How Music Turned Me Into An A+ Student

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By Tony Margiotta

I was an average child when it came to grades and test scores in elementary school. I did some homework, studied a little, but I was bored out of my mind. Probably like a lot of your children. Nothing seemed to interest me when it came to school. Then I discovered the guitar. My life was changed forever.

I expressed interest in learning the guitar to my mom. She grew up studying the organ and knew the type of discipline and commitment it took to learn a musical instrument. Since my grades weren’t the best, she wasn’t supportive in the beginning.

I kept on talking about learning the guitar for about a year. I was finally able to convince her to take me to a music store where they sold instruments. And there it was, hanging up on the wall.

It was a bright and shiny red guitar. When the salesman picked up that guitar and started playing it, I can’t express to you how excited I got. I begged my mom to buy this guitar. I couldn’t leave the store without it.

Again, my mom spent many years studying the organ and knew the commitment that I would have to make to learn how to play the guitar. She was certainly a bit hesitant. So she made a deal with me.

She said, “Tony, if you buy the guitar with your own savings, I’ll pay for the guitar lessons. But you have to take the lessons or you can’t buy the guitar.” She would not have allowed me to spend my own savings on something that I couldn’t commit to. So I agreed, and the lessons began.

By the time I went off to high school, I was still somewhat in the average category, (A’s, B’s and C’s with an occasional D). But I will tell you that my interest in school and the subjects that I studied seemed more interesting to me than I had remembered before.

I started to grow a fascination for how things worked. I wanted to understand things. What was happening behind the scenes during this period, was that I was practicing my guitar, reading music, and learning music theory.

I will be honest with you here. I didn’t kill myself with hours and hours of homework when I went home after school. I went home and practiced my guitar everyday. But something big had changed.

I was doing very well on my tests in English, Math, and Science, (Mostly A’s and B’s).) I was now getting on the Honor Roll. There was definitely an improvement.

Though I didn’t enjoy my alarm clock buzzing at 6 in the morning to wake me up and prepare for school, I did look forward to going to school everyday. I was happy to be there. To be learning. This was also a big change to my previous behavior of dreading the idea of going to school everyday.

My sister on the other hand, used to come home everyday and study for hours and still couldn’t get the grades that I was getting. She used to say to me all the time, “I don’t know how you do it Tony. You hardly ever study and you’re always on the Honor Roll.”

My sister made me wonder how I could study little but still got good grades and be on the Honor Roll. In high school, I felt that at the end of every class, I understood and remembered the material that my teacher explained. So when I went to Study Hall which was the Free Period, I would do most of my homework and studying within a 45-minute period of time.

Now I don’t want to give you the impression that I never studied or did my homework at home. Sometimes I did bring a book or two. Or I had to write a paper here and there at home. But I was able most of the time to complete my daily homework and studies during the Free Period.

Then I went off to college. My ability to learn fast, retain more information, and hunger for knowledge increased more and more. I was on the Dean’s List every semester for FOUR years with very high grades. I even earned a 4.0 Grade Point Average several times, which is all A’s for every course. The same thing happened when I went to Graduate School and earned my Master’s Degree.

So how did I go from being an average and bored student to an A+ student with a strong hunger for knowledge?

I can tell you without a doubt it was because I learned how to play a musical instrument. Now I am not a psychologist or even an expert in education. But I can promise you that my life would have turned out differently if I didn’t learn music. I would have been just “average” at best.

Since finishing school, I have always had a good paying job. I moved out of Mom and Dad’s house and have been independent ever since. I pay my own bills. I have my own apartment. I’ve developed a solid reputation in my career and networking has opened me up to many other opportunities. Wouldn’t you like your child to have the same success as me?

Ok. So I’m finished with the bragging. I just wanted to share with you the effects of music on my personal educational development and how it helps me even today, in the world economy and the recession that lurks over it.

My advice to you as a parent is to help your child reach that A+ status by getting them involved in music. If your child is already an A+ student and you’re looking for an extracurricular activity for her, you’ve come to the right place.

I will tell you however, that music training is NOT an extracurricular activity. It’s an essential part of a student’s foundation for learning. Even if your child is already an A+ student, music will still enrich her life and take her intellect to even higher levels.

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Comments 5 comments

rebekahELLE profile image

rebekahELLE 5 years ago from Tampa Bay

What a wonderful story, and inspiring. I totally agree that learning to play music is one of the greatest ways a parent can help their child develop their brain and it also teaches discipline. I have two sons who both play many instruments and one of them also composes music. Their father played music as well as myself, so it was exciting when they showed interest in learning to play. The oldest son also became a straight A student throughout college. There are so many benefits!

How exciting for you, and now you help others! I look forward to reading more of your hubs.


TheMusiconomy profile image

TheMusiconomy 5 years ago from New York City Author

Thank you so much rebekah! I also loved hearing about your kids. It's stories like yours that convince me more and more about my philosophy that music is the link between intelligent minds and prosperous lives. Please follow me. I will be writing more and more.


UrsulaRose 5 years ago

I so need to get my 14 year old to read your Hub Article.

My problem is that he is already an Academic student who now finds his music (esp. music class theory and practice) BORING! He enjoys the social interaction of playing his clarinet/bass clarinet in the band but he does not see the sense or need in 'the other stuff' if he has no intention of being a professional musician'.

My two other children (girls 12 & 9) both play musical instruments - flute and violin (so far no problems with them except the odd reminder from mum about doing their home-practice).

I personally regret 'playing up' at school when I had the opportunity to learn a musical instrument ... although I cannot play and/or read music, I need music in its various forms to get me through the day.

Keep up your good work Tony with The Musiconomy. I look forward to reading your future hubs.


TheMusiconomy profile image

TheMusiconomy 5 years ago from New York City Author

Thank you for your kind words UrsulaRose. I wonder if your son is being challenged enough on his instrument. That could be a reason he's bored. Certainly theory can get a little boring but I always looked at theory is a big jigsaw puzzle, full of pieces that logically work together and make sense.

When you say he is already academic, I assume you mean he has good grades and is overall a smart character:-)

If he is doing really well in the theory class, he could also be bored and needs something a little more challenging.

Even if he has no intention of becoming a pro musician, music theory will help him develop the part of the brain that is used for math and problem solving.

The Scientist Galileo, was also a musician and claimed that by studying music, and understanding how it functioned structurally, led him to many discoveries in mathematics. So just tell him it's good for him:-)

The Musiconomy has a monthly newsletter that I send out covering topics like these. I write articles for parents, students and teachers. The newsletter is free and might pique your son's interest.

Here's the link: http://www.themusiconomy.com/newsletter.html

There's a 2-minute video and below there's a sign-up form.

I'm going to check out some of your hubs too. You look like a prolific hubber!


UrsulaRose 5 years ago

Tony, thanks for your answer to my comment/question.

My son is already in the A+ (Academic) class for his core subjects such as Maths, Science, etc.

I'll take on board what you have said and will have a chat to his music teacher. I'll also check out your newsletter.

Thanks again. :-)

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