree-VYET

* Spanish *

Hola (informal)
(pronounced OH-lah)

* Swedish *

Hej (informal)
(pronounced hay)

Hej, Hej! (more informal)
(pronounced hay, hay!)

* Thai *

sa-wat-dii (informal)

haloh (answering the phone)

* Turkish *

Merhaba (formal)
(pronounced mehr hah bah)

Selam (informal)
(pronounced sell um)

Reader-Submitted Translations

Several of my readers have submitted translations of "hello." I will be adding them to this section as I receive them.

* Tamil *

My thanks to Mohan Kumar (Docmo), who was born in the state of Tamil Nadu, India for sending me the information related to the Tamil translation...

There is no direct translation for hello. The welcome word in Tamil is vanakkam, which functions as a greeting.

* Translations from Vinaya Ghimire in Kathmandu, Nepal *

Vinaya Ghimire from Kathmandu, Nepal submitted the following translations.

In Nepal, the generic greeting is Namaste.

In Pakistan, the Urdu greeting is Salam Walakum, and the reply is Walakum Salam.

* Translation and Greeting from Anamika S in Mumbai, India *

Anamika S from Mumbai, India has said that Namaste is used as a greeting, and that a handshake is sometimes also offered.

* Translations from Paul Kuehn in Bangkok, Thailand *

Paul Kuehn from Bangkok, Thailand had submitted the following translations.

  • In Vietnam, people say chao an.
  • The Laotians say sa bai dee.
  • The Burmese say ming ga la ba.
  • The Muslim Arabs say assalamualaikum.

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Comments 80 comments

Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 4 years ago from Orlando, FL

There are a lot of handshakes going on, some countries might want to consider shaking things up a bit and starting a new tradition like a fist bump or high five.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Linda (Sunshine625),

Thanks for reading my article and being the first person to comment. I appreciate your continued support of my work.

I agree with you completely about the handshakes. Fist bumps and high fives are both great ideas.


Janine Huldie profile image

Janine Huldie 4 years ago from New York, New York

You I loved reading your article on saying goodbye in these different countries, so only fitting that I love how to also say hello. Another wonderful and very informative hub for the world traveler out there. Have of course voted and shared too!!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Janine,

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. Thanks for sharing my Hub, too. I'm glad you're enjoying my linguistics series.


Vellur profile image

Vellur 4 years ago from Dubai

This is very useful, specially for people who travel around the world. A great list, so many countries. Voted up and shared.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Nithya (Vellur),

Thank you for reading my article, adding your comment, and sharing my Hub. I appreciate your continued support of my writing.


unknown spy profile image

unknown spy 4 years ago from Neverland - where children never grow up.

"Kumusta" is the word we always greet in Phils. And just a simple kiss on the cheek :)


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Myz (unknown spy),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. Thanks, too, for providing the Filipino translation. I appreciate it.


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 4 years ago from New York

What a great hub! You always do your homework and give us so much information. Lots to absorb here but certainly something anyone who travels can use!

Voted up, useful, awesome, and interesting.


ChristyWrites profile image

ChristyWrites 4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

So many ways to say hello Daisy! This hub is another useful one out of your wonderful collection. Vote up!


livingsta profile image

livingsta 4 years ago from United Kingdom

Interesting hub, enjoyed the hub with a smile. Voted up and interesting!


ignugent17 profile image

ignugent17 4 years ago

Thanks all the hellos all over the world. It is always nice to hear say your own language. It makes the person proud.

Voted up and interesting! :-)


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 4 years ago from California

Thank you in Russian is Spaseba--so spaseba for this great hub!


Alecia Murphy profile image

Alecia Murphy 4 years ago from Wilmington, North Carolina

It's interesting to see how many countries use handshakes as greetings. And also how hello looks quite similar as well. Great hub!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Mary (tillsontitan),

Thanks for reading my Hub and commenting. I try to write articles that are informative, yet fun at the same time. Saying "hello" is such an easy thing to do, both at home and while traveling. Too many people, unfortunately, forget to say it.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Christy,

Thanks for reading and commenting in another of my articles. I'm glad you're enjoying my linguistics series.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

livingsta,

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading and commenting in my article. If you get a chance, you might like to read some of the other Hubs in my linguistics series.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

ignugent17,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I think when traveling, it's important to greet people in the language of the country one is visiting.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Audrey,

Thanks for reading my Hub and commenting. I'm glad you enjoyed reading it. What did you think of the photographs I found on Wikimedia Commons?


