How the Stonehenge was Built

Source

Stonehenge I


The construction of the Stonehenge must have been incredibly difficult and oviously time consuming. It took about 500 years of construction for each stage. The Windmill Hill people, Stonehenge I, began construction in 3100 B.C. They started with the ditch measuring 320 feet in diameter, 6 feet wide, 6 feet deep, and edged with mounds on each side. Natural erosion has cuased the ditch to lessen in depth. Archaeologist have found tools that they must have used to dig the ditch scattered about the site. They used the shoulder blades of oxen and antlers of deer to scrape and dig up dirt. Concentric to the inside of the ditch are 56 perfectly spaced holes, 3 feet wide and 3 feet deep. These holes were discovered by John Aubrey giving them the name Aubrey holes. They believe these holes were to temporarily hold wooden posts for religous ceremonies, but then filled in with the ashes of cremated human remains. They left an entrance to the Northeast. Placed by the Northeast entrance is a large sarsen stone called the "Slaughter Stone". Appearently, the "Slaughter Stone" was suppose to be one of a pair. Fifty feet outside of the circular mound stands the 16 foot tall sarsen stone called the "Heel Stone", also thought to have been a pair. "Heel Stone" wieghs several tons and is claimed to have come from Marlborough Downs. It sets exactly under the sunrise on the Summer Solstice. After all this detail and dedication, the Windmill Hill people ended the Stonehenge I construction in 2300 B.C. Why stop such magnificent work? Why the change in cultural architecture? So many unanswered questions that will hopefully have an answer in time. Join me next time for the construction of Stonehenge II.

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Comments 7 comments

BeccaWood profile image

BeccaWood 4 years ago from Southaven, MS Author

Thank you, Rock-nj. I'll try to figure it out.


Rock_nj profile image

Rock_nj 4 years ago from New Jersey

Becca, Check my instructions regarding Grouping in the Hub I cited. The instrucitons are very detailed. You should be able to follow them. These groupings are there for this very reason, to group similiar topics, so readers can just click through the related Hubs easily. It will increase your traffic on these Stonehenge Hubs.


BeccaWood profile image

BeccaWood 4 years ago from Southaven, MS Author

I also apologize, it doesn't seem to be as helpful as I thought it would be.


BeccaWood profile image

BeccaWood 4 years ago from Southaven, MS Author

haha I wish I knew how to do stuff like that or I would. Im not that good at computer stuff but I got this far. thanks for the tip though.


Rock_nj profile image

Rock_nj 4 years ago from New Jersey

Another interesting Stonehenge Hub. To provide an easy way for readers to read all of your Stonehenge Hubs, I suggest you Group your Stonehenge Hubs together, so that there is a navigation bar at the bottom of the Stonehenge Hubs linking them together for easy viewing.

See the "Ensure Hubs Are Properly Grouped and Tagged" section of my Hub for instructions: Using a Hub Milestone to Make Hubs More Searchable and Accessible.


BeccaWood profile image

BeccaWood 4 years ago from Southaven, MS Author

In my hub Connecting the dots I concluded that it was used to measure the winter and summer solstice for agricultural purposes. Thank you for reading my hub. This is just one of many on the stonehenge.


taheruddin profile image

taheruddin 4 years ago from Khulna Bangladesh

Thanks for your hub, Ms Becca Wood. It is very nice. But why they built this? What they did with it?

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