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Alecia,

It's good to see you again. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment.

Did you read Linda's comment about the handshakes?...She suggested high fives and fist bumps might be tried in some countries.


quicksand profile image

quicksand 4 years ago

In Malaysia and Indonesia they also say "Selamat!" (pronounced slamat)

"Selamat" is used in many forms of greetings in these two countries. For instance Selamat Pagi means good morning and Selamat Malam would be good evening. However, simply saying "Salamat" would in most cases suffice. I have visited both these countries. Cheers!


NateB11 profile image

NateB11 4 years ago from California, United States of America

Very interesting stuff. It is interesting how many countries use the handshake, and also that often you wait for a woman to extend her hand first. Good idea they have in Holland to shake everyone's hand, might indicate their view of equality among people. Very fascinating and useful information, thanks!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

quicksand,

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. All of the countries I listed have words for good morning, good afternoon, and good evening in addition to hello. The other words might be the subject of another Hub.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

NateB11,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my Hub and commenting. I was surprised, too, at how many countries used the handshake as a form of greeting.


Genna East profile image

Genna East 4 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

What I especially liked about this hub was the respect for other cultures. This is soo important as we live in a global community -- today, more than ever. Fascinating write, Daisy, thank you!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Genna,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment.

One of the things I learned while studying international business is that just because the culture of another country is different from one's own, that culture should still be respected.


rcrumple profile image

rcrumple 4 years ago from Kentucky

Daisy - Sorry I missed this one. There have been many changes over the years as the Internet and communication in general has encompassed us. Many of the above listed countries had much more involved greetings at one time. Funny how civilization is changing many to a standard greeting acceptance. Great Job! Very Informative!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Rich (rcrumple),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting. I appreciate your continued support of my writing.

It was surprising to me how many countries have a handshake type of greeting and a spoken greeting that sounds similar to HUH-lo or hah-LOW. The Internet's influence is really far-reaching.


alocsin profile image

alocsin 4 years ago from Orange County, CA

This word comes in handy as a nice icebreaker when you're traveling. Voting this Up and Useful.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Aurelion (alocsin),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting. You're absolutely right about the icebreaker when traveling. A smile and "hello" will be very much appreciated.


rajan jolly profile image

rajan jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

Very useful info Daisy. This is a great resource to bookmark for reference when need arises. I'm glad I'll be having it when I need to know one.

Voting it up and across and sharing.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Rajan,

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. I'm glad my Hub was worth your adding a bookmark.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 4 years ago from Taos, NM

What an interesting and informative hub! I enjoyed reading this and learning the customs of the different countries. Whan I taught Spanish, we would roll play and practice greeting one another in Spanish and going through the gestures they do in different Spanish speaking countries. Very relevant and helpful hub for travelers.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Suzannah (suzettenaples),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I'm glad you enjoyed it. Being aware of the customs in the countries one visits is an important part of traveling.


Teresa Coppens profile image

Teresa Coppens 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

Great article Daisy. I don't travel outside of North America often but I'll know what articles to keep handy when I do.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Teresa,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. I appreciate your keeping my article in mind should you travel outside North America.


Vinaya Ghimire profile image

Vinaya Ghimire 4 years ago from Nepal

In Nepali custom, it is mandatory, among relatives, to place your head on your elders feet or hand as a way of greeting. Namaste is a generic greeting which means hello.

I believe Pakistani people say Salam Walakum to greet people and the person greeted replies Walakum Salam. (My Pakistani friend told me this). Salam means hello in Urdu language, which is the language of Pakistan.


Anamika S profile image

Anamika S 4 years ago from Mumbai - Maharashtra, India

Interesting hub! Whenever I meet anyone new from my country (India), I mostly stick to the traditional 'namaste' or handshake at times. But some foreigners have also surprised me by using the same greeting. But I guess, you could impress people by greeting on their own language. Shared!


jainismus profile image

jainismus 4 years ago from Pune, India

Nice collection of 'Hello' in other languages, thank you for sharing.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 4 years ago from Udorn City, Thailand

This hub is very interesting and has caught my attention because I have been researching how members of ASEAN countries say hello. In Vietnam, people say "chao an." The Laotians say, "sa bai dee, " and the Burmese say, "ming ga la ba." Also, the Muslim Arabs will say,

"assalamualaikum" as a greeting for "hello." Literally, I think it means "Allah" be with you. Voted up and sharing.


greatstuff profile image

greatstuff 4 years ago from Malaysia

In Malay, it should be 'Apa Khabar?' meaning 'how are you?' as a way of saying hello. However, among the western educated Malaysian, saying Hi or Hello is common and it has become an accepted way of saying Hello. Likewise for Indonesia, that share almost similar language to ours.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Vinaya,

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. When I was doing the research for my Hub, I found many ways that relatives or close friends greeted each other. That might be the subject of another article.


Tealparadise profile image

Tealparadise 4 years ago

Wow! Neat article. Great for reference. To people travelling, "Soo-mi-ma-sen-ga..." in an apologetic tone is Japanese for "Excuse me but...." and will get someone to turn and look at you so that you can ask a question.

Additionally, I find the normal "How's the weather?" small talk differences pretty cool. "How are you?" is pretty standard in the US, but I've noticed that other countries don't ask that unless they really want to know about the person's health or life.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Anamika,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article, commenting in it, and sharing it. I've added your translation and greeting to my Hub. Thanks for including them in your comment.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

jainismus,

Thanks for reading my article and commenting. I'm glad you enjoyed my Hub.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Paul,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment.

I've added your translations to my Hub. I appreciate your providing them.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Mazlan (greatstuff),

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I'll keep your translations in mind if I publish a Hub containing other greetings.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Tealparadise,

Welcome to HubPages. It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment.


SkeetyD profile image

SkeetyD 4 years ago from Barbados

I found this to be an excellent and informative hub. Really enjoyed reading it. Voted up!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

SkeetyD,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. I appreciate your very kind words.


ishwaryaa22 profile image

ishwaryaa22 4 years ago from Chennai, India

A well-researched hub! I am quite familiar with South Asian forms of greeting & used 3 words at times such as 'Hallo', 'Hola' & 'Bonjour'. I learnt more from this engaging hub of yours! Well-done!

Thanks for SHARING. Useful & Interesting. Voted up & Shared


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Ish (ishwaryaa22),

Thanks for reading my article, commenting in it, and sharing it. I appreciate your continued support of my writing.

What I especially like about this Hub is the reader contributions. It's wonderful that so many readers have taken the time to submit translations to be added to my article.


lovedoctor926 4 years ago

I found this hub very useful. It's interesting how each culture has its own set of traditions when it comes to kissing and handshaking. In Belgium, people kiss on the cheek three times. This is something new to me. The translation guide for hello is very helpful too. Nice to meet you Daisy. Voted up.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

lovedoctor926,

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I'm glad you found the information to be helpful. I enjoy writing articles that are educational in a gentle sort of way.


Adama Gidado 4 years ago

This is very useful for those of us who love traveling. Lionel's song is definitely an old time favorite.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Adama,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. When traveling, it's great to be able to greet people in the language of the country one is visiting.


Kathryn Stratford profile image

Kathryn Stratford 3 years ago from Manchester, Connecticut

This is very informative, thank you! I like that you added in a section for reader-submitted translations.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Kathryn,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment.

Several readers posted translations in their comments. I thought it would be easier for everyone to see them if I added the translations to my article.


CrazedNovelist profile image

CrazedNovelist 3 years ago from Hampton, GA

Very cool Mariposa! Love it :) You know I love languages!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Aubrey (CrazedNovelist),

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I hope you have a chance to read some of my other linguistics Hubs.


seb powen 3 years ago

wow.... so nice... presented in a beautiful style.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

seb,

It's nice to "see" you. I'm glad you saw my post in Google+ and came here to read and comment in my article. Thanks very much.


HappyMikeWritter profile image

HappyMikeWritter 3 years ago

In Czech the informal greeting Ahoy should be Ahoj but pronounciation is correct. Such a lovely article to see How people greet themselves in their own language. Knowing it can create a connection bridges for everyone .

Fabulous article. It must have taken a great time to collect all those greetings. Simply amazing :-)


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Mike (HappyMikeWritter),

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. Thanks, too, for the correction of the Czech spelling.


ChitrangadaSharan profile image

ChitrangadaSharan 2 years ago from New Delhi, India

This is another great hub from you, regarding greetings in different countries/ languages. Truly interesting and informative.

In addition to Namaste, as you have mentioned above, we also fold both our hands in India and say Namaskaar, or Pranam!

But there are other ways to say Hello, in different regional languages as well.

Very nice and interesting hub indeed! Voted up!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Chitrangada,

Thanks for reading another of my linguistics articles and posting your comments. With so many official languages in India, I can imagine there must be many greetings for saying "hello."

In addition to having a four-year degree in Fine Arts, I have occupational certificates in Travel Management and International Business. I think having the two certificates is why I am so interested in other cultures...or perhaps it's the other way around.


vocalcoach profile image

vocalcoach 2 years ago from Nashville Tn.

Hi Daisy -

I enjoyed this article so very much. I actually went through the list of 'hellos' in different languages to learn the correct pronunciation for each country.

For me, it's surprising how many variations of the word 'hello' actually resemble our own, just changing the vowel sound.

Thanks for this out-standing article and am sharing this with friends and more.


DealForALiving profile image

DealForALiving 2 years ago from Earth

Really great hub, and I appreciate that you don't just give the word for "Hello".


chef-de-jour profile image

chef-de-jour 2 years ago from Wakefield, West Yorkshire,UK

Greetings Daisy, hi, ayup ( old Yorkshire) and thank you for all the hellos. A great resource for all who travel, of interest for those who love to stay in their armchairs.

Votes and a share.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Audrey (vocalcoach),

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I don't recall whether anyone else has posted that they went through and practiced all the pronunciations. What a fun thing to do!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

DealForALiving,

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. What a "deal" this is ... getting all these translations and pronunciations in one place!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Andrew (chef-de-jour),

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it.

I've written a number of linguistics Hubs. I hope you'll have an opportunity to read some of the others.


Paula Atwell profile image

Paula Atwell 2 years ago from Cleveland, OH

Just a note that Shalom (Hebrew) actually means "peace" but is used for hello and good-bye.


Thelma Alberts profile image

Thelma Alberts 2 years ago from Germany

It´s fun how we learn to greet in other countries. It is "Hello" and "Kumusta" (how are you) in Philippines greetings or "Mabuhay." In Germany you have to shake hands with a man, woman and kids and say "Hallo."


brownella profile image

brownella 2 years ago from New England

Great hub topic, very useful! Traveling is much more pleasant if you just smile and learn a little bit of the language and culture before hand. I like to look up the cultural "do's and don'ts" before I go somewhere too so I don't absentmindedly offend anyone :-)


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Paula,

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I find it interesting that there are many languages in which one word can have a number of meanings.


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Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Thelma,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. It's interesting that a number of countries have greetings quite similar to the American English "hello."


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Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

brownella,

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. A smile goes a long way toward breaking the ice when encountering someone in another country. Just being able to say "hello" in the other person's language is a big help. too.


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Sunshine625 22 months ago from Orlando, FL

I recently learned ... A Presto is see you soon in Italian. I'll be saying that to Michelle daily for 5 months :)


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Daisy Mariposa 22 months ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Linda,

Extended traveling time can be rough on family members. Working in another country, however, is a great experience.

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